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Whats Inside A Tesla Surfboard Lets Take A Look Video

first_img Find Out What’s Inside A Tesla Key Fob Here What’s Inside A Tesla Supercharger? Let’s Take A Look Let’s destroy a brand new surfboard.Sounds like a silly plan. It’s even sillier when you consider that this particular surfboard is a Tesla. Not only that, it’s a limited-run, collectible item that costs a ton of money.Let’s destroy it anyways.More What’s Inside Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 18, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Watch To Find Out What’s Inside A Tesla Tire Source: Electric Vehicle News Why would someone destroy a brand new Tesla surfboard? The answer: to see what’s inside. Perfectly fitting for the What’s Inside YouTube channel.This surfboard from Tesla was limited to just 200 units made. It sold for $1,500 a pop, but the one in the video cost even more. What’s Inside paid a whopping $3,000 for this board. For that amount of money, you might expect it to have Autopilot. It does not. And there are no Easter Eggs hidden within either.After testing it out in the surf conditions, What’s Inside jumped on top of it in between two Teslas. It eventually broke into two pieces.The Tesla surfboard has an EPS core, a layer of fiberglass and even some carbon fiber. Basically, it’s just like any other surfboard. But it does have that Tesla logo.Video description:Tesla made 200 limited edition surfboards, We try to surf it then CUT IT OPEN!last_img read more

Study finds widespread uranium contamination in Indias groundwater

first_imgJun 7 2018A new Duke University-led study has found widespread uranium contamination in groundwater from aquifers in 16 Indian states.The main source of the uranium contamination is natural, but human factors such as groundwater-table decline and nitrate pollution may be exacerbating the problem.Several studies have linked exposure to uranium in drinking water to chronic kidney disease.”Nearly a third of all water wells we tested in one state, Rajasthan, contained uranium levels that exceed the World Health Organization and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s safe drinking water standards,” said Avner Vengosh, a professor of geochemistry and water quality at Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment.”By analyzing previous water quality studies, we also identified aquifers contaminated with similarly high levels of uranium in 26 other districts in northwestern India and nine districts in southern or southeastern India,” he said.The new findings are the first to demonstrate the widespread prevalence of uranium in India’s groundwater.”The results of this study strongly suggest there is a need to revise current water-quality monitoring programs in India and re-evaluate human health risks in areas of high uranium prevalence,” Vengosh said. “Developing effective remediation technologies and preventive management practices should also be a priority.”The World Health Organization has set a provisional safe drinking water standard of 30 micrograms of uranium per liter, a level that is consistent with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards. Despite this, uranium is not yet included in the list of contaminants monitored under the Bureau of Indian Standards’ Drinking Water Specifications.Vengosh and his colleagues published their peer-reviewed study May 11 in Environmental Science & Technology Letters.To conduct the study, they sampled water from 324 wells in the states of Rajasthan and Gujarat and analyzed the water chemistry. In a subset of samples, they measured the uranium isotope ratios. They also analyzed similar data from 68 previous studies of groundwater geochemistry in Rajasthan, Gujarat and 14 other Indian states.Related StoriesBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryResearch finds link between air pollution and coronary heart disease in ChinaLow dose of endotoxin could have protective effect on men at risk of acute kidney injury”Our analysis showed that the occurrence of uranium in these groundwater sources depends on several factors,” said Rachel M. Coyte, a PhD student in Vengosh’s lab who was lead author of the study. These factors include the amount of uranium contained in an aquifer’s rocks; water-rock interactions that cause the uranium to be extracted from those rocks; oxidation conditions that enhance the extracted uranium’s solubility in water; and the interaction of the extracted uranium with other chemicals in the groundwater, such as bicarbonate, which can further enhance its solubility.”In many parts of India, these factors co-occur and result in high uranium concentrations in the groundwater,” Coyte explained. “Geochemistry and isotopic tools help us to better understand the process and conditions that control uranium occurrence in groundwater.”Human activities, especially the over-exploitation of groundwater for agricultural irrigation, may contribute to the problem, she said. Many of India’s aquifers are composed of clay, silt and gravel carried down from Himalayan weathering by streams or uranium-rich granitic rocks. When over-pumping of these aquifers’ groundwater occurs and their water levels decline, it induces oxidation conditions that, in turn, enhance uranium enrichment in the shallow groundwater that remains.”One of the takeaways of this study is that human activities can make a bad situation worse, but we could also make it better,” Vengosh said.”Including a uranium standard in the Bureau of Indian Standards’ Drinking Water Specification based on uranium’s kidney-harming effects, establishing monitoring systems to identify at-risk areas, and exploring new ways to prevent or treat uranium contamination will help ensure access to safe drinking water for tens of millions in India,” he said. Source:https://nicholas.duke.edu/about/news/widespread-uranium-contamination-found-indias-groundwaterlast_img read more

Study shows effectiveness of prenatal Tdap vaccine in preventing infant pertussis

first_imgJun 14 2018A study published today in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine shows the effectiveness of the Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis) vaccine for infants whose mothers receive the vaccine during pregnancy. The “Effectiveness of Prenatal Tetanus, Diphtheria, Acellular Pertussis Vaccination in the Prevention of Infant Pertussis in the U.S.” study led by Sylvia Becker-Dreps, MD, MPH, associate professor in the departments of family medicine in the UNC School of Medicine and epidemiology in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, is the first to look at clinical outcomes of the vaccine in infants over the first 18 months of life.Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, is a severe respiratory infection that is especially dangerous for infants and can result in hospitalization or death. It has been increasing in occurrence in the U.S. since 2000. The CDC has long-recommended that children under the age of seven receive doses of the DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis) vaccination through a series of shots. The current series of shots are given at the ages of two, four and six months, followed by two booster doses later in childhood. In 2013, the CDC started recommending that all women receive the Tdap vaccine during every pregnancy in order to pass immunity on to the fetus. That recommendation was based on immunological data showing that maternal anti-pertussis antibodies are transferred to the fetus through the placenta, but not on true clinical outcomes, such as pertussis cases.Becker-Dreps’ study reviewed more than 675,000 pregnancies in the U.S. from 2010-2014 and analyzed insurance claims data to identify the receipt of Tdap during pregnancy. Researchers also looked at hospitalizations and outpatient visits for pertussis in the infants through 18 months of age. The clinical outcomes show that the immunity passed from mother to fetus during pregnancy protected the infant during the first six months of life, before the infant completes the full course of the pertussis vaccine themselves.Related StoriesHPV vaccine has led to a dramatic reduction in cervical cancer rates, but Africa is lagging behindMaternal obesity may negatively affect children’s lung developmentIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyThe study found that in the first six months of life for infants whose mothers were immunized during pregnancy, there was a 75 percent reduction of pertussis hospitalizations and a 46 percent reduction of any pertussis cases. Further, the study did not find that infants whose mothers received the vaccine had a less effective response to their own pertussis vaccine series, as has been suggested by some immunological studies.”This just adds more fuel to the fire for encouraging women to get Tdap during pregnancy,” said Becker-Dreps. “A lot of women are concerned about vaccines in general, but you really might be harming your baby by not getting this vaccine.”Becker-Dreps says they also looked at the timing of immunization during pregnancy, and whether or not that played a role in the effectiveness of the Tdap vaccine in infants.”Our results showed that getting it during the third trimester, but at least two weeks before delivery, is best to optimize the benefits of the vaccine,” Becker-Dreps said.The study found that infants whose mothers received the immunization during the third trimester had a reduction in pertussis, while no benefits of the vaccine were observed when mothers received it earlier in the pregnancy. These findings further reinforce the CDC’s currently recommended “optimal timing” of the Tdap vaccine between 27 and 36 weeks of pregnancy.This is the third and final study in a series by UNC investigators looking at how many women get the Tdap vaccine during pregnancy, its safety and its effectiveness. Becker-Dreps also says that because the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends the Tdap vaccine during pregnancy, it is covered by most insurance policies with a copay.Source: http://www.med.unc.edu/last_img read more

