Monthly Archives: August 2019

Nanoscale Coaxial Cables for Solar Energy Harvesting
Nanoscale Coaxial Cables for Solar Energy Harvesting

first_imgOne overarching problem is that current semiconducting materials with the potential for use in renewable energy devices lack one key characteristic. When electrons in these materials are excited by light and jump to higher energy levels (leaving vacancies, known as “holes,” in the lower levels), both the electrons and the holes typically move around in the same region. Thus, they tend to recombine. This is desirable for certain applications, such as light-emitting devices, where electron-hole recombination produces light, but is not ideal for renewable energy devices. A better scenario is the separation of the excited electrons from the holes such that, in the case of solar cells, for example, the electrons can be drawn off and used for electricity.“Our nanowires were designed to provide this feature, along with a superior electrical conductivity,” said NREL materials scientist Yong Zhang, the study’s corresponding researcher, to PhysOrg.com. “Both of these properties are critical in order for renewable energy devices to reach their ultimate efficiency limits.”Conventional coaxial cables consist of a central copper wire symmetrically surrounded by a braided copper conductor, with an insulating spacer material between the two. The braid serves as a return route for electrons that have already passed down the core wire; it can equally be viewed as a channel for holes moving in the opposite direction. The insulator separates the charge passing through the wire and braid.Mimicking this structure, the group designed a nanoscale version consisting of a central wire, the “core,” surrounded by a shell (the shell is not cylindrical like conventional cables, but rather is hexagonal). The researchers used two semiconducting materials: gallium nitride (GaN) and gallium phosphide (GaP). They made two samples, one with a GaN core and GaP shell, and another with a GaP core and GaN shell. Both wires are approximately four nanometers in diameter (according to Zhang, this particular size was chosen by considering the computational effort needed to analyze the wires’ properties, because larger wires, while easier to make, require considerably more computing power and time to model. Similar success, he says, could be achieved with nanowires up to 10-15 nanometers in diameter). In neither sample is an insulating spacer required. This phenomenon is the result of the specific semiconducting behaviors of GaN and GaP. Scientists have designed a new type of nanowire – a tiny coaxial cable – that could vastly improve a few key renewable energy technologies, particularly solar cells, and could even impact other cutting-edge, developing technologies, such as quantum computing and nanoelectronics. Figure 1: A cross-section of a conventional coaxial cable Citation: Nanoscale ‘Coaxial Cables’ for Solar Energy Harvesting (2007, April 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-04-nanoscale-coaxial-cables-solar-energy.html The nanowire, developed by researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, may solve several problems currently associated with renewable energy applications. Explore furthercenter_img Figure 2: A cross-section of the nanoscale coaxial cable, in which nitrogen, phosphorus, and gallium atoms are shown in blue, yellow, and magenta, respectively. White spheres represent hydrogen atoms, which help render the surface of the wire chemically non-reactive. Can Switzerland succeed without fossil fuels? GaN and GaP, like all semiconductors, are classified by “band gap” – how much energy is required for electrons in the material to jump from the top of the “valence band,” a range of energies for which they don’t participate in conduction, to the bottom of the “conduction band,” a range for which they do participate. When GaN and GaP are combined into a wire, the structure as a whole assumes its own band gap, which is very different from that of either component but much more appropriate for solar energy applications. Besides providing efficient charge separation, the design may be able to remedy several shortcomings of solar-energy applications. For example, they could help widen the coverage of the solar spectrum and minimize energy loss associated with electron-hole recombination.“We can tailor the properties of these cables to address the specific problems associated with each application,” said Zhang. “Beyond renewable energy applications, they could have exciting uses ranging from quantum computing to nanoelectronics.”This research is described in detail in the April 5, 2007, online edition of Nano Letters.Citation: Yong Zhang, Lin-Wang Wang, and Angelo Mascarenhas, “’Quantum Coaxial Cables’ for Solar Energy Harvesting.” Nano Lett. ASAP Article, DOI: 10.1021/nl070066tCopyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Sony Ericsson Ainoa Smarter Phone Access All Media Content Any TimeAny Where
Sony Ericsson Ainoa Smarter Phone Access All Media Content Any TimeAny Where

