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Set of Six – Day Two!

first_imgThe Haka sets the scene nicely for day twoA stirring rendition of the Haka from the invitational New Zealand Under 16’s side set the tone and scene for day two nicely. Up against the strong Central Queensland (B) team, the Kiwis delivered also on the scoreboard with an outstanding 8-7 victory in the dying stages against their Queensland and older counterparts.The young Kiwis will be buoyed by that success following some lopsided results on the opening day. The NZ girls 16’s team showed great composure earlier in the day against the SW-Qld Swans, only to go down 4-8. The 2017 Trans-Tasman at the Sunshine Coast a little early for these future stars to bloom, but certainly showing some promise for the future and perhaps a preview to the Youth Trans-Tasman in Auckland next January.Pool A and B blockbusters in the boys – Pool A match one to behold!Going into this Pool B leaders’ match both NSWCCC and Central Queensland (A) team were almost level pegging with tries for and against with a near thirty-point differential apiece such was the closeness between both sides.And the match of the day at that point played out accordingly with not a struck match between both sides for most of the game. At the half-time break the rain tumbled down and seemingly so too though NSWCCC’s chances in this match, eventually going down 4-10 to the stubborn and sublime Bulls outfit.  While stopping short of a clinic it was certainly clinical by the Bulls.For those tuning in via live streaming or at the packed Sunshine Coast grandstand across in Pool A, they certainly got full value for what they witnessed. It was the NSW Development team who started and finished well against the Pool leaders, North Queensland Cyclones, and seemingly took a bit of wind out of the Cyclones’ hitherto dominant force, while also turbo charging their own claims to the title.In one of the best matches of the tournament and of the highest quality, the ‘NSW Dev’ showed true grit to somehow pull back the game from the mire and a late NQ lead to secure the win, 7-6. For team mentor and TFA-BLK Ambassador, Sam Brisby, it was a very pleasing and entertaining win: “The boys really dug deep and hung in till the end. I actually got up the boys a bit at half-time and it was good to see them respond (and to the Coaches) and hang in, keep to the structures and especially at that age.” The match was notable too for the officiating by SA’s Amanda Sheeky who controlled the match with aplomb along with her male colleagues.The CHS boys jostling for position wellIn Pool C, NSW CHS boys asserted their dominance and credentials for the title outclassing the South Queensland Sharks, 6-4 in another game of the day. The NSW CHS boys survived an earlier scare against the South-West Queensland Swans pipping them at the post 5-4, ahead of their encounter against the Sharks mid-afternoon.For the NSW CHS boys Assistant Coach and Australian Men’s Open star and stalwart, Scott Buckley the side is quietly confident of their chances, despite the close scorelines today. “We have a lot of boys from the country in this team and only one from the city, so it has been a bit of a challenge to get the group together but they’re going great,” he said. “They’re a great bunch of boys here and while we are led well by a couple of key players, including Jesse Curtis and Jack Flanagan, we are really forging ahead as one and building in confidence this week with everyone contributing. The key is there is no one star or stars though; it’s a real team effort but Jesse is leading well from the front and organising the boys on the field equally so.”Quality with a Capital Q-SSTBoth QSST boys and girls teams again sent a reminder and served notice to all competitors. The girls saluted first with a 6-1 victory over the strong South Queensland Sharks to go along with the 10-0 QSST victory over the Sunshine Coast boys to close out the morning’s proceedings. The boys then followed up with a 14-3 win over SA while the girls got their finals campaign purring early with a win over South-West Queensland Swans late in the day. With both sides sitting comfortably atop respective ladders, they won’t be looking into the rear view mirror from here, rather, straight ahead to finals day.Cobras girls close–out Catholic CollegesBrisbane Cobras and NSWCCC girls played out an epic under lights in the day’s penultimate match. Three tries apiece with three minutes to go, it was the spilt chance at one end by NSWCCC that gave Cobras the ascendancy and ultimately the win via an outstretched dive with a minute to play. Australian Women’s player, Emma Sykes was instrumental along with a number of her Cobras team-mates in the win. Fair to say though the NSW CCC side were very impressive against a highly fancied Cobras outfit and both look finals’ ready on top of their Pool B ladder.‘Dev’ downs CHSIn what shaped as an intra-state special to close out the day, it was the NSW development girls’ team that staked its claim for the game against CHS and for later honours, going into the break 4-1 and finishing the job strongly running out 6-3 victors. The top of the table clash in Pool C was willing with both teams fighting hard for territory in the rain with the handling very good considering the conditions. NSW Dev Team mentor, Danni Davis joined her co-coaches in celebrating the win, post-match. “They played absolutely outstanding, I’m really really proud of them. Credit to NSWCHS they didn’t give it to us easy, it was a grinding game, but we got up and it was a really good game.”To view more highlights from Day 2 of 2016 NYC, visit the NYC website. Related Filesss-packages-pdfss-packages_01-pdfRelated LinksWrap up of day 2last_img read more