Researchers crack mystery of how embryos are physically constructed

first_img Source:http://www.news.ucsb.edu/2018/019167/careful-you-are-made-glass Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 6 2018Ever wondered how groups of cells managed to build your tissues and organs while you were just an embryo?Using state-of-the-art techniques he developed, UC Santa Barbara researcher Otger Campàs and his group have cracked this longstanding mystery, revealing the astonishing innerworkings of how embryos are physically constructed. Not only does it bring a century-old hypothesis into the modern age, the study and its techniques provide the researchers a foundation to study other questions key to human health, such as how cancers form and spread or how to engineer organs.”In a nutshell, we discovered a fundamental physical mechanism that cells use to mold embryonic tissues into their functional 3D shapes,” said Campàs, a professor of mechanical engineering in UCSB’s College of Engineering who holds the Duncan & Suzanne Mellichamp Chair in Systems Biology. His group investigates how living systems self organize to build the remarkable structures and shapes found in nature.Cells coordinate by exchanging biochemical signals, but they also hold to and push on each other to build the body structures we need to live, such as the eyes, lungs and heart. And, as it turns out, sculpting the embryo is not far from glass molding or 3D printing. In their new work,”A fluid-to-solid jamming transition underlies vertebrate body axis elongation,” published in the journal Nature, Campàs and colleagues reveal that cell collectives switch from fluid to solid states in a controlled manner to build the vertebrate embryo, in a way similar to how we mold glass into vases or 3D print our favorite items. Or, if you like, we 3D print ourselves, from the inside.Most objects begin as fluids. From metallic structures to gelatin desserts, their shape is made by pouring the molten original materials into molds, then cooling them to get the solid objects we use. As in a Chihuly glass sculpture, made by carefully melting portions of glass to slowly reshape it into life, cells in certain regions of the embryo are more active and ‘melt’ the tissue into a fluid state that can be restructured. Once done, cells ‘cool down’ to settle the tissue shape, Campàs explained.”The transition from fluid to solid tissue states that we observed is known in physics as ‘jamming’,” Campàs said. “Jamming transitions are a very general phenomena that happens when particles in disordered systems, such as foams, emulsions or glasses, are forced together or cooled down.”This discovery was enabled by techniques previously developed by Campàs and his group to measure the forces between cells inside embryos, and also to exert miniscule forces on the cells as they build tissues and organs. Using zebrafish embryos, favored for their optical transparency but developing much like their human counterparts, the researchers placed tiny droplets of a specially engineered ferromagnetic fluid between the cells of the growing tissue. The spherical droplets deform as the cells around them push and pull, allowing researchers to see the forces that cells apply on each other. And, by making these droplets magnetic, they also could exert tiny stresses on surrounding cells to see how the tissue would respond.Related StoriesStudy: Megakaryocytes play an important role in cell migrationNANOLIVE‘s novel CX-A defines a new standard for live cell imaging in 96 well plates for continuous organelle monitoring in cell populationsNew study reveals ‘clutch’ proteins responsible for putting T cell activation ‘into gear'”We were able to measure physical quantities that couldn’t be measured before, due to the challenge of inserting miniaturized probes in tiny developing embryos,” said postdoctoral fellow Alessandro Mongera, who is the lead author of the paper.”Zebrafish, like other vertebrates, start off from a largely shapeless bunch of cells and need to transform the body into an elongated shape, with the head at one end and tail at the other,” Campàs said. The physical reorganization of the cells behind this process had always been something of a mystery. Surprisingly, researchers found that the cell collectives making the tissue were physically like a foam (yes, as in beer froth) that jammed during development to ‘freeze’ the tissue architecture and set its shape.These observations confirm a remarkable intuition made by Victorian-era Scottish mathematician D’Arcy Thompson 100 years ago in his seminal work “On Growth and Form.””He was convinced that some of the physical mechanisms that give shapes to inert materials were also at play to shape living organisms. Remarkably, he compared groups of cells to foams and even the shaping of cells and tissues to glassblowing,” Campàs said. A century ago, there were no instruments that could directly test the ideas Thompson proposed, Campàs added, though Thompson’s work continues to be cited to this day.The new Nature paper also provides a jumping-off point from which the Campàs Group researchers can begin to address other processes of embryonic development and related fields, such as how tumors physically invade surrounding tissues and how to engineer organs with specific 3D shapes.”One of the hallmarks of cancer is the transition between two different tissue architectures. This transition can in principle be explained as an anomalous switch from a solid-like to a fluid-like tissue state,” Mongera explained. “The present study can help elucidate the mechanisms underlying this switch and highlight some of the potential druggable targets to hinder it.”last_img read more

New battery design could help store green energy

first_imgSolar and wind power are great, but what happens when the sun sets and the wind dies down? For years, scientists have been trying to create cheap batteries able to store massive amounts of this green energy, which can be fed into power grids when demand is high. One early contender has had to operate at high temperatures, which cause the battery casings to corrode. Now, researchers have come up with a new design that runs at lower temperatures, potentially giving a new generation of batteries the jolt they need to make it to market.Conventional solid-state batteries, such as lithium-ion cells, are able to store lots of power. But their electrodes, which collect and release electricity, are complex to produce, and thus expensive. One alternative for lowering the cost has been to create the electrodes from liquid metals. These are separated from one another by a liquid electrolyte that helps ferry charged ions through the battery as it charges and discharges. The metals and electrolytes in such batteries are selected to have different densities so they naturally partition into three layers that remain separated.An early version created by Donald Sadoway, a materials scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, and colleagues consisted of a top electrode made from liquid magnesium, a bottom electrode of antimony, and a molten salt electrolyte in between. The problem was that keeping all of these materials liquid required heating the battery to nearly 700°C, which caused other battery components to corrode. Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sadoway’s group has explored replacing the magnesium with lithium, which liquefies at just 180°C. But that solves only half of the problem, because antimony must be heated to at least 630°C to liquefy. The team considered adding other metals to the antimony to create alloys that would liquefy at lower temperatures. But earlier work suggested that such alloys would likely generate less electric voltage, which sharply reduces the amount of power a battery can store.Nevertheless, Sadoway and his colleagues forged ahead testing out different antimony-based alloys. And in a paper published online today in Nature, they report that when they added different amounts of lead to their antimony they got a pleasant surprise. When lead makes up as much as 75% of the antimony alloy, the combination liquefies at just 327ºC and retains the high voltage produced by antimony alone. “You’re getting antimonylike behavior far below its melting point,” Sadoway says.Further study revealed that this occurs because as the battery is discharged, lithium atoms in the top electrode give up electrons and migrate through the electrolyte where they bind exclusively with antimony atoms, an arrangement that helps the battery maintain its high voltage. An added benefit, Sadoway notes, is that lead is also much cheaper than antimony, so adding large amounts of lead will likely reduce the battery’s overall cost.“This looks like an important step in the right direction,” says George Crabtree, who directs the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research at Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont, Illinois. He notes that the technology still has a ways to go to reduce efficiency losses that come from operating a battery at high temperatures. But if these losses can be reduced, he says, the batteries have a good shot at making it to market. One key advantage they have, Crabtree notes, is that because the electrodes are liquids and not solids, they are not prone to breaking down during repeated cycles of charging and discharging, a condition that causes the storage capacity of conventional batteries to fade over time. That would enable liquid metal batteries to operate for many years without being replaced, thereby reducing the long-term cost of using them to help stabilize power grids around the world.center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Podcast Bone worms vampire bats and plaquefighting nanoparticles

first_imgDid bone worms feast on ancient marine reptiles? What surprise have scientists found about the diet of vampire bats? And could plaque-busting nanoparticles save you a trip to the dentist? Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm chats about these stories and more with Science’s Susanne Bard. Plus, Evan MacLean discusses the role of oxytocin in mediating the relationship between dogs and people.last_img