first_img Explore further Nokia launches latest handset: Nokia 6125 What Ainoa Is About:Ainoa 3G is about connectivity and quick and easy access to content via your PC, Playstation 3, a built-in 8.1 MP digital camera, video, music files, movie clips, social networking and in some regions TV. Ainoa has a 3-inch 432 x 240 pixel screen with 16,777, 216 color TFT, 55 MB internal memory with an 8-GB SanDisk micro-SD card slot, with compatibility to the full range of Sony memory cards. The sleek .06-inch depth and stylish 4-inch futuristic design has a retractable keypad, control wheel, an intuitive touch UI in media mode with easily navigable launch buttons for switching to various modes. The Question Is—What Can’t Ainoa Do?Ainoa Media Go allows users to keep up to date with the latest music and videos. Media Go transfers, plays and organizes all your music, photos, videos, podcasts by WiFi directly from your PC. PlayStation 3 owners may control and access media content on the Ainoa handset’s 3-inch vibrant screen any where and any time using Remote Play. Users may opt for local network connections or utilize the Internet with the built-in WAP 2.0 XHTML or Web feed from anywhere world-wide. Sony Ericsson announced the integrating and scintillating new smarter phone, Ainoa also spelled Aino in London on May 28, 2009. By smarter, I mean the future of communications is exemplified by the 4.1-inch x 2.0-inch x .06-inch, 4.7-ounce Obsidian Black Ainoa phone. Ainoa 3G with UMTS HSPA 850/1900/2100, UMTS HSUPA 850/1900/2100, GSM/GPRS/EDGE 850/900/1800/1900 will hook you up on every device you own, dream of owning or is on the drawing board in a R&D lab. The future is now. Sony Ericsson Ainoa This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Sony Ericsson Ainoa Smarter Phone: Access All Media Content Any Time–Any Where (2009, May 31) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-05-sony-ericsson-ainoa-smarter-access.html I will highlight some interesting features of Ainoa, for a full list see the following link. Ainoa has an 8.1 MP digital camera with a digital zoom up to 16x, picture blogging, geo tagging, image stabilizer, video blogging, picture fix, face detection, photo flash/light, video recording, red-eye reduction and touch or auto focus. As an entertainment device, Ainoa has FM radio with RDS, tracker, video streaming, video viewing, JAVA, motion gaming, 3D gaming and more. Ainoa music capabilities include shake control, Track I.D., MP3, AAC, MegaBass, Bluetooth Stereo A2DP, Media Player and stereo speaker capabilities. Connectivity is Ainoa’s middle name. Ainoa features PictBridge, WiFi, USB support, USB mass storage, synchronization, a modem, Bluetooth technology, DLNA certified, Google Maps and a GPS. Ainoa has all the organizing features one would expect, a calendar, flight mode, timer, world clock, notes and a touch screen. Ainoa’s communications and messaging features include, sound recording, predictive text input, instant messaging, picture messaging, text messaging, exchange active sync and email. As a phone, Ainoa features video calling, vibrate alert, speakerphone and polyphonic ringtones. Ainoa is currently advertised by Sony Ericsson in their Americas web site. It will be available in Mexico, Columbia, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela and Western Europe and eventually world-wide. The current price for the USA is not available nor is the release date. Historically speaking, Ainoa Times refer to the era in Hawaiian history post-Western influence noted for being an era of mixed blessings, marked by the introduction of new diseases and exceptional adaptation to new circumstances.© 2009 PhysOrg.com Sony Ericsson Ainoalast_img read more

Progressive Automotive XPrize runnerup car gets 2075 MPGe
Progressive Automotive XPrize runnerup car gets 2075 MPGe

first_img © 2010 PhysOrg.com More information: www.progressiveautoxprize.org/ and www.illuminatimotorworks.org/ Explore further 3 ultra-efficient cars win $10M innovation award (w/ Video) After falling out of the running in last summer’s competition (whose purpose was to incite ingenuity in the design of highly efficient vehicles) due to a clutch problem, the Illuminati team has continued to work on their vehicle, and was recently invited by Progressive Automotive X-Prize committee members and the U.S. Department of Energy to test their car at Chrysler’s, Chelsea proving grounds in Michigan. It was there on that track last month that Seven demonstrated it’s impressive efficiency. In comparison, the Edison2 Very Light Car, winner of the competition last summer achieved just 102.5 MPGe; also, it might be noted that the Nissan Leaf, now commercially available, gets just 99 MPGe.The Illuminati team (whose name is a perhaps tongue-in-cheek reference to the conspiracy theorist group who claim everything in the world is run by a group of secret leaders) an all American volunteer group, set out to prove that the vehicles produced by the big name automakers were not nearly as efficient as they could be, for whatever reason; and they appear to have backed up their claim. The Seven isn’t just a demo vehicle; it’s street legal and also features such niceties as air conditioning and a stereo. It’s also rather odd looking, resembling a Porsche Panamera, complete with gull wings and teardrop shaped fenders. It can go from 0-60 mph (26.82 m/s) in eight seconds, has a range of 200 miles (322 kilometers) and can reach speeds up to 130 miles (209 kilometers) per hour.MPGe is the calculated average distance traveled per unit of energy, and is based on a formula that equates 33.7 kilowatt hours of electricity to one U.S. gallon of gasoline. In the United States, all-electric and hybrid vehicles for sale must have a sticker that shows MPGe, before they can be sold.It’s doubtful the Seven will ever show up for sale on car lots, but it does appear that team Illuminati has achieved its goal of shedding light on the fact that much higher efficiency in automotive vehicles can be achieved, if we the consumer are willing to open are minds to the possibility of buying cars where mileage is more important than style or good looks and then demand as much from those that sell them to us.center_img Citation: Progressive Automotive X-Prize runner-up car gets 207.5 MPGe (2011, May 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-05-automotive-x-prize-runner-up-car-mpge.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — After coming in second to team Edison2 in the Progressive Automotive X-Prize competition last summer, team Illuminati, makers of the car named “Seven” have demonstrated that their vehicle is capable of achieving 207.5 Miles per Gallon equivalent (MPGe), (88.2 Kilometers per Liter) a designation created by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to give consumers a means of comparing mileage efficiency of all-electric vehicles or hybrids to one another and those still running on gasoline power.last_img read more