America First shockandawe hits Bombardier Whats next in tariff fight

first_imgWASHINGTON – There’s no question: The shock-and-awe approach to trade disputes is having an impact in the early days of the Trump administration, with the stunner of a 219-per-cent duty on Bombardier just the latest example of the new tariff-happy, America First climate in Washington.Donald Trump’s commerce secretary even bragged about it when announcing a first duty late Tuesday. In a statement, Wilbur Ross touted a 48 per cent increase from last year in anti-dumping and countervailing cases initiated by the U.S. Department of Commerce.That’s on the heels of a study that found a 26 per cent spike in U.S. trade actions against G20 partners in the first half of this year from the same period in 2016, according to the Center for Economic Policy Research’s Global Trade Alert.Just ask Canadian softwood-lumber producers. They’ve been tasting that punitive medicine for months.The latest decision rewarded Boeing with duties practically three times higher than the U.S. aerospace giant asked for, as it argued that Bombardier’s subsidies from Canadian taxpayers gave it an unfair entry into the U.S. market.Ross appeared to agree: ”The U.S. values its relationships with Canada, but even our closest allies must play by the rules.”It’s only the beginning.As a matter of fact, trade experts consulted late Monday agreed on two things: There’s time to fight back, and friendlier battlefields to fight on. They urged the Canadian government to choose its battles wisely, and not needlessly escalate the dispute.One trade-policy analyst at Washington’s free-market Cato Institute criticized the U.S. department that handled the initial decision.He said later arbiters won’t likely be as hostile.The raison d’etre of the Department of Commerce’s enforcement unit is to protect U.S. companies, said Dan Ikenson — it even offers counselling services to help U.S. companies prepare their complaint.It sides with American petitioners more than 90 per cent of the time and will certainly clobber Bombardier again with a new anti-dumping duty as early as next week, he said.”The Commerce Department is a pit bull,” Ikenson said.”They see it as a sign of success (when they impose a duty)… They’re political.”It’s different in other forums, he added.The case later heads back to the U.S. International Trade Commission, which must determine whether Boeing has actually suffered and, if not, could cancel the duties. Historical stats show a perfectly even track record: 39 per cent affirmative decisions, 39 negative, with 22 per cent of cases withdrawn.And he’s urging the Canadians to try their luck in a third venue: the U.S. domestic court system’s Court of International Trade. He said that court is actually friendlier to foreigners, siding with them in a majority of cases.He said that’s a smarter route than a fourth venue: NAFTA’s Chapter 19 dispute process. He said U.S. policy-makers might find Chapter 19 easier to ignore, given that the current Trump administration hates it, wants to get rid of it in the new NAFTA, and might relish the opportunity to pick a fight challenging its authority.”I’m convinced the courts will find mischief (from Boeing),” he said.”I can’t understand their claim of injury… They don’t even make these damned planes (Bombardier makes).”He compared Boeing’s complaint to a snow-plow salesman suing a bicycle-maker. He also noted the irony of Boeing suing anyone over government assistance, since it’s the No. 1 recipient of government support through the U.S. Export-Import Bank — referred to jokingly in Washington as “the Bank of Boeing.””Boeing is very much at the trough,” he said.Duties are still months away.That’s because the order of up to 125 Bombardier CS100s doesn’t start heading to Delta before the spring. That makes the dispute different from softwood, where producers got whacked immediately on log exports.That will buy both sides more time, said Canada-U.S. trade lawyer Mark Warner.”Everybody’s going to get worked up over this,” said Warner, of MAAW Law in Toronto. ”But calm down, everybody. There’s a ways to go.”It would be a mistake for the Canadian government to make rash decisions in two specific areas, Warner said: the purchase of Boeing Super Hornet fighter jets, and the Chapter 19 discussion in NAFTA negotiations.Canada, he said, should make those other decisions on their merits — and not muck up already-sensitive processes like military purchases and NAFTA.”Keep this out of NAFTA,” he said. ”Have a conversation about Chapter 19 that’s cold-blooded.”The same advice came from a Washington aviation consultant who said he thinks Boeing messed up. Richard Aboulafia said the giant risks hurting itself in a number of global partnerships, over a tiny plane purchase.But he thinks Canada would be compounding the mistake by dragging the issue into the NAFTA discussion: ”Will it? Yeah, you know it might,” he said. ”Should it? Oh God, no. Look this is a very discrete case best decided by experts.”last_img read more