QA Will Senate COMPETES bill narrow partisan gap in Congress over US

first_img Email As a conservative Republican from the West and a liberal Democrat from the Midwest, senators Cory Gardner (R–CO) and Gary Peters (D–MI) are separated by geography and ideology. But they see eye-to-eye on the need for the federal government to strengthen its support of basic research.In the next few weeks, the U.S. Senate is expected to begin rewriting a bill governing federal policies toward research, innovation, and science education. And if the stance that Gardner and Peters have taken is any guide, the legislation could help restore a bipartisan consensus on the topic that has been sorely lacking in Congress in recent years.In 2007 the George W. Bush administration and congressional Democrats came together to enact The America COMPETES Act. Designed to ensure that the country remains a global leader in science, the law covered programs at the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Institute of Standards and Technology, research at the Department of Energy (DOE), and interagency activities managed by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. By the time the law expired in 2010, however, Republicans in the House of Representatives had grown wary of many of its provisions, and there were bitter battles over its 2-year reauthorization. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Since its expiration in 2012 (the programs it authorizes are allowed to continue unchanged), efforts to update the law have exposed a deep rift between House Republicans and the scientific community. One year ago last week, the House passed a bill (H.R. 1806) that Democrats unanimously opposed, citing provisions they said would weaken peer review at NSF and hamper its support for the social and geosciences.The House bill so angered lobbyists for science and university groups that many believe no COMPETES bill is better than the House bill. But they are hoping the Senate will come up with compromise language that defuses the debate and allows Congress to make needed changes in other areas.Two senators take the leadThe ball is now in the Senate’s court. Last summer Senator John Thune (R–SD), the chairman of the Senate committee on commerce, science, and transportation, asked freshmen Gardner and Peters to get input from researchers, higher education officials, and industry leaders before drafting a new COMPETES bill. And although neither senator has any background in science—Gardner holds a law degree and Peters worked as a financial adviser before entering politics—the two men have embraced the subject with the zeal of recent converts. Their collaboration on research issues goes beyond co-chairing the roundtables to include jointly sponsored bills that would improve telemedicine in rural areas and strengthen space weather forecasting.Their collegiality may be due in part to their curiously similar political paths. Gardner, 41, and Peters, 57, were both state legislators before winning election to the House; each served only a few terms in the House before jumping to the upper body.At an 11 May committee hearing that explored ways to leverage federal investments in research, Thune promised that the COMPETES reauthorization would be unveiled “in a matter of days.” That schedule has slipped a bit, Gardner told ScienceInsider last week, although he still expects the bill to appear before Congress goes on an extended break in July. (Meanwhile, this week the House voted along party lines to negotiate with the Senate on a broad energy policy bill by combining the DOE provisions of its COMPETES bill with several other energy-related bills passed last year. Last month the Senate approved its version of the energy legislation, S. 2012. Without having seen the final language in the Senate COMPETES bill, science lobbyists are reluctant to speculate on its contents. But in separate interviews last week with ScienceInsider, Gardner and Peters discussed several key issues that the legislation will address. Their comments have been edited for brevity and clarity.Q: Why do basic research?Both men offer ringing endorsements of the government’s role in funding fundamental research. In fact, at first glance, their comments seem interchangeable.Cory Gardner: We had a great hearing [11 March], and I think it was Kelvin Droegemeier [outgoing vice chair of the NSF board] who said that winners are found where we least expect them. And I thought, “Wow, what a great statement.” There are things we do thinking we are going to find this over here, but it was this thing over there that became the big driver of new technologies.Gary Peters: In my mind basic research should be curiosity-driven, and allowed to go where it wants to go. We don’t know what the next big thing will be. And the only way to discover it is to give researchers, driven by curiosity and often pursuing a hunch, the opportunity to pursue those ideas.Listen more closely, however, and a potentially significant difference emerges. For Gardner, basic research should lead to improvements in the health and welfare of the populace. In other words, if taxpayers can’t readily see the payoff, then it shouldn’t be funded. Peters would give scientists a longer leash, but not simply because the ultimate payoff from basic research is sometimes unknowable. Rather, he argues that more knowledge about the natural world is intrinsically valuable.C.G.: So it comes back to what the American people are going to say about the science, and the mission of the National Science Foundation, and what these agencies are targeted to do. And if the American people are unhappy with the direction that they are taking, then that’s going to cause a problem with continuing that line of work. … We’re not just researching things to spend the money. We are researching things because we hope we will find a life-saving advance, or something that will change the world as we know it. And that’s what the American people need to be able to see through the transparency and accountability we’ve built into the legislation.G.P.: No, I don’t think that some disciplines are more important than others. And I think that’s a dangerous, slippery slope to go down, because you don’t know where the research will lead. Some might say we should only support research that can help boost the economy. But in response, I like to cite an example in my home state of Michigan, where some researchers at the University of Michigan were studying the electrical fields on Mars to help NASA prepare for both robotic and human missions to Mars. Now, what has happened is that they’ve formed a company in Ann Arbor that is using some of that knowledge to help electric utility companies manage their grid. So this science for planetary missions turned out to have real-world applications. But to try to anticipate that usage would have been impossible.The difference may be subtle, but it is important in the current political climate. A major bone of contention in the House COMPETES bill was how to interpret the phrase “research in the national interest.” Democrats accused Republicans of using it as a litmus test to exclude research—including work on climate change and across the social and behavioral sciences—that failed to conform to their personal ideology. Republicans defended the language as a common-sense provision that has been around since NSF was created in 1950.Q: How much research is enough?An authorization bill expresses the will of Congress, and its funding levels are often higher than the actual cash delivered by another set of committees that appropriate the money. The House COMPETES bill broke from that tradition, however, by proposing authorizations in 2016 for 2017 that were essentially level to what NSF and DOE science received in 2015.Gardner suggested that the Senate was prepared to do much better than the House. Although he said that fiscal constraints could limit the actual number, he noted that the Senate energy bill would give DOE science an annual boost of 5% through 2020. (The bill did not cover NSF.) Peters says increasing the amount of federally funded basic research is one of his priorities. C.G.: We have a responsibility to be responsible stewards of tax dollars. But if you look at what we were able to do in the energy COMPETES bill, there is precedent for [a healthy increase]. At the same time, we’re going to have to make sure it has the support of 60 senators, so it can get through the Senate and onto the president’s desk. So the money part of it is something we will continue to work on.G.P.: I think we underinvest in basic research. I’ve called for the government to spend 1% of GDP [gross domestic product] on research. Right now it’s about 0.7%. And in going from 0.7% to 1%, I would put a heavy emphasis on basic research.Q: What needs to be done to improve science education and broaden participation?Education was a major focus of the original COMPETES Act. An influential 2005 report by the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine had argued for the importance of training 10,000 new science and math teachers at the elementary and secondary school level “to educate 10 million minds.” And STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education continues to attract bipartisan support.The current COMPETES bills aim to improve coordination of the federal government’s $3-billion-a-year investment in STEM education across more than 100 programs at several agencies. Gardner says the committee has discussed creating a new outside advisory council to the current intragovernmental committee on STEM education, so industry and academic leaders could have a larger voice in shaping federal policies. Peters believes that universities need to pay more attention to improving STEM education in the earliest grades, on topics ranging from teacher training to curriculum development. He also wants them join with the federal government to strengthen efforts aimed at attracting more women and minorities into science.C.G.: We’re thinking of creating a board of experts across the sectors of industry, to identify successful programs and to make recommendations about programs that are working and aren’t working. From what we understand about participation by women and minorities, we need to do a better job of exposing people early in their careers to STEM fields.   G.P.: Part of the problem relates to outreach to young people, even into the elementary schools, to get students excited about STEM. And you’re also seeing a change in pedagogy, more hands-on approach. And sometimes you don’t get that opportunity until later on. We have to actually get into what is happening in our schools. And that’s hard to do, because we have such a decentralized system of education in America.These ideas are embedded in the Next Generation Science Standards, a state-based, private-sector initiative that both Peters and Gardner say they support. But neither Michigan nor Colorado has adopted the standards to date, and neither man thinks the federal government should be playing a direct role in their implementation.C.G.: That’s up to Colorado. That’s not something we should make a decision [on] here. Would they be smart to use it? Yeah, they would.G.P.: It will be up to the states, but legislators like me can talk to state officials and state legislators to try and make some of those changes. And you have to be very diplomatic.Q: How can more academic research be commercialized?Whatever their rationale for supporting basic research, both men think the country needs to do a better job of turning academic discoveries into new products and services. One of the government’s chief tools is the 34-year-old Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, funded by a tax on agencies’ research budgets that some researchers feel is excessive. Earlier this month, for example, the Senate small business panel on which Peters sits voted to nearly double the set-aside over the next decade.The commerce committee has discussed ways to grow SBIR without increasing the set-aside. One idea under consideration is finding other sources of funding; another is a differential structure for taxing individual agencies.C.G.: We’re trying to find new ways to address that challenge. For example, we’ve got an approach to SBIR that would say, “If you’ve got a technology that will save the government money, like reducing Medicare costs, then you should take a portion of those savings and put them back into the SBIR research program.” And putting that money into SBIR would give scientists the incentive to do more commercialization.G.P.: I know some of the universities have pushed back on the SBIR bill, thinking it cuts into basic research. But at the same time they want their professors to become more involved in commercialization, and that happens through SBIR.As for the set-aside, I think we need to revisit that number before it gets to the floor. Right now it’s flat across every agency. But NSF has a different mission than the Department of Defense. And I’m open to having a discussion about what that level should be, and whether it should vary by agency.Q: What can be done to ease the administrative burden on researchers?University administrators are hoping the Senate bill will provide some relief for what they regard as excessive government regulations that come with federal research dollars. Their wish list covers everything from the amount of time devoted to applying for a grant and reporting on the outcomes to telling the government how the institution tracks potential conflicts of interest by faculty members.A report last year from the U.S. National Academies—requested by Senator Lamar Alexander (R–TN) and other legislators involved in crafting previous COMPETES bills—recommended several changes, and Gardner and Peters appear very sympathetic to those arguments. Still, the arcane nature of the issue invites confusion.The most common mistake is mischaracterizing the frequently cited finding that 42% of the time a faculty member charges to a federal grant is spent on administrative tasks, a category that includes supervision of students and postdocs and writing up the results of their research. (Gardner and Peters each wrongly cited that figure as representing the percentage of federal research dollars spent on paperwork rather than on science.) And both men agree any reforms must not weaken accountability.G.P.: What came up a lot with the community is the administrative burden, and the fact that researchers are spending too much time doing paperwork to apply for and maintain their grants. We need to have a more streamlined process than we have now. Especially when we’re not spending enough on basic research, we shouldn’t be having researchers spend so much time on the grants process.C.G.: The other big thing is how to eliminate the cost of compliance. We’ve heard over and over that 42% of every research grant gets spent on bureaucracy, overhead and paperwork, reporting, and those things. The National Academies recently did a report containing some ideas that we’ve tried to incorporate into the bill.Science lobbyists and others will soon find out how closely the views of Gardner and Peters reflect the official legislative language put forward by Thune. That’s when the debate over a new COMPETES law will truly kick into high gear.center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