Documentarians capture vampire bats on video feeding on juvenile penguins
Documentarians capture vampire bats on video feeding on juvenile penguins

first_imgImage: Wikipedia Explore further It wasn’t easy to capture the footage—the researchers had to hide themselves in the cave at night when it was almost completely dark. The cave is where the penguins live—it offers some degree of protection from their main predator, neighboring sea lions. To witness what was going on the filmmakers hid themselves some distance from the penguins and used infrared cameras, scanning the small crowd for evidence of bats among them. They knew something was afoot when the group began to grow agitated. As the vampire bats began flying over and around the group, the adults moved in ways that staved off being attacked, but the juveniles, still learning, were not able to do the same. The cameras captured the bats biting the feet of the young penguins, landing and licking their blood.Contrary to popular folklore, vampire bats don’t actually suck the blood from unsuspecting victims, though they do generally favor those that are sleeping—they swoop in, bite, and then retreat. Then, they land nearby, creep up on the still sleeping animal and lick the blood that seeps from the wound.Scientists have long suspected that the vampire bats that live in the Atacama Desert were deviating from the norm and were attacking young awake penguins—bite marks on their feet offered ample proof. No one had ever seen such an attack however—the BBC team, led by producer Matthew Gordon set out to do just that. In speaking with BBC Nature, Gordon reported that the bats went for the juveniles because they seemed less able to take preemptive measures.The attacks don’t kill the penguins, the documentarians noted, or even harm them that much. The bites leave them open to infection, of course, or contracting rabies and the loss of blood can leave them weak, but most recover and grow to adulthood, where over time they apparently learn to ward off the hungry bats. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Documentarians capture vampire bats on video feeding on juvenile penguins (2013, February 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-02-documentarians-capture-vampire-video-juvenile.htmlcenter_img Culling vampire bats is for suckers, says study © 2013 Phys.org (Phys.org)—BBC documentarians filming for a special called “Penguins: Spy in the huddle” have captured video of vampire bats feeding on juvenile Humboldt penguins in a cave in the Atacama Desert in southern Peru. Until now, such attacks had never been witnessed by human eyes, though scientists had good reason to believe they occurred—bite marks on the feet of juveniles are quite common.last_img read more

New optical technique able to detect a single radio signal amongst background
New optical technique able to detect a single radio signal amongst background

first_img(Phys.org)—A small team of researchers with the University of California has found a way to pick out a single short radio signal burst among a barrage of background noise. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes their technique, how it works, how accurate it is and the possible applications it might be used for. Michael Vasilyev, with the University of Texas offers a Perspectives piece on the work done by the team in the same journal issue, noting how some human organs have senses that rely on using a similar technique to make sense of the environment. Journal information: Science No extraterrestrial laser pulses detected from KIC 8462852, SETI reports Single-event noise discrimination. Credit: (c) Science 11 December 2015: Vol. 350 no. 6266 pp. 1343-1346, DOI: 10.1126/science.aac8446 More information: Subnoise detection of a fast random event, Science 11 December 2015: Vol. 350 no. 6266 pp. 1343-1346, DOI: 10.1126/science.aac8446ABSTRACTObservation of random, nonrepetitive phenomena is of critical importance in astronomy, spectroscopy, biology, and remote sensing. Heralded by weak signals, hidden in noise, they pose basic detection challenges. In contrast to repetitive waveforms, a single-instance signal cannot be separated from noise through averaging. Here, we show that a fast, randomly occurring event can be detected and extracted from a noisy background without conventional averaging. An isolated 80-picosecond pulse was received with confidence level exceeding 99%, even when accompanied by noise. Our detector relies on instantaneous spectral cloning and a single-step, coherent field processor. The ability to extract fast, subnoise events is expected to increase detection sensitivity in multiple disciplines. Additionally, the new spectral-cloning receiver can potentially intercept communication signals that are presently considered secure.Press release © 2015 Phys.orgcenter_img As Vasilyev notes, there are a lot of areas in science that could benefit from an ability to isolate a single short signal amongst a stream of noise—astronomy, is just one example. Currently it is impossible to separate out a unique signal if there is just one burst present—there needs to be multiple examples. That could change in the near future as the researchers on this new effort have developed a way to convert radio signals to optical signals that can be processed to filter, separate and identify individual components.The team started with converting the radio signals to optical signals because the latter are more sensitive to changes in frequency—to make the conversation, the team looped the signals so that they could gather enough data for averaging. Next they used two tunable optical frequency combs—when the spectrums were overlapped it allowed for alignment of the components which caused the signal to be amplified as compared to other background noise, which then allowed it to be uniquely identified. The team tested their technique by running 4,720 detection attempts and found it to be better than 99 percent accurate.The researchers believe their technique can be broadened to include the detection of a wide variety of signals, from optic applications to those that look for microwaves. It could also possibly be modified for use in seemingly unrelated research areas such as sensing the spontaneous decay of a molecule. There also exists the possibility that the new detector could be used to spot signals that to date have gone undetected, perhaps revealing the existence of some new type of phenomena. Explore further Citation: New optical technique able to detect a single radio signal amongst background noise (2015, December 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-12-optical-technique-radio-background-noise.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Rapid turnon of a nuclear transient observed by astronomers
Rapid turnon of a nuclear transient observed by astronomers