AIs challenge to businesses patenting machinecreated intellectual property

first_imgTORONTO – At a time when artificially intelligent music generator Aiva can be officially recognized as a composer by a society of professional French artists, the question of who owns the copyright to machine-generated works is as complex and complicated as understanding the algorithm behind it.Is it the German operators that created the AI in 2016, or is it the deep learning machine itself?That was one of the questions a panel of intellectual property experts grappled with at an AI conference in Toronto hosted by Osgoode Hall Law School last week.As businesses struggle to keep step with the rapid advancement in AI, policies and laws are also being stretched, said lawyer Carole Piovesan of McCarthy Tetrault LLP.“Canada is really at the precipice, as is much of the world, of trying to define what its legal framework is going to look like in the face of AI,” she said.“But with the current pace of AI innovation — it’s happening so quickly and it’s of such a transformative nature — that policy-makers are being forced to anticipate issues that don’t necessarily exist here and now.”Maya Medeiros, a patent and trademark agent with Norton Rose Fulbright, said the current legal regime doesn’t provide clear protection for AI creations, meaning registering patents and allocating copyright protection for AI inventions and works can be problematic.“What often become very important issues from a copyright and patent perspective is ownership, inventorship and authorship — because authorship and inventorship lead to ownership. You need to figure that all out when you’re looking at the chain of title,” she said.“So when you have machine-generated intellectual property, well, who is that author? Is this work even an artistic work? Is there creativity if the machine is generating that? Is this protectable by copyright? Does this protection actually extend to machines and who is ultimately the owner of this?”But all of this isn’t to say there aren’t any protections afforded to AI. Medeiros noted that copyright does protect computer code as a literary work, which is actually a technology product itself, “so that’s a very important aspect for an AI innovator.”Still, she added, the legal landscape around AI and intellectual property is shifting constantly, requiring companies to be savvy about how they practice.Medeiros said one of the ways her firm is helping companies navigate such issues is by bringing a person into the loop as much as possible to help create that link between a human creator and the work.“If the AI can come up with a solution on its own, that might be a more efficient mechanism,” she said. “But if the AI is processing, say, a thousand or million different options and presenting 20 to a human user, and then a human user selects one or two or three of those options, then perhaps that might help strengthen the claim to ownership.”For Piovesan, concerns over AI ownership could be seen as undermining to the founding legal principles behind intellectual property protection that innovation be incentivized through recognition and reward.“Is there any evidence to suggest that AI will be incentivized to create for reward? And if not, then are some of our first principles under IP law being challenged because of the nature of AI?” she asked.As for Aiva — lauded last year by French music society SACEM for its classical studio album Genesis — the jury is still out as to whether the algorithm can legally be considered a composer with its own copyright entitlements, as it has yet to be challenged in court, Medeiros said.“AI is creating music, it’s creating art, it’s writing — so it will be interesting to see how policies adapt and how protections will be granted.”last_img read more