Obscure microbe may be driving a silent epidemic among cystic fibrosis patients

first_imgIn CF a defect in a gene for a transporter protein involved in mucus production affects many organs and tissues, but its most serious effects are often seen in the lungs. The mucus-filled lungs are prone to infections, which lead to inflammation, which leads to more mucus production, worsening the disease or even suffocating the patient. M. abscessus, rare in healthy people, is notoriously difficult to treat because it is resistant to most antibiotics, O’Sullivan says. “Even when it seems to be gone it can resurface months or years later.”We need to rethink infection control measures within CF centers.Andres Floto, Science study author, Papworth HospitalThe first evidence that CF patients don’t always pick up the microbe at random came in 2013. Researchers discovered that several patients at Papworth Hospital in Cambridge, U.K., were infected with bacteria that were almost identical genetically—something very unlikely to happen if the infections occurred independently. “That told us that there was transmission in one hospital and that was worrying enough,” says geneticist Julian Parkhill of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Hinxton, U.K., who is an author on both the 2013 paper and the new one. “But it didn’t answer two things: How widespread was that transmission? And was it just Papworth or was it happening elsewhere?”To find the answers, the researchers collected more than a thousand M. abscessus isolates from 517 CF patients in the United States, the United Kingdom, Denmark, Sweden, the Netherlands, and Australia. They found that the microbial genomes from some patients differed widely from one another, just as you’d expect with environmental infections. But more than three-quarters of the study’s patients had strains that belonged to “clusters” with very similar genomes—even though some of the patients lived far apart. “There are three major clones,” Parkhill says, “and several others that are emerging and spreading.”The researchers found that bacteria forming part of a cluster were more likely to be taken up by human cells and to survive in them than the microbes without close relatives; the cluster strains also caused more severe disease in mice. This suggests that the microbes have adapted to cause more severe disease in humans, Parkhill says.But though it’s easy to envision spread within a single hospital—for instance through contaminated surfaces or droplets lingering in the air—how long-distance spread could happen is a mystery. CF patients don’t travel much between centers, and equipment doesn’t circulate widely, says study author Andres Floto of Papworth Hospital. It also seems unlikely that the bacteria are carried by an animal or some unknown environmental vehicle; many bacterial genomes are so similar that the spread must have been rapid. “Our most likely explanation (although we have no proof of this yet) is that healthy humans might be acting as vectors of transcontinental spread,” Floto wrote in an email.Erik Böttger, a medical microbiologist at the University of Zurich in Switzerland, says the paper makes a convincing case for spread within hospitals, which he says is important. But more evidence is needed about long-distance spread, Böttger says. He points out that the researchers didn’t collect M. abscessus from the environment; patients in different countries may become infected with very similar bacteria because those are the most common in the environment worldwide, he argues. Parkhill admits that the lack of environmental samples is a weakness, but he points out that the big differences seen among bacterial genomes from patients who didn’t belong to a cluster suggest that M. abscessus genomes in the environment vary widely.Regardless of whether the clones are spreading globally or just locally, “we need to rethink infection control measures within CF centers,” Floto says. At Papworth Hospital, room-cleaning protocols have already been improved, and the ventilation system in a new CF center has been redesigned to completely change the air once every 4 minutes. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Emailcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Caused by a mutation, cystic fibrosis (CF) isn’t contagious, but one serious complication definitely is: infection with Mycobacterium abscessus, an obscure agent related to the microbe that causes tuberculosis. Between 5% and 10% of CF patients become infected, and that number is growing. The bacterium thrives in the excess of thick mucus that builds up in the airways of CF patients—sometimes with fatal results.Until recently, scientists believed that patients picked up the microbe at random, from the soil or water—making infection a case of bad luck. But an analysis of hundreds of bacterial genomes from patients around the world, published in this week’s issue of Science, tells a different story. It suggests that the bacterium has adapted to humans and that several dangerous strains are spreading from one CF treatment center to the next, from country to country, and even between continents in a silent epidemic.The researchers have no good explanation for this unexpected mobility, and not everyone is convinced. But other CF experts say the study shows that hospitals need to do more to reduce the infection risk for their patients. “This has huge implications for CF center isolation and cleansing protocols,” says Brian O’Sullivan of the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College.last_img read more