first_imgAn international team of astronomers has observed the peculiar activity of a nuclear transient event known as PS1-13cbe. The transient, which occurred in the nucleus of the galaxy SDSS J222153.87+003054.2, experienced a rapid flare-up lasting about 70 days. The finding is reported in a paper published November 8 on arXiv.org. Researchers discover a blazar-like narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further More information: Reza Katebi et al. PS1-13cbe: The Rapid “Turn on” of a Seyfert 1. arXiv:1811.03694 [astro-ph.GA]. arxiv.org/abs/1811.03694 © 2018 Science X Network The observed transient luminosities of PS1-13cbe from the PS1 survey in gr izyP1 filters after correction for Galactic extinction. S: marks the epoch of the LDSS spectrum (MJD 56570). Credit: Katebi et al., 2018. Citation: Rapid ‘turn-on’ of a nuclear transient observed by astronomers (2018, November 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-rapid-turn-on-nuclear-transient-astronomers.html At a redshift of 0.12355, SDSS J222153.87+003054.2 (or SDSS J2221+0030 for short) is a type 2 Seyfert galaxy. It has a central supermassive black hole (SMBH) with an estimated mass of around 20 million solar masses.In general, Seyfert galaxies host active galactic nuclei (AGN) that produce spectra line emissions from highly ionized gas. Astronomers classify these galaxies as type 1 or 2, depending on the emission lines shown by their spectra.However, observations show that various AGN types are observed in the same object at different epochs of time. One explanation of this phenomenon is that some type 2 Seyfert galaxies are actually type 1 with inactive engines. This suggests that type 2 Seyfert galaxies are an evolved version of the type 1.Some AGNs showcase X-ray absorption variations, and are thus called “changing-look” AGNs. Furthermore, in some Seyfert galaxies, the broad emission lines disappear and, while in others broad emission lines appear, what astronomers describe as a “turn-on” of an AGN. So far, the most rapid “turn-ons” observed last less than one year.Now, a team of researchers led by Reza Katebi of Ohio University reports a rapid “turn-on” of the nuclear transient PS1-13cbe in the nucleus of the galaxy SDSS J2221+0030. PS1-13cbe was detected on July 9, 2013 in the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) sky survey. Additional observations of this transient and its host galaxy, that led to the new findings, were conducted by the team using NASA’s Swift spacecraft, the 6.5 m Magellan Clay telescope and the 2.4 m Hiltner telescope.According to the paper, PS1-13cbe brightened in the course of about 70 days and reached a peak total optical luminosity of approximately 10.6 tredecillion erg/s, while its temperature roughly stayed constant. Moreover, this rapid “turn-on” of PS1-13cbe was accompanied by the appearance of broad Balmer lines and hence a transition to a type 1 Seyfert galaxy.”At the time of the outburst, the galaxy changed type to a Seyfert 1 as broad Hα and Hβ appeared and the continuum brightened in the spectrum taken with LDSS3 +57 days after the peak and then changed its type back to a Seyfert 2 as the broad Hα and Hβ disappeared in the spectrum taken with OSMOS 2 years later and did not reappear in spectra taken three and four years after the outburst,” the researchers wrote in the paper.The observations allowed Katebi’s team to conclude that PS1-13cbe is a “changing-look” AGN that has been powered by instabilities in the accretion disk. They added that the “turn-on” of this AGN is among the shortest observed in a “changing look” active galactic nuclei.last_img read more

Flowery treats in the new year
Flowery treats in the new year

first_imgThe capital is ready to host the fifth International Horti Expo 2013 and the eighth International Flora Expo come new year. The exhibition will have theme pavilions on fresh fruits and vegetables, farm machineries, potato products and technologies, cold chain, logistics, organic, medicinal herbal products and floriculture.This expo has the Union Ministry of Agriculture as its principal sponsor along with a host of other departments including the National Medicinal Plant Board and Indian Flowers and Ornamental Plants Welfare Association. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting”Flowers are unique and are for every occasion, even death. A person can refuse chocolate or pastry, but not flowers,’ said S Jafar Naqvi, President, Indian Flowers and Ornamental Plants Welfare Association (iFlora). ‘Due to rising income, craving of the new generation, globalisation and internet, people in India are willing to spend profusely on floral decoration. So, this news would be a relief for anyone wanting a chunk of the bourgeoning Indian floral decoration markets through flowers and floral accessories,’ he said. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixLatest varieties of flowers like anthurium, gerbera and roses from Holland, Thailand, Germany, France and New Zealand will be exhibited in this Flora Expo, where Thailand is considered to be the main country in focus for blooms. There will also be a presentation with the theme of ‘Building Bridges through flowers between nations’. ‘IFlora and Flora Expo aim to increase per capita flower consumption even further to give more impetus to floriculture industry. We can’t have better time, and sky is the limit,’ said Jafar. India has a unique culture of flower consumption in many forms like garlands, flower-carpets, floral rains and floral jewelry etc in all celebrations. The Flora Expo will bring not only conventional flower and gardening industry professionals but also huge amount of buyers from new types of large industry retailers such as home centers, supermarkets, departmental stores and interior shops. And this exhibition is perhaps the only opportunity in India for international suppliers to meet and trade with all of them on one single platform.So flower lovers and  nature enthusiasts can mark their calendars out and enjoy a nice winter evening checking out the blooms  on display.DETAILAt: NSIC Exhibition Complex, Okhla When: 11 to 13 Januarylast_img read more