Union Cabinet condoles Parrikars death

first_imgNew Delhi: The Union Cabinet on Monday condoled the death of Goa Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar who passed away at his private residence in Panaji on Sunday evening after a prolonged battle with advanced pancreatic cancer. He was 63. The Cabinet also extended condolences to the former Defence Minister’s family and the people of Goa on behalf of the Central government and the entire nation. It observed a two-minute silence and also approved a day of mourning at the Centre and flying the national flag at half-mast on Monday across the country. Also Read – MP woman hangs herself after killing three children “The Cabinet expresses profound sorrow at the sad demise of Manohar Parrikar. In his passing away, the country has lost a veteran and distinguished leader, affectionately called as the Chief Minister of commoners,” a Cabinet statement said. It observed that Parrikar would be remembered for his simplicity and his abilities as an exceptional administrator. “His contribution to the building of modern Goa and to the modernization of India’s Armed Forces as well as improvement to the lives of ex-servicemen will never be forgotten.” Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’ Born on December 13, 1955, at Mapusa, Goa, Parrikar was educated at Loyola School, Margao and later graduated in Metallurgical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Mumbai in 1978. Before entering politics, Parrikar had joined the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) at a young age and became a Mukhya Shikshak (Chief Instructor) in the final years of his schooling itself. After graduating from IIT, he resumed RSS work in Mapusa and became a Sanghchalak at the age of 26. As a member of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), Parrikar was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Goa in 1994. He became the Chief Minister of Goa for the first time on October 24, 2000 and continued till February 27, 2002. He was re-elected as Chief Minister on June 3, 2002 and served till February 2, 2005. Parrikar became Chief Minister of Goa for the third time on March 9, 2012, and continued till November 8, 2014. On November 9, 2014, he became Union Minister of Defence and continued till March 13, 2017. He was again sworn in as Chief Minister of Goa on March 14, 2017. Parrikar was awarded the ‘Distinguished Alumnus Award’ by IIT Mumbai in 2001, Honorary Doctorate by National Institute of Technology, Goa in 2018 and the Dr. S.P. Mukherjee Award in 2018, among others. He is survived by his two sons.last_img read more

EC rejects govts request to publicise summer camps in Delhi govt schools

first_imgNEW DELHI: The Election Commission Tuesday turned down the AAP government’s request to release advertisements about summer camps in government schools prompting Deputy Chief Minister Manish Sisodia to write a letter to the poll body to reconsider its decision.The EC has pointed out that it has no objection to running summer camps which is part of AAP government’s Mission Buniyad Programme, subject to the condition that the appeal to send their wards to the camp has to be made to the parents through schools and not through print, TV or radio advertisements. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderSisodia, who is also Delhi’s Education Minister, questioned the “basis” on which the request has been rejected. “I feel extremely disappointed that the ECI chose to look at this issue from a very narrow political lens, completely ignoring the interest of lakhs of children largely from marginalised section of society. The success of the camp is contingent upon support of parents which is ensured through regular reach out to them by government using print media, TV and radio,” Sisodia said in a letter to the ECI. Also Read – Two brothers held for snatchingsHe said by exercising your power to stop a simple message to the poor parents asking them to send their children to school during summer vacation, do you really think you are aiding in conducting free and fair elections? “The elections will be over in the next one month but the loss to lakhs of children cannot be compensated if you allow your unjustified decision to stay on,” he added. During a press conference, Sisodia said,”Did the EC even think for a while as to what mode to be adopted by the school to ask the poor parents to come to school in the first place?” The summer camps in Delhi government’s school, an initiative of the AAP dispensation will be organised from May 16 to June 9 for classes 3 to 8.last_img read more