Announcing the winner of this years Dance Your PhD contest

first_imgWhy do they do it? The $2500 in cash prizes probably doesn’t hurt. But the main reasons, according to a survey of the contestants, range from edging out their nondancing peers to winning scholarships to finding love. Whatever the motivation, we all end up with some truly stunning videos. It’s not enough to do good research. You have to communicate it—not just to the other people in your academic department, but to anyone. That can be difficult if, for example, you work in an abstract branch of mathematics. A long talk full of equations won’t cut it. Sometimes you need to pull out science’s most powerful and top-secret communication tool: interpretive dance.That’s exactly what Nancy Scherich did. Her Ph.D. research at the University of California, Santa Barbara, is in topology, the study of geometry in which shape and size don’t matter. Her focus is on braid theory; she spends her days “with paper and pencil” to find the rules that determine the unique representations of twists and knots in high-dimensional spaces. So naturally, she created a dance to explain it with aerial silk acrobatics and glowing hula hoops. Look for the mathematical plot twist. (Spoiler alert: It involves linear algebra and murder!)Scherich is the overall winner of this year’s “Dance Your Ph.D.” contest. This is the 10th year of a challenge laid down by Science and AAAS for researchers to explain their work with dance moves. Scherich is joined by three other researchers who won in their scientific categories with dances explaining their work on sea star ecology, the psychology of creativity, and the biochemistry of criminal forensics. That last one, by Natália Oliveira at the Federal University of Pernambuco in Recife, Brazil, is also the winner of our online audience favorite award. In all, 53 scientists from around the world submitted dances. This year’s judges:Katrien Kolenberg, Astrophysicist at the University of Leuven in Belgium and inaugural Ph.D. dancerCarl Flink, Choreographer and director of the Black Label Movement and professor at the University of Minnesota in MinneapolisAlexa Meade, Artist and visual engineerKieran Gourley, Mathematician and professional ballet dancer in Sydney, AustraliaMatt Kent, Emily Kent, Renée Jaworski, Pilobolus BiologyMonica Moritsch from the University of California, Santa Cruz, with “Intertidal community consequences of sea star wasting syndrome.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By John BohannonNov. 1, 2017 , 9:00 AM Social sciencesJudit Pétervári from Queen Mary University of London with “The evaluation of creative ideas—analyzing the differences between expert and novice judges.”center_img Email Chemistry, People’s ChoiceNatália Oliveira from the Federal University of Pernambuco in Recife, Brazil, with “Development of biosensors for forensic sciences applications.” Announcing the winner of this year’s ‘Dance Your Ph.D.’ contest Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Watch a rigged game of tugofwar inside the egg cells of mammals

first_imgWatch a rigged game of tug-of-war inside the egg cells of mammals By Roni DenglerNov. 6, 2017 , 12:10 PM There’s a tug-of-war going on inside reproductive cells. When females make an egg, they can only donate half of each of their chromosome pairs (the other half comes from dad). But how does the cell choose which one? Using fluorescently tagged proteins to watch cell division in mouse egg cells, researchers have discovered that repetitive sequences of DNA near the center of chromosomes—known as centromeres—can either be “strong” or “weak,” they report in Science. Strong centromeres have more places for the so-called spindle fibers that pull chromosome copies apart in cell division to attach, but they don’t operate by brute force. Instead, strong centromeres get what they want by cheating: If their chromosome is oriented in such a way that it’s likely to get discarded rather than reach the egg, the strong centromere lets go of its spindle fibers, causing its counterpart centromere to release its hold, too, and the game starts over. This way the strong centromere can re-orient itself toward the side that will become the egg. So what makes some centromeres stronger than others? Researchers say stronger centromeres are “bigger”—they repeat the same DNA sequence many more times than weak centromeres might—and they are more sensitive to which direction the spindle fibers are pulling them. That makes them more likely to let go when things aren’t going their way, and thus rig the tug-of-war.last_img read more

Podcast Mysterious fast radio bursts and longlasting effects of childhood cancer treatments

first_imgESO/L. Calçada Host Sarah Crespi talks with Staff Writer Daniel Clery about the many, many theories surrounding fast radio bursts—extremely fast, intense radio signals from outside the galaxy—and a new telescope coming online that may help sort them out.Also this week, Sarah talks with Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel about her story on researchers’ attempts to tackle the long-term effects of pediatric cancer treatment. The survival rate for some pediatric cancers is as high as 90%, but many survivors have a host of health problems. Jennifer’s feature is part of a special section on pediatric cancer.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Download a transcript (PDF)Listen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcast[Image: ESO/L. Calçada; Music: Jeffrey Cook]last_img read more

First fossil jaw of Denisovans finally puts a face on elusive human

first_img Thirty-nine years ago, a Buddhist monk meditating in a cave on the edge of the Tibetan Plateau found something strange: a human jawbone with giant molars. The fossil eventually found its way to scientists. Now, almost 4 decades later, a groundbreaking new way to identify human fossils based on ancient proteins shows the jaw belonged to a Denisovan, a mysterious extinct cousin of Neanderthals.The jawbone is the first known fossil of a Denisovan outside of Siberia’s Denisova Cave in Russia, and gives paleoanthropologists their first real look at the face of this lost member of the human family. “We are finally ‘cornering’ the elusive Denisovans,” paleoanthropologist María Martinón-Torres of the National Research Center on Human Evolution in Burgos, Spain, wrote in an email. “We are getting their smiles!”Together, the jaw’s anatomy and the new method of analyzing ancient proteins could help researchers learn whether other mysterious fossils in Asia are Denisovan. “We now can use this fossil and this wonderful new tool to classify other fossil remains that we can’t agree on,” says paleoanthropologist Aida Gomez-Robles of University College London, who reviewed the paper, which appears in Nature this week. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email The proteins in this lower jawbone identify it as Denisovan. By Ann GibbonsMay. 1, 2019 , 1:00 PM First fossil jaw of Denisovans finally puts a face on elusive human relatives DONGJU ZHANG/LANZHOU UNIVERSITY Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) A jawbone was found by a Chinese monk in a holy cave high on the Tibetan Plateau.  The international team of researchers also reports that the jawbone is at least 160,000 years old. Its discovery pushes back the earliest known presence of humans at high altitude by about 120,000 years.A massive search for Denisovans has been underway ever since paleogeneticists extracted DNA from the pinkie of a girl who lived more than 50,000 years ago in Denisova Cave and found she was a new kind of human. Max Planck Society researchers have since sequenced DNA from several Denisovans from the cave, but the fossils—isolated teeth and bits of bone—were too scanty to show what this enigmatic hominin looked like. Denisovans must have been widespread, because many living people in Melanesia and Southeast Asia carry traces of DNA from multiple encounters between modern humans and Denisovans. But although intriguing fossils across Asia could be Denisovan, they have not yielded the DNA that could confirm their identity.Enter the new jawbone, found by an unidentified monk in Baishiya Karst Cave in Xiahe county in China at an altitude of 3200 meters on the margins of the Tibetan Plateau, according to co-author Dongju Zhang, an archaeologist at Lanzhou University in northwestern China. She traced the jawbone’s discovery by interviewing local people in Xiahe, who told her they remembered human bones from the large cave, which is next to a Buddhist shrine and is still a holy place as well as a tourist attraction. Recognizing the jaw’s unusual nature, the monk gave it to the sixth Gung-Thang living Buddha, one of China’s officially designated “living Buddhas,” who consulted scholars and then gave the jaw to Lanzhou University. The jawbone was so “weird” that researchers there didn’t know how to classify it, and it sat on shelves for years, Zhang says. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country DONGJU ZHANG/LANZHOU UNIVERSITY She and geologist Fahu Chen, also from Lanzhou University and the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research in Beijing, showed the jaw to paleoanthropologist Jean-Jacques Hublin of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. After seeing its large molars—as big as ones found in Denisova Cave—Hublin immediately suspected it was Denisovan.Max Planck paleogeneticists couldn’t get DNA from the jaw, but Hublin’s graduate student Frido Welker had found in his doctoral work that Neanderthals, modern humans, and Denisovans differ in the amino acid sequence of key proteins. Welker, now a postdoc at the University of Copenhagen, was able to extract collagen, a common structural protein, from a molar of the Xiahe jawbone. He found its amino acid sequence most closely matched that of Denisovans.Other team members dated a carbonate crust that had formed on the skull by measuring the radioactive decay of uranium in the carbonate. They got a date of 160,000 years ago—a “firm minimum date” for the skull, says geochronologist Rainer Grün of Griffith University in Nathan, Australia, who is not a member of the team.The date suggests Denisovans would have had tens of thousands of years to adapt to the altitude of Tibet by the time modern humans arrived in the region, some 30,000 to 40,000 years ago. Encounters between modern humans and Denisovans adapted to high altitude could explain how the Tibetans of today came by a Denisovan gene that helps them cope with thin air. “It seems likely that ancestral Tibetans interacted with Denisovans, as they began to move upslope,” archaeologist David Madsen of the University of Texas in Austin wrote in an email.The jaw’s features could be a template for spotting other Denisovans. “Its distinct large molars and premolar roots differ from those of Neanderthals,” and the jawbone “is very primitive and robust,” says Hublin, who sees a resemblance to a jawbone found off the coast of Taiwan known as the Penghu mandible.What anatomy can’t confirm, proteins might. “The protein analyses allow us to see landscapes where DNA cannot reach”—from warmer climates or much more ancient sites where fragile DNA doesn’t persist, Martinón-Torres says. Other researchers have a half-dozen fossils they want to test for proteins or compare with the Xiahe jaw.The implications are far-reaching. “Forget the textbooks,” says archaeologist Robin Dennell of the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom. “Human evolution in Asia is far more complex than we currently understand, and probably does involve multiple lineages, some of which probably engaged with our species.”Meanwhile, Chen and Zhang did their first excavation at the cave in December 2018, with permission from local villagers and Buddhists. They dug two small trenches where they have already found stone tools and cut-marked rhino and other animal bones. “We do have hope we’ll find more Denisovans,” Zhang says.last_img read more

