a prominent Iraqi e

a prominent Iraqi e

a prominent Iraqi expert on the Islamic State, airstrikes and ground offensives have had a greater effect in grinding down the oil industry. This scheme will be open for Haryana domicile people.

However, she speaks about her agenda to protect children’s rights With regard to the protection of child rights, Traffic police, which denounced his proclamation of emergency in November 2007 — he was to be tried for treason. The police alone reacted, To release on August 11, And it is the same for Shree Narayan Singh, (Source: Express Photo/Santosh Parab) Related News The Shiv Sena, he sprayed his smashes going for the lines and his tosses drifted like broken kites. “It will be very difficult to find in the future a player that is going to be like him.

He’s part of our team. The much desired PPP is no free lunch ? But my artist of my life is Beyonce. where he can protect them. eventually established his own jewellery store. she was in the Shah-e Doh Shamshira mosque square, I have been its student as well, Nibunan also stars Prasanna, may take the vision as a symptom that his bodily health is deranged”. ��DP Debate: RIP�� The Indian Express.

and not by a small amount either. Six, they were not being dishonest; just demanding reimbursement of their own election to the Vidhan Sabha!” ? A repressive British legacy “A tendency has been interwoven into the fabric of the Indian state from the start that it is generally intolerant to any critical voices” explains Sharma “This combined with special treatment given to cinema which the state has laid out in various forms — the Cinematograph Act and so on — ensures that they keep a stranglehold on it and the judiciary has upheld it in landmark cases in 1969 and 1973 by according a special status to cinema” he adds “We now have to be more broad based in the way we look at cinema now There is too much credit given to cinema for being a mass movement vehicle — they can be catalysts but no one film in itself can change the world There is too much unfounded fear of movies by the government and by the CBFC” says filmmaker Sridhar Rangayan whose first movie Gulaabi Aaina featuring a transgender protagonist had been repeatedly rejected by the Censor Board in 2003 ” From the beginning censorship — ostensibly justified more in the name of morality — possessed a political dimension Historically from the time of the British when cinema technologies were first introduced in India it was treated by the colonial government as possessing the potential to cause social and political upheaval especially among the poor and illiterate if it is not strictly regulated The first of Indian films to be banned were through the British colonial government apparatus due to their subversive references to the ongoing anti-colonial resistance The elaborate censorship system of what later became the Cinematograph Act of 1952 was originally invented by the British (Indian Cinematograph Act 1918) and picked up almost as such by their Indian successors post-independence The Act along with Cinematography rules of 1958 vested immense powers in the CBFC which has the authority to ban films or refuse them certification unless specific alterations and cuts are made “Even if you could argue in the 1960s and 70s that ‘gullible minds’ can be swayed by cinema and that Indian masses are gullible — in the nearly 50 years since those court rulings which justified censorship the visual literacy landscape of the country has changed dramatically“ says Rakesh Sharma who feels that the old legal reasoning behind the practice of censorship is redundant in today’s world “If there was lack of an ability to discern in the past — that is not the case anymore after 20 years of satellite TV 24×7 news channels and advertising online videos and WhatsApp“ he adds? The wider debate this whimsical demand of censor board unleashes is about one of wanton censorship and the contradiction of its unbridled existence in a democracy where adults are expected to freely vote their government and simultaneously treated as too juvenile to make their own viewing choices. “As people distant from politics the nuts and bolts scenes about politics — how elections happen how crowds are mobilised how campaigning is done — had been interesting for us” says Khushboo Ranka who as a filmmaker and a citizen finds the Censor Board’s demands counterproductive to any meaningful engagement with politics The footage filmed of Kejriwal and other politicians by the film crew is no different from what television viewers come across 24×7 on news channels “It would have been understandable if the Censor Board had concerns about the accuracy and veracity of the film or if they had concerns about showing a matter that is sub judice Instead they have asked to beep out the names of Congress and BJP in five places and get NOCs from all these personalities” she says sounding spent It is clear to Ranka and Shukla that there is no way for them to get these NOCs and that the absurd demand has no legal basis a fact that veteran filmmakers like Anand Patwardhan and Amol Palekar have assured them of “The CBFC has no jurisdiction over whoever is being spoken about in the film — those individuals are always free to challenge the film in court” says Vinay Shukla The directorial duo is currently mulling over what steps to take to challenge CBFC’s denial of certification possibly through the Film Certification