Dayton Does Matter
Dayton Does Matter

Most office pools — and a certain billion-dollar bracket contest — insist the NCAA Tournament still has the pleasing, symmetrical, 64-team format: Six rounds, each winnowing the field by half, for a total of 63 games, 63 losers and one winner. Fans, likewise, haven’t gotten over the habit of calling the round of 64, played out over the manic Thursday and Friday of this week, the first round.But the real first round is happening now in Dayton, Ohio, and for the fourth straight year, it really matters. In the so-called play-in games, eight teams will compete on Tuesday and Wednesday for four spots in the round of 64. And two of the winners will have a real chance at a deep tournament run — a better chance than you’d think if you’d glanced at the contenders’ resumes on Selection Sunday. Their first-round — I mean, round-of-64 — opponents could regret having to face them. And you, too, could regret filling out your bracket before the opening-round games are done: North Carolina State and the winner between Iowa and Tennessee could shake up the strong Midwest region.The play-in games aren’t just a gimmick. Like wild-card rounds in the playoffs for the NFL and MLB, they help sort the contenders from the also-rans. Teams that have to play, and win, a contest before facing their next opponent have momentum, an actual phenomenon in college basketball.1As my colleague Benjamin Morris will show in an upcoming article.Most important, play-in games provide vital data about teams’ current strength, which is hard to get from their schedules, littered as they are with non-tournament teams and results from months ago. Winning the play-in game, the most recent and important contest to date against a strong opponent, is a big indicator of a team’s ability today.The baseball playoffs have validated the potency of this combination of momentum and trial by fire. Wild-card teams that have won their first MLB playoff series have won their next series about half the time, despite facing opponents with home-field advantage and, usually, a better record. Winners in the NFL playoff wild-card round, on the other hand, have slightly underperformed expectations, winning three fewer games against rested opponents (out of 124) than would be expected based on their regular-season performance.2This finding is based on NFL playoff data provided by ESPN Stats & Information, combined with Simple Rating System scores from Pro Football Reference, and this formula for converting SRS into win probability (assuming home-field advantage is worth 2.5 points). Why are the NFL playoffs so different from baseball and basketball? Two untested hypotheses: 1) The extra week of rest matters more because the sport is so physically demanding; and 2) SRS understates the gap in quality between bye teams and wild-card winners because many top teams rest starters after clinching byes, artificially deflating their ratings. Also notable: More recently, the NFL playoffs have looked a lot more like MLB’s. Over the last nine postseasons, wild-card winners have won their next game against bye teams 15 times, compared to an expected total of 12 wins.Sorting contenders from also-rans is particularly helpful in college basketball, a sport that’s particularly hard to predict from regular-season results. Each team has played fewer than 10 percent of other Division I teams. Top teams come from more conferences in college basketball than in football, making each team’s average conference game less meaningful as a postseason preview. Many regular-season starting lineups are a mix of new players and players who have never played with them, meaning November results may predict little about March results.From 2001, when the play-in concept was introduced, through 2011, this sorting mechanism didn’t matter much, because the single game decided which team would offer itself up for ritual sacrifice in the next round. In those days, play-in games pitted two would-be No. 16 seeds against each other for a chance at a game against a No. 1 seed. Those games aren’t unwinnable, yet they were never won.Those 10 underdogs did slightly better than expected in the round of 64. Their Simple Rating System3Simple Rating System is, as its name suggests, a basic way of evaluating teams based on their schedule strength and margin of victory. score heading into the tournament, along with the SRS of their top-seeded round-of-64 opponents, suggested they should have lost those games by an average of 29 points. Instead, they lost by an average of 27 points — a layup better per blowout.Since 2011, though, the play-in round has expanded to four games, with four of the teams competing to be seeded from 11th to 14th. These teams have a lot more to play for: They aren’t going to face a top-two seed in their next game, so they have a fighting chance of winning.The NCAA’s move was both innovative and retrospective: The 1983 and 1984 tournaments — with field sizes of 52 and 53 teams, respectively — also had play-in games, then called an opening round. Winners advanced to the first round, which was then also a kind of preliminary round of its own, pitting outsider teams against each other for a chance to play the top 16 teams, which each got two byes.The back-to-the-future tournament restructuring of 2011 immediately paid dividends. Virginia Commonwealth beat the University of Southern California for an 11 seed in the Southwest region, where VCU was a 10-point underdog to Georgetown, according to pre-tournament SRS. Instead, VCU crushed Georgetown by 18 points. And that was no fluke — the Rams then routed third seed Purdue by 18 and went on to the Final Four.VCU’s run is an outlier; you’d want good odds to bet on any play-in winner reaching this year’s Final Four in Arlington, Texas. But it’s also consistent with the historical data. Since 1980,4As far back as our data set goes 61 percent of 109 teams that had to win an opening or first-round game exceeded SRS expectations in their next game, against an opponent with a bye. The data set spans the play-in games of the past 13 tournaments, plus the opening rounds and first rounds in the early 1980s, when more teams got at least one bye. And the average team outperformed its rating relative to its opponent by two points. An extra layup doesn’t matter in a blowout, but it could swing a close 5-12 matchup.The sample size here is too small to be definitive: The standard deviation of teams’ performance relative to expectations is almost 10 points. But other findings corroborate this one. For instance, the analysis so far hasn’t accounted for how play-in teams that won their next game did later on in the tournament. But many went on to make deep tournament runs. VCU was the seventh opening-round winner to get to the Final Four. The 1980 Final Four featured three teams that had to play their way into the main, 32-team bracket. And Jim Valvano’s North Carolina State championship team of 1983 was a No. 6 seed that didn’t get a first-round bye.Seven semifinalist berths is a remarkable yield from this group of teams. Treat the 32 opening-round winners who won their next game as you would any other team in that round of the tournament, and you’d expect seven of them to reach the Final Four. And yet these were no ordinary teams. Each was, after all, flawed — it was in the opening-round game for a reason. None was seeded in the top four in its region.Don’t take this as advice to write in any of this week’s play-in winners for a trip to Arlington. The most important factor in predicting winners will remain teams’ relative strength through the season. But if you’re looking for an edge in a bracket contest, you could do worse than backing a play-in winner. And if you’re a fan of a team slotted to play one, hope your team’s coaching staff has been keeping a close eye on Dayton.CORRECTION (March 19, 11:00 a.m.): An earlier version of this article said four teams would match up in two play-in games. Eight teams will play four play-in games this week in Dayton. read more

