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STABLE NOTES BY ED GOLDEN -SUNDAY, JUNE 23, 2019

first_imgFlavien Prat135 $328,997 38% 48% $267,807 $236,867 $605,602 8 5 5 (Current from April 12 through Saturday, June 22) $270,315 46% 9 17% 44% 14% Brian J. Koriner34 ITM% 8 $1,108,316 16% ITM% $669,456 $1,116,412 46% Martin Garcia70 35% $1,309,672 21 7 Mario Gutierrez81 6 14 1 21 58% 17 15% $433,626 27% 5 $214,586 19 $363,694 $557,048 10 45% OH, ZUZANNA! QUITE A RIDE TO CLAIMER OF MEET 5 $1,322,467 13 44% $337,546 14% $788,082 16 10 6 51% 9 1st 38% Agapito Delgadillo46 49% Drayden Van Dyke112 21% 57% 10 6 3rd $733,924 19% 3 $648,322 6 6 14 29% 10 6 14 2 14 $1,018,975 3 7 5 5 11 16% 7 BAFFERT BREEZES McKINZIE FOR WHITNEY STAKES 12 24 20 6 Norberto Arroyo, Jr.70 11 19% Heriberto Figueroa48 11 47% 15 54% 16% 14 Kent Desormeaux72 10% 37% George Papaprodromou26 22 SANTA ANITA STATISTICS $821,278 16% 5 Edwin Maldonado79 4 3 12 6 7 17% 22% 46% Mike Smith26 $1,262,016 5 2 19% $902,506 29 $480,419 $303,859 12 TrainerMts 10% Robert Hess, Jr.30 18 10 4 $2,202,197 30 9% 40% Geovanni Franco94 27 $159,266 2 Steven Miyadi32 $439,837center_img 15 56% $668,870 6 21% 15% 5 44% 21 Tim Yakteen17 19 John Sadler67 8 23% 38% 2nd 23 7 14 22% 44% 12 13 23 21% 9 5 17 19% 1 43% 8 15% 1 24% $173,004 John Shirreffs27 Bob Baffert41 7 16 50% 14 68% 10 7 Martin Pedroza42 Money Won Joseph Talamo125 15% 40% 30 Vladimir Cerin49 49% 3 Rafael Bejarano140 Win% 7 Steve Knapp34 48% 50% 14 $1,428,983 52% 6 Andrew Lerner16 18 18% William Spawr24 6 Mark Glatt81 45% 5 Victor Espinoza60 15 3 J. Keith Desormeaux34 $208,754 47% 57% Carla Gaines25 $775,570 Richard Mandella30 $667,323 6 $773,529 16% THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME FOR TRAINER CECIL 43% $255,598 6 25% 6 JockeyMts 3 43% 0 Tiago Pereira136 51% Doug O’Neill115 59% Money Won 15% 20% 10 Ruben Fuentes108 Richard Baltas81 3 Win% Leonard Powell26 14 11 15 2 Philip D’Amato86 Jerry Hollendorfer53 1st 5 6 17% 9 18% 64% 5 22% 19% 3 54% 6 FAIRYTALE COMES TRUE FOR TEAM ZUZANNAIt’s been a storybook ride the last three months for the five-year-old mare Zuzanna.Claimed for $8,000 on Sept. 13, 2018 by a partnership group that includes TVG host and analyst Kurt Hoover, the bay daughter of Wilburn won three of four subsequent races, the most recent yesterday’s second at Santa Anita, a $46,000 starter allowance at a mile on turf.Coming from seventh and last, Zuzanna won by a length and a half under Kent Desormeaux, who has ridden her to two of her last three victories, with one second. The win earned her honors as Claimer of the Meet in Santa Anita’s annual media poll.“She’s a doll to ride,” Desormeaux said Sunday morning at Clockers’ Corner, giving considerable credit to her trainer, Bob Hess Jr., with whom the 49-year-old Hall of Fame rider has enjoyed remarkable success through the years dating back to the early 1990s, winning nearly 38 percent of the time on mounts conditioned by Hess.“The race she lost (second by 1 ¼ lengths going a mile and an eighth on May 24) was probably her best effort with me, because there was always a target,” Desormeaux continued. “But even when she lost, she ran wild, she ran awesome; the winner just outran her that day.“She showed her tenacity yesterday because she had to make a long run. When we left the gate, we went about 50 yards and I could hear the water squeezing out of the course from the two days of rain we had. It wasn’t really rain, but it was misty those mornings.“So I was content to sit back there, and sure enough the field came back to me. She caught them, too, but in all the turf races the last two days, the winner came from last except in yesterday’s final race. So Zuzanna proved to be in the right spot, and she did the rest.“Bob’s done a fabulous job with her.”Addressing his success with Hess, Desormeaux was succinct. “I’m grateful to him for having the respect to put me on horses he likes,” Kent said. “My brother (trainer Keith Desormeaux) tries to do the same thing, but quite honestly, he tells me to my face, ‘Anybody can ride and win on Exaggerator. I need you to help me out on the ones that are not that good.’“It’s funny the way he put it, but it makes me understand that sometimes it’s important to get fifth on a horse.”Before Saturday’s races, Desormeaux was one of several Hall of Fame jockeys past and present who participated in a trackside benefit for the Permanently Disabled Jockeys Fund, which was later followed by a luxurious luncheon.“The banquet was more impressive to me,” he said, “because we were all rubbing shoulders. Even my jaw dropped seeing some of the people I idolized as a young rider–Bobby Ussery, Braulio Baeza, Steve Cauthen.“I didn’t know them all very well; I just knew their stories, but to have Steve Cauthen there made me feel really, really good just to be a part of it.”BRIT SHOWS HIS WIT AFTER ROYAL ASCOT VISITTrainer Ben Cecil is back stateside after a recent visit to his native England.  “It was a pleasure trip,” Cecil said. “I went to see my family and all my friends, and also took the occasion to attend the races at Royal Ascot on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.“Being there is like nothing else. If we could bring a bit of that here, it would be great.”Cecil made hay at Santa Anita while the sun was shining across the pond.“I had two winners here while I was gone,” he said, “one last Friday and one the following Friday.”Mentioned maybe he should stay away, Cecil laughed and said, “I’m thinking about it.”FINISH LINES: Multiple grade I winner McKinzie worked four furlongs Sunday in 51 seconds for Bob Baffert who has him ticketed for the $1 million Whitney Stakes at Saratoga on Aug. 3. On the three-year-old front, Baffert has Affirmed Stakes winner Mucho Gusto headed for the July 20 Haskell at Monmouth and Game Winner to the Aug. 24 Travers at Saratoga. Meanwhile, Omaha Beach, the pre-race favorite for the Kentucky Derby, continues to near his first breeze since being declared from that May 4 race by jogging and galloping at Santa Anita for Richard Mandella . . .The racing community offers condolences to family and friends of owner/breeder John Toffan, who died after a lengthy illness last Monday at his home in Hidden Hills, CA., according toDaily Racing Form. He was 83. Partnered with the late Trudy McCaffery, they won the Santa Anita Derby with Free House in 1997 and Came Home in 2002. Other stakes winners they campaigned included  Bien Bien, Bienamado, A.P. Assay, Bosque Redondo, Del Mar Dennis, Elaborate, Mane Minister and Pacific Squall. McCaffery died in 2007. Their trainer was Paco Gonzalez, since retired . . . Condolences also to family and friends of longtime owner/breeder Jim Ford, who passed away at 75 June 14 in Rancho Santa Fe, near Del Mar. His What a Spell, trained by Craig Lewis, became his first stakes winner when he took the 1991 Baldwin Stakes here and the highlight of his racing career came when Ticker Tape, an English-bred filly trained by Jim Cassidy, won the Grade I American Oaks in 2002 at Hollywood Park . . . Norberto Arroyo Jr. has been suspended three days (June 29, 30 and July 4) for causing interference on Street Imagein Friday’s first race . . . Santa Anita offers simulcast wagering this Thursday and Friday with free General Admission and free parking. Admission gates open at 10 a.m.LATEST CONTENT FROM XBTV: McKinzie works 4 furlongs. 6-23-19 (Baffert)Chasing Moments works 3 furlongs. 6-23-19 (Sherlock)Via Egnatia (Outside) and Morse Code works 5 furlongs. 6-23-19 (Baltas)XBTV Sunday: What to Watch for at Santa Anita Park on June 23rd, 2019.Shedrow Stroll: Phil D’Amato’s accomplished Turfer Tiny Tina.Shedrow Stroll: Phil D’Amato’s graded stakes winner Air Strike.Shedrow Stroll: Phil D’Amato’s graded stakes winner Bowies Hero.Shedrow Stroll: Phil D’Amato’s turf sprinter Master Ryan.Quick Questions: With Trainer Dan Blacker.Tequila Sunrise works 4 furlongs. 6-21-19 (Baltas)Rafal works 4 furlongs. 6-21-19 (Baffert)Grade 1 placed Ahimsa works 5 furlongs. 6-21-19 (Eurton)Multiple stakes winner American Anthem works 6 furlongs. 6-21-19 (Baffert)Bellafina works 4 furlongs. 6-22-19 (Callaghan)Flor De La Mar works 4 furlongs. 6-22-19 (Baffert)Scrappy Deville works 4 furlongs. 6-22-19 (Powell)Baby Ice (Outside) and Platinum Equity works 4 furlongs. 6-22-19 (Knapp) 22% 13% Jorge Velez68 $271,509 10 $282,946 12 $926,351 19% 50% 11 Aaron Gryder89 $1,239,901 12 3rd 2nd 2 17 10 $216,677last_img read more

First fossil jaw of Denisovans finally puts a face on elusive human

first_img Thirty-nine years ago, a Buddhist monk meditating in a cave on the edge of the Tibetan Plateau found something strange: a human jawbone with giant molars. The fossil eventually found its way to scientists. Now, almost 4 decades later, a groundbreaking new way to identify human fossils based on ancient proteins shows the jaw belonged to a Denisovan, a mysterious extinct cousin of Neanderthals.The jawbone is the first known fossil of a Denisovan outside of Siberia’s Denisova Cave in Russia, and gives paleoanthropologists their first real look at the face of this lost member of the human family. “We are finally ‘cornering’ the elusive Denisovans,” paleoanthropologist María Martinón-Torres of the National Research Center on Human Evolution in Burgos, Spain, wrote in an email. “We are getting their smiles!”Together, the jaw’s anatomy and the new method of analyzing ancient proteins could help researchers learn whether other mysterious fossils in Asia are Denisovan. “We now can use this fossil and this wonderful new tool to classify other fossil remains that we can’t agree on,” says paleoanthropologist Aida Gomez-Robles of University College London, who reviewed the paper, which appears in Nature this week. 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By Ann GibbonsMay. 