Twists are in the depth of the characters
Twists are in the depth of the characters

first_imgWhat inspired you to write Simian?When I was young, my grandmother used to tell me tales from the Ramayana and the Mahabharata as bedtime stories. My favourites involved Hanuman and Bali. Then as I grew older and I thought about them in detail, I found myself questioning certain aspects of the stories I couldn’t come to terms with. My grandmother couldn’t answer them, it was upto me. And I soon found, among others of my generation, that I wasn’t alone in this questioning. That was the seed of the idea for Simian. To deal with these questions in me.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Why do you think a legend like that of Hanuman’s needed a re-telling?These legends have been told and retold countless times in hundreds of languages over the past three thousand years. I don’t know why they have survived and others haven’t. All I know is that there must be a reason why they are so much a part of our culture and us. I think retelling these stories is part of their nature. They are open to it since they are not written in stone and that is what is so unique and beautiful about them.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixHow did the story of Simian formulate in your mind? How difficult (or easy) was it to get it down on paper?The story formulated as a result of the delving questions I have had ever since my grandmother used to tell me the Ramayana as a young boy. It had a long gestation period. I had to mature into the person I am now for it to be ready. That part was beyond my control. Regarding difficulty; on the one hand the work was incredibly hard but on the other hand it made sense to me, so that made it easier.  Does your graphic novel add any twists to the story that everyone knows?Yes, it does. The twists are in the depth of the characters and the unique and interesting exploration of what is so familiar to us in the story of the Ramayana. I dig deep and explore the characters relationships and motivations. Why did Sugriva kill his brother Bali? Why does Ram decide to stay in the forest even when Bharat comes to take him back? Why did Ravan really kidnap Sita? It is meant for both those readers familiar with the Ramayana, and those who don’t know anything about the story. Why did you pick Ramayana and Hanuman’s story?I picked the Ramayana because it means so much to me. I’ve known the story since before I can remember and that fascination with it has never left me. When my grandmother used to tell me the Ramayana and the Mahabharata, from that very young age I always identified more with the Vanars. And I chose Hanuman’s story because I found his story the most compelling. I also felt it hadn’t been explored yet, the way it should be.Do you have plans to take on any other character from any other epic in the future?Not yet. I’m working on part three of Simian right now. There’s time after that.If you weren’t an author what would you have been?Actually I’m a film-maker by training and profession, and being an author feels no different. I’m doing what I’ve always been doing, and that is telling stories.last_img read more

Celebrations in order
Celebrations in order

first_imgIf you thought you might miss out on Teej celebrations amidst the hustle and bustle of the Capital, think again! Delhi Tourism is organizing its annual Teej Festival at its three Dilli Haats on the below mentioned dates: Dilli Haat (INA) – 25 to 30 July, Dilli Haat (Pitampura) -25 to 27 July and Dilli Haat (Janakpuri) – 27 to 31 July. The festival marks the advent of the Shravan (monsoon season). The festival is dedicated to Goddess Parvati commemorating the day when she was united with Lord Shiva. Women celebrate this festival by applying mehndi on their hands and decking up in finery. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The major highlights of the events planned at the Dilli Haats are a Teej Bazaar offering Mehndi, Choori, Lehria and other items, Rajasthani delicacies and other traditional food items will be available at the food stalls set up specially for the festival, performances by folk artists, specially from the Nagaras from Banchar Village with a highlight of the Kachhi Ghodi dance. There will also be a mehndi competition at Dilli Haat – INA (26 July at 5.00 pm) and Janakpuri (30 July at 5.00 pm) along with Rangoli and Bindi Competition at Dilli Haat Janakpuri on 27 July at 5.00 pm and 29 July at 5.00 pm.There will also be camel rides at the venues along with a special children’s corner and traditional swings for the ladies to enjoy. The Janakpuri venue will also be hosting a rakhi bazaar during the festival. Head over!last_img read more

Warriors stage fantastic fightback beat Delhi 31
Warriors stage fantastic fightback beat Delhi 31

first_imgPunjab Warriors continued their impressive run and came from a goal down to beat defending champions Delhi Waveriders 3-1 and register their third consecutive win in the Hockey India League on Friday. Down by a goal till the first three quarters, it took a spirited fightback from the Warriors to maintain their winning streak, pumping in three goals in the fourth and final quarter through Ciriello (50th minute), SV Sunil (54th) and Affan Yousuf (56th). Also Read – Khel Ratna for Deepa and Bajrang, Arjuna for JadejaIt was the Waveriders who struck early through Child’s superb strike. Child deflected in a fantastic diving goal after being set up by Akashdeep Singh’s pass from the left flank. Stung by the early goal, Punjab went on the attack but failed to score as the first quarter ended with Delhi enjoying slender lead. Warriors continued to mount attack in the second quarter and managed to equalise through Malak Singh. But the Waveriders went for the referral for an infringement and the goal was overturned. After change of ends,  Waveriders’ tactics backfired as Warriors mounted pressure on the home team’s defence  and scored at crucial junctures to walk away with the match.last_img read more

PMEGP provides marketing support
PMEGP provides marketing support

first_imgExclusive products of Silk, Muslin, fabric and readymade as well as sarees of Kantha, Baluchari, Garad, Matka, Balkal are available for sale. In addition to this,  products of Jute, Dokra, Terracotta, Leather, Artificial jewelry and other handicrafts of Bengal manufactured by PMEGP entrepreneurs are also displayed and available for sale.The  PMEGP exhibition of West Bengal, Khadi Bongo Utsav was inaugurated by Anup K Pujari, Secretary, MSME, government of India at Khadi Gramodyog Bhavan on August 17.  On this occasion, he also launched Khadi Trouser line and took a round of the exhibition.  He appreciated the products manufactured by PMEGP entrepreneurs and Khadi Institutions.  BH Anil Kumar, Joint Secretary (ARI), MSME and Arun Kumar Jha, CEO and Commissioner, KVIC, were also present on this Occasion.last_img read more