Mens Hockey No 5 Ohio State downs Mercyhurst to begin second half

Ohio State men’s hockey players celebrate after a goal in the second period of the game against UMass on Oct. 19. Ohio State fell 6-3. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorFollowing Ohio State’s 27-day break, the Buckeyes returned to action with a sweep of the Mercyhurst Lakers by scores of 3-1 and 5-4.Ohio State (11-4-3, 4-2-2-2 Big Ten) dominated the Lakers (8-10-2, 6-5-1 Atlantic Hockey) on special teams and limited Mercyhurst’s shots throughout the series to secure the pair of wins.Game 1Ohio State won the first game of the series against Mercyhurst 3-1 including the first goal of the season by Ohio State junior defenseman Matt Miller. The teams failed to find the net in the first period despite a combined 25 shots between the two squads. Mercyhurst had an opportunity to score on the power play in the first 20 minutes, but the special teams of the Buckeyes held strong and killed the penalty. Scoring opened up midway through the second period as sophomore forward Austin Pooley scored for the second time this season. Pooley was assisted by senior forward Brendon Kearney and junior forward Sam McCormick. The goal came shortly after a failed power play attempt by the Buckeyes after Mercyhurst was called for having too many players on the ice. Overall, Ohio State converted on two of its five power play opportunities on the night and killed all six penalties it faced.Neither squad scored for the remainder of the period, and the score remained 1-0 in favor of the Buckeyes until Miller scored to increase the Buckeyes’ lead. Miller found the net during a five-on-three power play after two Lakers picked up penalties within a minute of each other. Senior forwards Dakota Joshua and Mason Jobst assisted on the goal.Mercyhurst scored with under a minute remaining in the game with an empty net to make it a one-score game, but the Buckeyes’ defense held strong and even added an additional empty net goal by Jobst with two seconds remaining to make the final 3-1. Jobst was assisted by Kearney, his second assist of the game. Redshirt senior goaltender Sean Romeo allowed one goal on 20 shots faced, with the one goal coming during a six-on-five. Through his first nine games he started this season, Romeo has allowed 18 goals and is averaging 2.19 goals allowed per game in addition to a .916 save percentage.Game 2In more of a high-scoring affair, Ohio State finished the sweep of the Lakers, winning 5-4 on a game-winning goal by senior defenseman Sasha Larocque.Mercyhurst took their first lead of the series midway through the first period, an even-strength goal by freshman forward Geoff Kitt. The Buckeyes responded just over four minutes later with a goal by junior forward Ronnie Hein, assisted by Larocque and junior forward Tanner Laczynski, his 10th of the season.The Buckeyes followed up the score with a power play goal by senior forward Freddy Gerard, his sixth goal of the season. Gerard was assisted by Hein and Laczynski, his 11th assist of the season.Saturday’s game was the 100th game played by Gerard for Ohio State. Through Saturday’s game, he has scored 18 goals, 26 assists and 44 points during his career at Ohio State.In the second period, Mercyhurst scored two unanswered goals to take the lead over Ohio State, one coming on the power play and the other at even strength just over three minutes in. Junior forward Carson Meyer responded just 20 seconds later to tie the game 3-3, assisted by Joshua and senior forward John Wiitala.With six minutes left in the second period, Mercyhurst found the net to once again take the lead, but less than four minutes later, Meyer once again scored to tie the game. With his two goals against Mercyhurst, Meyer now sits at six goals on the year, tied for No. 2 on the team with Hein. Ohio State scored on three of its four attempts on the power play Saturday night and allowed the Lakers to convert on one of their three attempts. Overall, the Buckeyes were three for nine in the series and killed all but one of the Laker’s nine tries with the man advantage.The tie was eventually broken by Larocque midway through the third period with his second goal of the season to give Ohio State the 5-4 lead, and from there the Buckeyes ran with the lead, limiting Mercyhurst to only seven shot attempts in the third period. Freshman forward Gustaf Westlund assisted on the goal, his 11th of the season.The five goals by the Buckeyes were tied for the most they’ve scored this season, also finding the net five times against Penn State on Nov. 24. The Buckeyes outshot the Lakers 94-47 in the series.Sophomore forward Tommy Nappier allowed four goals on 26 shots. So far this season, he has allowed 16 goals and has a .941 save percentage.The Buckeyes will stay at home to take on Michigan State on Jan. 4 and 5. The puck drops on Friday at 7 p.m. and Saturday at 8 p.m. read more