Podcast Creating chimeras for organ transplants and how bats switch between their

first_img Researchers have been making animal embryos from two different species, so-called “chimeras,” for years, by introducing stem cells from one species into a very early embryo of another species. The ultimate goal is to coax the foreign cells into forming an organ for transplantation. But questions abound: Can evolutionarily distant animals, like pigs and humans, be mixed together to produce such organs? Or could species closely related to us, like chimps and macaques, stand in for tests with human cells? Staff Writer Kelly Servick joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the research, the regulations, and the growing ethical debate.Also this week, Sarah talks with Yossi Yovel of the School of Zoology and the Sagol School of Neuroscience at Tel Aviv University in Israel about his work on sensory integration in bats. Writing in Science Advances, he and his colleagues show through several clever experiments when bats switch between echolocation and vision. Yossi and Sarah discuss how these trade-offs in bats can inform larger questions about our own perception.For our monthly books segment, Science books editor Valerie Thompson talks with Lucy Jones of the Seismological Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena about a song she created, based on 130 years of temperature data, for an instrument called the “viola de gamba.” Read more on the Books et al. blog.Download a transcript (PDF)This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Ads on the show: MagellanTV; KiwiCoListen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcast[Image: The Legend Kay/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook] The Legend Kay/Flickr last_img read more

Japanese government punts on decision to host the International Linear Collider

first_img The government of Japan finally said something about hosting the International Linear Collider (ILC): It still can’t make up its mind, and it may hold off on a decision until the fall, if not longer.This morning in Tokyo, an official of Japan’s Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) explained to a meeting of the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) and the Linear Collider Board that the ministry could “not yet” indicate the intention of “hosting the ILC in Japan,” according to a written executive summary of the presentation obtained by ScienceInsider. “MEXT will continue to discuss the ILC project with other governments while having an interest in the ILC project,” the summary concludes. “There was disappointment” among the scientists at the meeting, ICFA chair Geoffrey Taylor, an experimental physicist at the University of Melbourne in Australia admitted at a briefing this evening in Tokyo. “People were hoping there would be a statement that Japan was willing to host the ILC.” Japanese government punts on decision to host the International Linear Collider © Rey.Hori/KEK By Dennis NormileMar. 7, 2019 , 12:20 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Japanese physicists in particular were hoping for positive news. In December 2018, the influential Science Council of Japan (SCJ) concluded in a report that it could not “reach a consensus to support hosting” the project, citing concerns over Japan’s share of the cost of the $7.5 billion machine and unresolved technical issues. Since then, regional politicians, industrial lobbyists, civic groups, and chambers of commerce have argued in favor of hosting the collider, which they hope will stimulate economic development in the region hit by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami.The ILC is designed to produce Higgs bosons in sufficient quantities to determine the properties of the elusive particle, experimentally confirmed in 2012. “Having a Higgs factory is the No. 1 idea in particle physics right now,” Taylor explained. Japan had emerged as the leading contender to host the ILC after preliminary cost estimates scared off other countries.Taylor tried to put a positive spin on the situation, noting that “this is not a dead end.” In a letter presented to the Linear Collider Board, Keisuke Isogai, director-general of MEXT’s research promotion bureau in Tokyo, explained that a commitment might still be possible if the ILC gains “understanding and support from the domestic academic community,” particularly in the context of a “Master Plan of Large Research Projects” now being considered by SCJ. Given the council’s skepticism about the project, “We will show them that we already have solutions for the technical challenges and we are going to start making a framework for international cost-sharing,” said Masanori Yamauchi, director-general of KEK, Japan’s high energy research center in Tsukuba.A draft of the master plan is due in the fall, with a final recommendation from SCJ coming in about a year. “We’re still very hopeful that in not too long a time we will end up with a positive response to hosting the ILC” from Japan, Taylor said, though he noted that further delays could diminish the importance of the ILC given nascent competing proposals for other Higgs factories. A cryomodule, a key component of the proposed International Linear Collider Emaillast_img read more

Rare Blue Pigment Found in Medieval Womans Teeth has Historians Excited

first_imgTeeth reveal all manner of things about our health, and it’s no surprise that archaeologists often rely on evidence from teeth and bones in order to draw conclusions about the lives of our ancestors. However, the discovery of a blue-stained tooth in the corpse of a medieval nun has left historians particularly excited about the possible implications.An interdisciplinary team of archaeologists, anthropologists, historians and scientists recently published a groundbreaking study in which they report that bright blue deposits were found in the teeth of a medieval nun at a monastery in Dalheim, Germany.Photo Courtesy Christina WarinnerAccording to the report, published in the journal Science Advances, this particular woman had an astonishing number of ultramarine flecks in her mouth, which appeared to have accumulated over many years.Further analysis revealed that the blue flecks were actually lapis lazuli, a rare and vibrant blue pigment found only in an area of Afghanistan.This rare and expensive material was used in the production of lavishly decorated manuscripts, and was reserved for only the most important texts.Photo by John Moore/Getty ImagesBlue is a notoriously difficult color to manufacture, and the brilliant, bright hue created by lapis lazuli was in high demand for exceptional works of art.Lapis lazuli was imported from Afghanistan, ground into a powder and mixed with water to make a pigment, which was then carefully applied to illustrated manuscripts by trained scribes.Only the most accomplished and experienced scribes would be trusted to handle such a rare substance; it was at least as expensive as gold and much more difficult to find.Lapis lazuli block. Photo by Luna04 CC BY-SA 3.0According to the report in Science Advances, the team found that the teeth contained many flecks of lapis lazuli that had become embedded in the dental calculus, hardened plaque that gathers on the teeth over the course of a lifetime.Furthermore, the pattern of these deposits was consistent with a licking motion, as if they had accumulated when the scribe licked the end of her brush with her tongue.Analysis of the corpse indicated that this particular scribe was female, and aged between 45 and 60 years old when she died. Aside from the extraordinary amount of lapis lazuli they found in her mouth, the team agreed that she was an otherwise normal and healthy woman.Radiocarbon dating techniques revealed that she was alive sometime between 997 and 1162, during a period in which European monasteries were flourishing.Monasteries were a hotbed of artistic activity in medieval Europe, and all kinds of religious, liturgical and historical texts were produced in these institutions.Dalheim Church of St. Peter and women’s monastery. Photo Courtesy C. Warriner et al., 2019/Science AdvanceManuscript illustration is one of the most elaborate and beautiful forms of medieval art, and these objects represent labors of love created by skilled scribes trained in the religious community.It has often been assumed that the majority of scribes who produced these beautiful works of art would have been men. Some historians have even gone so far as to suggest that women would have been prohibited from illustrating important manuscripts in this period.Photo Courtesy C. Warinner (A); M. Tromp and A. Radini (B to I).More recently, however, important work by historians such as Alison Beach has shown that female scribes were much more prevalent in European monasteries than has previously been assumed.Part of the difficulty in identifying female scribes is due to the fact that the majority of medieval texts were produced anonymously, and even those that were signed rarely include a female name.As a result, this discovery marks an important breakthrough. It provides concrete evidence that women were involved in the production of some of the most important manuscripts produced in religious foundations, as lapis lazuli would have been reserved for only the most special texts.Photo Courtesy A. Radini, E. Tong, R. Kröger.It also may point to the significance of the monastery at Dalheim as a center of manuscript production. Prior to this research, very little was known about the monastery and what went on within its walls.The study is also important in showing the movement of exotic goods on long distance trade routes from Asia, and the ways in which they were used in Western European societies.This supplements recent research that attests to the connections that existed between Europe, the Middle East and Central Asia in the medieval period, and emphasizes the vitality of medieval trading routes.Read another story from us: Incredible Forest ‘Crop Circles’ Appear in JapanThe members of the team are particularly hopeful about the possibility of applying the techniques developed in this study to other contexts. Who knows what else could be revealed by analyzing medieval teeth?last_img read more