Change your practice sessions to learn new skill
Change your practice sessions to learn new skill

first_imgFor practicing and developing a new skill, making slight changes during practice sessions may help to master the skill faster than practicing in the same manner, a new study has found.The results support the idea of a process called reconsolidation, in which existing memories are recalled and modified with new knowledge, plays a key role in strengthening of motor skills, said senior author Pablo A Celnik from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in the US. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’“What we found is if you practice a slightly modified version of a task you want to master, you actually learn more and faster than if you just keep practicing the exact same thing multiple times in a row,” Celnik added. The study was published in the journal Current Biology, suggests reconsolidation is not only for leisure skills like learning a musical instrument or a sport, but it is also beneficial for helping patients with stroke and other neurological conditions regain lost motor function, Celnik explained. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixFor the study, 86 healthy volunteers were asked to learn a computer-based motor skill using an isometric pinch task over the course of two or three 45-minute sessions. The volunteers were divided in three groups. The first group completed a typical training schedule and repeated the exact same training lesson six hours later. The second group performed the first practice session and, after six hours, completed a second training session in which researchers had twisted the test and the third group performed the exact same task just once a day. Speedier and more accurate completion of the task, nearly doubled among those in the second group compared to those in the first group, who repeated the same task, the study found. Participants in the third group, who skipped the second session, performed approximately 25 per cent worse than those in the first group.“If you make the altered task too different, people do not get the gain we observed during reconsolidation. The modification between sessions needs to be subtle,” he says.last_img read more

Just walking around can help you live longer
Just walking around can help you live longer

first_imgEven if you do not sweat it out in the gym very morning, swapping out just a few minutes of sedentary time with some sort of movement can help you live longer, suggests new research.In the study involving over 3,000 people aged 50 to 79, the researchers found that the least active people were five times more likely to die during the study period than the most active people and three times more likely than those in the middle range for activity.“You did not have to even get a good sweat to experience the reduced likelihood of mortality,” said study lead author Ezra Fishman from University of Pennsylvania in the US. “Activity doesn’t have to be especially vigorous to be beneficial. That’s the public health message,” Fishman noted. For the study, the participants wore ultra-sensitive activity trackers, called accelerometers, for seven days, generating data compiled by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). For these same people, the agency then tracked mortality for the next eight years.“When we compare people who exercise the same amount, those who sit less and move around more tend to live longer,” Fishman said. “The folks who were walking around, washing the dishes, sweeping the floor tended to live longer than the people who were sitting at a desk,” Fishman noted. Though the scientists did not discover any magic threshold for the amount a person needs to move to improve mortality, they did learn that even adding just 10 minutes per day of light activity could make a difference.last_img read more

Promoting Indian culture through books
Promoting Indian culture through books

first_img“Without knowledge, one cannot attain salvation,” said Dr Mahesh Sharma, Minister of State for Culture and Tourism (Independent Charge) while inaugurating the Noida-Greater Noida Book Fair recently. The book fair is being organised by National Book Trust, India at India Expo Centre, Greater Noida from September 12 – 18.Dr. Mahesh Sharma added that books open up the door for development. Therefore, it is important to spread the culture of reading good books across the society. He also appreciated National Book Trust, India’s role in promoting Indian culture through books. Reflecting upon the importance of books, Dr Mahesh Sharma said that books change the course of life and guide people in distress to take the right course. He urged people to be a part of this book fair to gain knowledge through books. NP Singh, District Magistrate, Gautam Buddha Nagar was the chief guest on the occasion. He observed that our ancient texts are the basis of our culture and knowledge. They have played a significant role in passing wisdom from generation to generation. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfEarlier, Baldeo Bhai Sharma, Chairman, NBT welcomed the guests. He opined that the habit of reading has not diminished as a large number of people enthusiastically participate in the book fairs and mobile exhibitions that are organised in different corners of the country. He also informed that NBT has come up with two new series namely ‘Veergatha’ series on Paramveer Chakra awardees and ‘Women Pioneer’ series on great women activists. More than 100 publishers, distributors and booksellers are participating in the book fair and are displaying books on all subjects and genres. A discount of 10% on the sale of all books, and special discount will be given on library purchases.last_img read more

Fastingmimicking diet may reverse diabetes
Fastingmimicking diet may reverse diabetes

first_imgA diet designed to imitate the effects of fasting may reverse diabetes by reprogramming cells, claims a new study published in the journal cell that may help treat the condition without drugs or painful insulin injections. The fasting-like diet promotes the growth of new insulin-producing pancreatic cells that reduce symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in mice, according to the study on mice and human cells led by researchers at University of Southern California (USC) in the US. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”Cycles of a fasting-mimicking diet and a normal diet essentially reprogrammed non-insulin-producing cells into insulin-producing cells,” said Valter Longo, director of the Longevity Institute at the USC.”By activating the regeneration of pancreatic cells, we were able to rescue mice from late-stage type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We also reactivated insulin production in human pancreatic cells from type 1 diabetes patients,” said Longo.The reprogrammed adult cells and organs prompted a regeneration in which damaged cells were replaced with new functional ones, he said. The research is the latest in a series of studies to demonstrate promising health benefits of a brief, periodic diet that mimics the effects of a water-only fast. In type 1 and late-stage type 2 diabetes, the pancreas loses insulin-producing beta cells, increasing instability in blood sugar levels. The study showed a remarkable reversal of diabetes in mice placed on the fasting-mimicking diet for four days each week. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThey regained healthy insulin production, reduced insulin resistance and demonstrated more stable levels of blood glucose. This was the case even for mice in the later stages of the disease. The diet cycles switched on genes in the adult mice that are normally active only in the developing pancreases of foetal mice. The genes set off production of a protein, neurogenin-3 (Ngn3); thus, generating new, healthy insulin-producing beta cells. Longo and his team also examined pancreatic cell cultures from human donors and found that, in cells from type 1 diabetes patients, fasting also increased expression of the Ngn3 protein and accelerated insulin production. The results suggest that a fasting-mimicking diet could alleviate diabetes in humans. Another study by the same team published last week demonstrated that the fasting-mimicking diet reduced risks for cancer, diabetes, heart disease and other age-related diseases in human study participants who followed the special diet for five days each month in a three-month span. Prior studies on the diet have shown potential for alleviating symptoms of the neurodegenerative disease multiple sclerosis, increasing the efficacy of chemotherapy for cancer treatments, and decreasing visceral fat.last_img read more