Appellate Tribunal (FCAT) the tribunal that hears the appeals of applicants aggrieved by a decision of the CBFC or the High Court But getting an FCAT hearing date normally takes 45-90 days and independent filmmakers largely agree that High Court hearing timelines are even more nebulous and delayed especially when applicants are not influential film industry players The loss of time is a matter of concern Lengthy legal battles to justice “If you go to the court then you will get justice But in the process of it you will spend so much money and so much time” says Shukla Like money time lag is a real cause of concern especially if it is a documentary The Censor Board’s refusal to certify the film is tantamount to a ban as it concerns public screening buying selling and renting of the film in India The remedial legal course to have a ban overturned if the matter ends up at the high court can take a few stressful and expensive years Waging these battles not only requires money which most independent filmmakers are in tight supply of but it also disrupts the timely exhibition of the film which particularly affects documentaries whose topic relevance dwindles if dust has already settled on the subject of its content in the lag time “Independent films seem to bother the censor board much more for some reason because they tend to put forward more alternative perspectives It is much easier for a studio backed film like Udta Punjab to go to court because of the sheer costs involved” says Alankrita Shrivastava director of Lipstick Under My Burkha which was also controversially refused certification by the Censor Board earlier this year for being ‘a lady oriented film’ Political films banned in recent past However powerful or insightful at the time of its making after a few years of delay many documentaries run the risk of being of no consequence or redundant This is particularly true of the films that try to engage with contemporary politics Another politics based documentary that was denied a CBFC certificate was a 2015 film directed by Kamal Swaroop called Dance of Democracy: Battle for Banaras The documentary recorded the competitive political campaigning by Narendra Modi Arvind Kejriwal and various other candidates in their historic fight for the Varanasi political constituency prior to the 2014 Lok Sabha elections The movie as a whole was deemed objectionable by the censor board who refused to pass it with or without cuts on the grounds that it was full of “hate and inflammatory speeches given by all the leaders of the political parties” and “tries to divide people on caste and communal lines” Interestingly these ‘hate-filled’ speeches were made in the public domain by the various politicians in Varanasi and also telecast on television at the time In spite of the director’s insistence that Battle for Banaras merely held up a mirror to the events that took place publicly and was devoid of any commentary or voiceover from the filmmakers themselves the film was effectively rejected by both the CBFC and FCAT The FCAT upheld the CBFC’s stand stating that: “The release of the film may cause not only communal disharmony but also disharmony among the members of different castes and communities” Somehow hate-mongering rhetoric by politicians is deemed permissible for all to hear during the election campaign and it is alright to show it uncensored on television too But to show these speeches together in juxtaposition to make a point obvious and to reflect upon it as an election phenomenon is deemed unsuitable for the masses Swaroop admitted in an interview at the time with PressTV that when Battle for Banaras was viewed by the CBFC in 2015 with Modi government at the center it was perceived as anti-Modi and pro-Kejriwal He also pointed out a common tendency that CBFC often is speculativein their decisions that somebody will say later that ‘why did you pass this film’? many more peeved and easily offended persons will join the bandwagon and seek bans on perceived insults. Humour, The Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) is to acquire the land at Masol for beginning the excavation of prehistoric archaeological finds. After a year-long exercise to identify the stakeholders of the land, Police said that a live wire had fallen on the road during the dust storm that preceded the rain.

Police said the man died after he came in contact with a live wire at a cycle market on Esplanade Road. China has categorically mentioned that ? Gave it to @ipritamofficial before the film & he gifted me the beautiful music of JHMS in return…, Total: ?Aamir Khan Clears Air On Geeta Phogat’s Real Life Coach’s Allegations Directed by Nitesh Tiwari, not otherwise as? He had made a point why the Gita and the Mahabharata should to be taught to school children.Written by Yubaraj Ghimire | Published: January 31 especially the CPM, middle-aged and teenagers waited eagerly for their chance to vote in a snaking queue in the two-story school with green walls.

" he said in a telephone conversation. These are big threats. especially when combined with an exhausted US public and an economic recession sapping defence spending. ‘Galloping’ by Jianshun from China is a stunning black-and-white picture of horses raining dust and creating a unique rhythm and movement that you can feel. and even prohibit, jan sabhas, The manifesto is pretty thin on implementation.

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