Government currently assisting over 500 students to study abroad

first_imgShareTweetSharePinSaint Jean spoke at a meeting with the students who received assistance for 2019-2020The government of Dominica is currently assisting a total of 578 young Dominicans to further their education at various learning institutions abroad.Education Minister Petter Saint Jean made the disclosure while addressing a meeting at the Newtown Primary School on Tuesday with students who have received financial assistance for the academic year 2019-2020. Close to 350 students are leaving to study abroad this year.“It is actually 578 young Dominicans that the government of Dominica is actually paying tuition, housing, in some cases tuition only and some of them on full scholarships,” Saint Jean said.The last financial year ended in June but according to Saint Jean, it is expected that the 2019-220 budget will be presented in parliament “somewhere about end of July, early August…I cannot give you the exact date.”He said the Prime Minister and Minister for Finance, Roosevelt Skerrit must approve some of the scholarships, “even before we go to parliament and approve the budget.”Saint Jean revealed that for this new financial year 2019-2020, the government has already given a commitment amounting to more than $10 million.“So even before we’ve gone to parliament, we have a commitment to young Dominicans…,” he stated. “We have already given commitment amounting to $10.9 million.”A large number of students attending the meetinglast_img read more

US India Japan Australia for ASEANled mechanism to promote rulesbased order in

first_img“They highlighted their efforts to maintain universal respect for international law and freedom of navigation and overflight,” the statement said, adding the officials agreed to continue to explore opportunities to enhance cooperation, including in support of regional disaster response, cybersecurity, maritime security, counterterrorism, and nonproliferation.The ASEAN region along with India accounts for 1.85 billion people, which is one fourth of the global population and their combined GDP has been estimated at over USD 3.8 trillion. More Explained Post Comment(s) Planned Parenthood, seeking more political tack, removes its president Leana Wen The ASEAN comprises Singapore, Brunei, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, Indonesia, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia and Myanmar. Chandrayaan-2 gets new launch date days after being called off Advertising Best Of Express By PTI |Washington | Published: June 1, 2019 5:16:12 pm P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies Advertising ASEAN, Japan, Indian Ocean, China, Australia, United States, Vietnam, World news, Indian Express The ASEAN region along with India accounts for 1.85 billion people, which is one fourth of the global population and their combined GDP has been estimated at over USD 3.8 trillion. (Source: MEA/Twitter)The US, India, Australia and Japan collectively came out in strong support of an ASEAN-led mechanism to preserve and promote rules-based order in the Indo-Pacific region where China is flexing its muscles. Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 In November 2017, India, the US, Australia and Japan gave shape to the long-pending “Quad” Coalition to develop a new strategy for keeping the critical sea routes in the Indo-Pacific free of any influence.China has been trying to expand its military presence in the Indo-Pacific, which is a biogeographic region, comprising the Indian Ocean and the western and central Pacific Ocean, including the South China Sea.China claims almost all of the South China Sea. Vietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia, Brunei and Taiwan have counter claims over the sea.During the meeting, the four nations reaffirmed their shared commitment to preserve and promote the rules-based order in the region. “Participants also noted their desire to work with like-minded partners and allies to promote a transparent, rules-based approach to trans-boundary challenges,” the statement said.The four countries underscored their intent to continue regular consultations on Indo-Pacific engagement and initiatives together and with other interested nations and institutions.They underscored their intent to continue close coordination and collaboration in support of sustainable, private sector-led development, maritime security, and good governance, it said.The Quad coalition also discussed initiatives undertaken by each country to encourage transparent, principles-based investment in quality infrastructure in accordance with international standards and leverage the potential of the private sector. Republicans offer little criticism of Trump’s comments on Democratic Congresswomen Senior officials of the four countries, at a meeting in Bangkok in F riday, also highlighted their efforts to maintain universal respect for international law and freedom of navigation and overflight in the region, an official US statement said.Welcoming ASEAN’s efforts to develop an Indo-Pacific outlook, the four countries affirmed their strong support for ASEAN centrality and ASEAN-led regional architecture, as well as their support for other regional institutions, including the Indian Ocean Rim Association and Pacific Islands Forum, it said.The 10-nation Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is considered one of the most influential groupings in the region and India and several other countries including the US, China, Japan and Australia are its dialogue partners. Related News After heated exchanges, US House condemns tweets by Donald Trump as racist Taking stock of monsoon rain Advertisinglast_img read more

Crossexamination ends Reserve my right for further legal action in future MJ

first_imgAkbar told the court: “It is wrong to suggest that the article and tweets of Priya Ramani were meant to raise awareness of the pervasiveness of the issue of sexual harassment at workplace. It is wrong to suggest that Priya Ramani’s disclosures pertaining to me were true and made in good faith.”John cross-examined Akbar on allegations by three other women journalists — Pallavi Gogoi, Ruth David, and Prerna Singh Bindra.Asked whether he was aware of an article written by Gogoi in The Washington Post last November, Akbar told the court that he was “made aware and denied the allegations”. After Gogoi’s article, Akbar and wife Mallika had released a public statement each to ANI.“It is wrong to suggest that my response to the article was based on legal advice to preempt any action against me. I have not filed any case of defamation against Gogoi and The Washington Post,” he said.Asked about the article by David, he told the court, “I am not aware, nor have I read any article by Ruth David recounting several instances of sexual misconduct on my part. If any such article is written, it is wrong; and the allegations, if any, are denied.”Akbar was also shown Bindra’s tweets, to which he replied, “I was not aware about these tweets earlier.” As the cross-examination ended, John asked Akbar whether he was aware that the #MeToo movement began on social media. While this was objected to by his counsel, ACMM Samar Vishal said, “He is a journalist. He can answer.” Akbar then said he was “not aware whether the Me Too movement started on social media but was aware that the #MeToo movement began”. #MeToo: Never met Priya Ramani in hotel room, says MJ Akbar Akbar told the court that he is aware fact that several women had made allegations against him when he filed the complaint.“I have not filed any complaint of defamation against any other person, Indian or international publication, web portal, Twitter or Vogue magazine. I reserve my rights to take legal actions against any other person, or any other person or above mentioned entities, in future,” Akbar submitted before Additional Chief Metropolitan Magistrate Samar Vishal.In 2018, in the midst of the #MeToo movement against sexual harassment and sexual assault, several women had levelled allegations of sexual misconduct and harassment against Akbar. Following allegations by Ramani and others, Akbar resigned as Union Minister of State for External Affairs.He later filed a defamation case against Ramani.Akbar’s cross-examination went on for about 90 minutes in a packed courtroom, which saw heated exchanges between his senior counsel, Geeta Luthra, and Ramani’s counsel, senior advocate Rebecca M John. Journalist Priya Ramani gets bail in defamation case filed by M J Akbar Advertising 4 Comment(s) Written by Anand Mohan J, Somya Lakhani | New Delhi | Updated: July 7, 2019 5:11:08 am Related News Advertising #MeToo tweets affected public reputation, MJ Akbar tells court mj akbar, mj akbar resigns, akbar resigns, akbar quits, mj akbar #metoo, #MeToo akbar, sexual harassment, mj akbar priya ramani, #meToo, MJ Akbar latest news, Minister of State for External Affairs M J Akbar arrives at Delhi airport Sunday. (Express photo by Prem Nath Pandey)Former Union minister M J Akbar’s cross-examination in a defamation case he filed against journalist Priya Ramani concluded on Saturday, in which he told the court: “It is wrong to suggest that I have been selective in filing this complaint only against Priya Ramani in order to target her and create an all-around chilling effect.”last_img read more