1, 2019 , 1:00 PM First fossil jaw of Denisovans finally puts a face on elusive human relatives DONGJU ZHANG/LANZHOU UNIVERSITY Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) A jawbone was found by a Chinese monk in a holy cave high on the Tibetan Plateau.  The international team of researchers also reports that the jawbone is at least 160,000 years old. Its discovery pushes back the earliest known presence of humans at high altitude by about 120,000 years.A massive search for Denisovans has been underway ever since paleogeneticists extracted DNA from the pinkie of a girl who lived more than 50,000 years ago in Denisova Cave and found she was a new kind of human. Max Planck Society researchers have since sequenced DNA from several Denisovans from the cave, but the fossils—isolated teeth and bits of bone—were too scanty to show what this enigmatic hominin looked like. Denisovans must have been widespread, because many living people in Melanesia and Southeast Asia carry traces of DNA from multiple encounters between modern humans and Denisovans. But although intriguing fossils across Asia could be Denisovan, they have not yielded the DNA that could confirm their identity.Enter the new jawbone, found by an unidentified monk in Baishiya Karst Cave in Xiahe county in China at an altitude of 3200 meters on the margins of the Tibetan Plateau, according to co-author Dongju Zhang, an archaeologist at Lanzhou University in northwestern China. She traced the jawbone’s discovery by interviewing local people in Xiahe, who told her they remembered human bones from the large cave, which is next to a Buddhist shrine and is still a holy place as well as a tourist attraction. Recognizing the jaw’s unusual nature, the monk gave it to the sixth Gung-Thang living Buddha, one of China’s officially designated “living Buddhas,” who consulted scholars and then gave the jaw to Lanzhou University. The jawbone was so “weird” that researchers there didn’t know how to classify it, and it sat on shelves for years, Zhang says. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country DONGJU ZHANG/LANZHOU UNIVERSITY She and geologist Fahu Chen, also from Lanzhou University and the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research in Beijing, showed the jaw to paleoanthropologist Jean-Jacques Hublin of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. After seeing its large molars—as big as ones found in Denisova Cave—Hublin immediately suspected it was Denisovan.Max Planck paleogeneticists couldn’t get DNA from the jaw, but Hublin’s graduate student Frido Welker had found in his doctoral work that Neanderthals, modern humans, and Denisovans differ in the amino acid sequence of key proteins. Welker, now a postdoc at the University of Copenhagen, was able to extract collagen, a common structural protein, from a molar of the Xiahe jawbone. He found its amino acid sequence most closely matched that of Denisovans.Other team members dated a carbonate crust that had formed on the skull by measuring the radioactive decay of uranium in the carbonate. They got a date of 160,000 years ago—a “firm minimum date” for the skull, says geochronologist Rainer Grün of Griffith University in Nathan, Australia, who is not a member of the team.The date suggests Denisovans would have had tens of thousands of years to adapt to the altitude of Tibet by the time modern humans arrived in the region, some 30,000 to 40,000 years ago. Encounters between modern humans and Denisovans adapted to high altitude could explain how the Tibetans of today came by a Denisovan gene that helps them cope with thin air. “It seems likely that ancestral Tibetans interacted with Denisovans, as they began to move upslope,” archaeologist David Madsen of the University of Texas in Austin wrote in an email.The jaw’s features could be a template for spotting other Denisovans. “Its distinct large molars and premolar roots differ from those of Neanderthals,” and the jawbone “is very primitive and robust,” says Hublin, who sees a resemblance to a jawbone found off the coast of Taiwan known as the Penghu mandible.What anatomy can’t confirm, proteins might. “The protein analyses allow us to see landscapes where DNA cannot reach”—from warmer climates or much more ancient sites where fragile DNA doesn’t persist, Martinón-Torres says. Other researchers have a half-dozen fossils they want to test for proteins or compare with the Xiahe jaw.The implications are far-reaching. “Forget the textbooks,” says archaeologist Robin Dennell of the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom. “Human evolution in Asia is far more complex than we currently understand, and probably does involve multiple lineages, some of which probably engaged with our species.”Meanwhile, Chen and Zhang did their first excavation at the cave in December 2018, with permission from local villagers and Buddhists. They dug two small trenches where they have already found stone tools and cut-marked rhino and other animal bones. “We do have hope we’ll find more Denisovans,” Zhang says.last_img read more