Bodies of mother daughter found hanging
Bodies of mother daughter found hanging

first_imgKolkata: Mystery shrouds the death of a woman and her daughter whose bodies were found hanging from the ceiling inside their house.The incident occurred in the Jhargram’s Sankrail area on Monday night. The incident triggered tension among locals. The victims have been identified as Pramila Mahato and Chanchala Mahato. Locals found the victims hanging from the ceiling of two separate rooms. They reported the matter to the local police station. After being informed police reached the spot and recovered the bodies. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeNo suicide note has been recovered from their rooms. According to the preliminary investigation, police suspect the victims might have committed suicide. They are also investigating to know if the mother instigated her daughter to commit suicide and then killed herself. Police have sent the bodies for autopsy. They are waiting for the reports. Locals told police the mother used to reside there with her daughter. The victims might have committed suicide over a family quarrel. Police are interrogating the locals and some of the family members of the victims. A detailed probe has been initiated.last_img read more

Kangana to don Khadi on silver screen in Manikarnika
Kangana to don Khadi on silver screen in Manikarnika

first_imgAfter dressing up officials in several government offices, Khadi is now making its way to silver screen. Kangana Ranaut, who is playing the lead role in Manikarnika: The Queen of Jhansi, would showcase the Queen’s love for country’s heritage fabric Khadi in this upcoming Indian epic biographical film. And for the promotion of this signature fabric, the attire of the lead casts of this movie is being sponsored by Khadi and Village Industries Commission (KVIC). Also Read – Add new books to your shelfExpressing pride and pleasure for being a part in the renewal of India’s spirit of Independence, KVIC Chairman Vinai Kumar Saxena said that Rani Laxmibai is one of the fascinating women in terms of what she had done in her life. “Khadi is connected to India’s voice of Independence since time immemorial. But very few people know that some seven decades before Gandhiji’s tryst with Charkha, a girl born in Varanasi as Manikarnika, not only mastered reading the Vedas and Puranas, but also learned weaving before being the Queen of Jhansi,” he said. Speaking further he mentioned, “It is a morale booster in terms of aggressive marketing and promotion strategy for KVIC that she (Kangana Ranaut as Rani Laxmibai) would be spinning the wheel in this movie. It would once again prove that prior to British rule in India, Khadi was flourishing in our country and later it was Charkha that drove the Britishers away from India.” Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveIt may be noted here that sponsored by Khadi and Village Industries Commission (KVIC), the costume line for the film shall be designed by ace designer Neeta Lulla. Lulla has already picked up fabric costing around Rs 26 lakh from KVIC. According to Chairman VK Saxena, the fabric being used for the film includes a mixed bag of silk, cotton, muslin and some wool too. Impressed by the fabric, Lulla is already making plans to use the desi fabric in her personal line too. “I feel Khadi exemplifies a lot of character. I am already in conversation with KVIC to launch a capsule collection worldwide which will be retailed across various outlets to ensure the eco-friendly fabric resonates with the millennial generation,” she said.On the other hand, Kamal Jain, the producer of the movie, said that the entire unit was proud to associate with KVIC and applauded their contribution in providing the best range of Khadi that had added immensely to the range of costumes in the film. “The shooting of the film is underway and these unique costumes play a vital role in revitalizing the glorious history of India,” he said.last_img read more

Decorate your house with travel souvenirs
Decorate your house with travel souvenirs

first_imgWhile setting off on a journey, be it national or international, most of us like to bring back home something as a memory. Whether it’s a fridge magnet, a miniature, postcards or even some attractive stones found on a beach, make sure you are giving this memories a nice place at your home.Experts give tips on how meaningful souvenirs that you collect from your journeys can turn into attractive home décor pieces if used smartly:If you’re a shell collector or have a collection of colourful and attractive stones, then flaunt them in empty glass bowls/mason jars or flower vases. You can also place tea-light candles, sand, small rocks, pine cones in jars and decorate them with battery-powered string lights for a cool display in the bedroom, as a centerpiece. Write the place and date you visited on the stone/shell and plunk them in the bowl/jar and watch your collection grow along with your trips. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfHow about turning a few of your favourite holiday pictures into a collage print or reproducing them onto a clock? One of the best ways to display your travel memories is by creating a photo wall at home. Display your fond memories with a varied collection of photos or prints and transform the look of your space. Consider a variety of frames or choose pictures in different shapes and sizes.If you enjoy collecting postcards, tickets, brochures, currency and maps of different destinations, but do not know how to make use of them creatively, fret not! Buy a pin board, fix it on one of those empty walls in your room and start decorating it with your collectables. Get creative and place this pin board in your bedroom or living room to show-off your collectables. A great way to display them is to use a thick string and some clothespins or binder clips so that you can keep swapping them for a versatile display. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveInstead of stacking those attractive ceramic and bone china plates of different colours and sizes in your shelf, how about using them to create unusual wall art? Especially if you want to accentuate your dining area, these beautifully hand-painted or printed plates that you collected from different countries/cities can instantly give a facelift to your space. Those floral patterns or other funky designs are sure to spark conversations when you have guests at home for dinner.If you have a study table/coffee table with a glass tabletop and a hollowed centre, then make use of the space to proudly showcase your travel knick-knacks. Organise and arrange your collectables such as shells, photos and postcards to depict a narrative. A clever idea to turn your globe-trotting collectables into a stylish and attractive display!last_img read more