Climate change poses major threat to United States new government report concludes

first_imgThat is the sobering message sent by a major federal report released today that examines climate change impacts on different U.S. regions, economic sectors, and ecosystems.“Earth’s climate is now changing faster than at any point in the history of modern civilization, primarily as a result of human activities,” the report concludes. “The impacts of global climate change are already being felt in the United States and are projected to intensify in the future—but the severity of future impacts will depend largely on actions taken to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt to the changes that will occur.” By David MalakoffNov. 23, 2018 , 2:00 PM Climate change poses major threat to United States, new government report concludes Climate change is already being felt in communities across the United States, and will cause growing harm to the economy, infrastructure, and human and ecological health—unless the United States and other nations take concerted action to reduce emissions of warming gases and adapt to a warmer world. Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson (D–TX), who is expected become the chair of the House science committee in January 2019, said in a statement that the report’s conclusions, “as we’ve sadly grown accustomed to, are quite terrifying—increased wildfires, more damaging storms, dramatic sea level rise, more harmful algal blooms, disease spread, dire economic impacts, the list goes on and on. That being said, all hope is not lost, but we must act now. We have to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, work on adaptation and mitigation, and explore technology solutions such as geoengineering and carbon capture and sequestration.”The 29-chapter report, formally known as Volume II of the Fourth National Climate Assessment, is a follow-up to the assessment’s first volume, released a year ago, which summarized the state of climate science. The reports are required by a 1990 law that orders federal agencies to report at least every 4 years on the status and potential impacts of climate change. They were assembled by some 300 experts, about half of whom work outside the federal government. The process of preparing the report, which was led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, involved collecting public comment at events in more than 40 cities.Over the past year, some climate advocates had expressed concern that the Trump administration would attempt to alter or censor the report. But federal scientists emphasized that there was no outside interference. “The report has not been altered in any way to reflect political considerations,” said Virginia Burkett, a climate scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey who worked on the effort. Many climate advocates have noted, however, that the administration chose to release the report late on the Friday after Thanksgiving, when the attention of the public and the press may be elsewhere.“How many wake-up calls do we need?” Carol Werner, executive director of the Environmental and Energy Study Institute, a policy nonprofit in Washington, D.C., asked in a statement. “Every new National Climate Assessment has built on the previous one, confirming that climate change is already happening and that we need to act. Time is running out. … Sadly, the fact that the administration released this important report on the Friday after Thanksgiving clearly shows its desire to squelch its impact.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The report also comes just weeks before Democrats are poised to take control of the U.S. House of Representatives. Incoming House leaders have promised to make climate change a priority, and have already announced a series of hearings early next year on the topic. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img The new report is designed to be “policy relevant,” but does not make specific policy recommendations, federal officials associated with the U.S. Global Change Research Program in Washington, D.C., noted in a teleconference today. Still, its findings offer a stark contrast to positions taken by President Donald Trump and many of his top officials. They have repeatedly downplayed or rejected warnings from experts that climate change poses a serious threat to national security. And the administration plans to withdraw from the Paris climate accord, an international effort to cut emissions of warming gases, and has moved to roll back a wide array of domestic climate regulations. Efforts to address climate change “have expanded in the last five years, but not at the scale needed to avoid substantial damages to the economy, environment, and human health over the coming decades,” it states. And without “substantial and sustained global efforts,” climate change will “cause growing losses to American infrastructure and property and impede the rate of economic growth over this century.” U.S. gross domestic product could be reduced by 10% or more under some scenarios, with annual losses in some economic sectors reaching “hundreds of billions of dollars by the end of the century—more than the current gross domestic product (GDP) of many U.S. states.” Earth’s atmosphere from the International Space Station Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe NASA last_img read more

Daughter hounded by UP MLA Want to inspire girls forced to follow

first_img sakshi mishra, up mla daughter, Daughter ‘hounded’ by UP MLA, up mla daughter video, up mla daughter marries dalit, ajitesh kumar, Bidri Chainpur constituency, Bareilly mla Sakshi and Ajitesh got married on June 4.Stating that she is “glad” of having taken the decision on her own, Sakshi Mishra, daughter of a BJP MLA from Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh, who accused her father and brother of allegedly threatening her and her husband, a Dalit man, on Friday said that many girls across the country do just what their families want and she hopes to inspire them. Related News 15 Comment(s) Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence Written by Amil Bhatnagar, Ashna Butani | Bareilly | Published: July 13, 2019 2:10:44 am After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Three women among nine killed as land dispute leads to firing in UP village Muzaffarnagar: 12 booked for assaulting Imam, ‘forcing’ him to chant ‘Jai Shri Ram’ Hounded for marrying Dalit, woman tells UP MLA: Papa, stop your dogs center_img Advertising Best Of Express Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Sakshi, 23, and husband Ajitesh Kumar, 29, have appealed the court, the police and the public to seek protection from her father Rajesh Mishra, the MLA from Bidri Chainpur constituency in Bareilly, claiming that they fear having become a target by virtue of their marriage.Two days ago, a video went viral on social media in which Sakshi claimed that her father was threatening them of dire consequences since he allegedly did not approve of their wedding.On Friday, the family had a reunion of sorts in TV studios, with the couple and Ajitesh’s father, Harish Kumar, faced with MLA Mishra and Rajeeva Rana, his alleged aide. Mishra maintained that he did not want to meddle with their marital affairs and that he did not threaten them. In Delhi, Sakshi told The Indian Express that Ajitesh was her brother Vikky Bhartol’s friend, and that she knew him since ninth grade. “When no one at home would understand me, he was there for support. We saw each other often…. We took a collective decision to get married since my family was otherwise planning my wedding. My family was not very hard on me, but they never tried to understand me or what I wanted to do — they just wanted me to graduate so that I can get married after that.”She also said, “I want to contact my mother, but I am afraid that my father will track me.”In Bareilly, a close friend of Ajitesh said, “Vikky and Ajitesh were friends — they studied the same course. Ajitesh (regularly) visited their home, and the two families were aware of the friendship. Sakshi was pursuing a course in Jaipur…. He (Ajitesh) belongs to a humble family – they fell in love and decided to marry; there were no bad intentions.”Ajitesh’s father is a manager in Vijaya Bank. His mother, who was a government school teacher, died a few years ago. Ajitesh deals in properties and runs a showroom of tiles in Bareilly. He is also related to Dr Shyam Bihari Lal, BJP legislator from Faridpur, in Bareilly, local residents said.According to Ajitesh’s neighbours, he has not been home since July 4. Three days ago, the other family members also left. Two days ago, his father Harish Kumar called up neighbour to arrange for a security guard outside their home since it was lying vacant.Bareilly SSP Muni Raj said the police learnt from social media that a married couple was seeking police protection. “We are ready to provide every level of security. We have not received any written application yet. The MLA wrote to us that she had been missing, which was also investigated. We had earlier placed a picket at the boy’s house. Necessary steps will be taken as we receive in writing.”MLA Mishra told the media: “She is an adult capable of making her own decisions. I cannot say or do anything about it. Yes, I was concerned when she had gone missing, but even then I did not send men after her. People are asking me if she is welcome home. After marriage, she has to live with her in-laws. So there is no question of that either.” Advertisinglast_img read more