Offering gift options for Diwali
Offering gift options for Diwali

first_imgHappiness and love are the two things we seek for Diwali, one of the most celebrated festivals across India. This time of the year invokes the feeling of togetherness, joy, divinity and brings with it a beautiful package of moments to be cherished hereafter.While you take care of the festive season’s to-do list, JW Marriott New Delhi Aerocity rounds up some of the most delectable gift items and packages them with love and the promise of a wonderful year ahead. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfStylishly designed and elegantly put together, Diwali gift hampers from JW Marriott New Delhi Aerocity include toothsome goodies, enriching delights, aromatic champagne, macaroons and a token of love as cookies and dry fruits to awe your friends, family, colleagues, and delight the recipients at your thoughtful generosity. With twelve carefully curated boxes, each of them specially designed to suit the gifting need of every luxury connoisseur, the customization starts from 1000/- onwards and the standard gift boxes start from INR 1500 with exotic Indian sweets, chocolate truffles, and fruit cake, while the luxury options go up to over 2 lakhs and include some of the choicest luxury gifts. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveJW Marriott New Delhi Aerocity lends its signature style combining elegance with luxury, to make your Diwali a joyous, prosperous occasion and a beautiful memory that will linger for many years to come… The gifting options include JW classic – exotic Indian sweets, chocolate truffles, dry fruits cake and spiced cashew nuts savoury, everything just in Rs 1500; JW Premium which has exotic Indian sweets and chocolate truffles in Rs 2500; JW Premier having exotic Indian sweets, chocolate truffles, dry fruits cake, spiced cashew nuts savoury, assorted cookies and Ganesha idol, all in just INR 3000. More than you can think of, Marriott is offering options like JW Treat; JW Deluxe; JW Mini Treasure; JW gifts; JW bundle of joy; wooden box; luxury box and treasure box, which ranges up to Rs 25000.last_img read more

Alcohol intake in India up 38 this decade
Alcohol intake in India up 38 this decade

first_imgIndia’s annual alcohol intake increased by 38 per cent between 2010 and 2017, according to a study published Wednesday which found the total volume of alcohol consumed globally per year has risen by 70 per cent since 1990. Published in The Lancet journal, the study of 189 countries’ alcohol intake between 1990-2017 and estimated intake up to 2030 suggests that the world is not on track to achieve targets against harmful alcohol use. Between 2010 and 2017, alcohol consumption in India increased by 38 per cent – from 4.3 to 5.9 litres per adult per year, said researchers from TU Dresden in Germany. Over the same timescale, consumption increased slightly in the US (9.3-9.8 litres) and in China (7.1-7.4 litres), they said. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfAs a result of increased alcohol consumption and population growth, the total volume of alcohol consumed globally per year has increased by 70 per cent — from 20,999 million litres in 1990 to 35,676 million litres in 2017. Intake is growing in low- and middle-income countries, while the total volume of alcohol consumed in high-income countries has remained stable. The estimates suggest that by 2030 half of all adults will drink alcohol, and almost a quarter (23 per cent) will binge drink at least once a month, researchers said. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveAlcohol is a major risk factor for disease, and is causally linked to over 200 diseases, in particular non-communicable diseases and injuries, they said. “Before 1990, most alcohol was consumed in high-income countries, with the highest use levels recorded in Europe,” said study author Jakob Manthey, from TU Dresden. “However, this pattern has changed substantially, with large reductions across Eastern Europe and vast increases in several middle-income countries such as China, India, and Vietnam. “This trend is forecast to continue up to 2030 when Europe is no longer predicted to have the highest level of alcohol use,” said Manthey. He said the World Health Organization (WHO)’s aim of reducing the harmful use of alcohol by 10 per cent by 2025 will not be reached globally. Instead, alcohol use will remain one of the leading risk factors for the burden of disease for the foreseeable future, and its impact will probably increase relative to other risk factors. Over the same period, it also measured prevalence of people who did not drink for their whole lives or were current drinkers (ie, drank alcohol at least once a year) using surveys for 149 countries, and binge drinkers using surveys from 118 countries. In 2017, the lowest alcohol intakes were in North African and Middle Eastern countries (typically less than one litre per adult per year), while the highest intakes were in Central and Eastern European countries (in some cases more than 12 litres per adult per year). Globally, alcohol consumption is set to increase from 5.9 litres pure alcohol a year per adult in 1990 to 7.6 litres in 2030. However, intake varied regionally. Between 2010-2017, consumption increased by 34 per cent in southeast Asia, with increases in India, Vietnam and Myanmar.last_img read more