Mayor Faulconer weighs in on looming Government shutdown
Mayor Faulconer weighs in on looming Government shutdown

first_img Mike McKinnon III Categories: Local San Diego News, National & International News, Politics Tags: Donald Trump, Kevin Faulconer FacebookTwitter January 18, 2018 As I made very clear today, our country needs the security of the Wall on the Southern Border, which must be part of any DACA approval.— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 10, 2018Three days later, members of Congress brought him a bill that he quickly turned down. He responded to the proposal with these two tweets: Congress is facing a Friday Jan. 19 deadline to pass a spending bill, which helps determine the government’s budget and discretionary spending for the fiscal year. Last week, President Trump held a bipartisan meeting with members of Congress regarding the looming government shutdown. President Trump made it clear that funding for the wall must be part of any immigration deal Congress brings to his desk. He tweeted the following after the meeting: Mike McKinnon III, Updated: 4:38 PMcenter_img Posted: January 18, 2018 Most #Dreamers are living in the only country they have ever known. They are our neighbors, small business owners, students and veterans. They need our support. The time is now for Congress to act. #IStandWithDreamers #DACA pic.twitter.com/Gl4Xq8SW3I— Kevin Faulconer (@Kevin_Faulconer) January 18, 2018The deadline to come up with a deal is just a day away, we will continue to update as more information comes to the newsroom. The so-called bipartisan DACA deal presented yesterday to myself and a group of Republican Senators and Congressmen was a big step backwards. Wall was not properly funded, Chain & Lottery were made worse and USA would be forced to take large numbers of people from high crime…..— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 12, 2018 ….countries which are doing badly. I want a merit based system of immigration and people who will help take our country to the next level. I want safety and security for our people. I want to stop the massive inflow of drugs. I want to fund our military, not do a Dem defund….— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 12, 2018Since this proposal, President Trump has repeatedly tweeted his belief that the Democrats don’t really care about the “Dreamers.” You can see the tweets on his twitter feed here.The Democrats don’t want to give President Trump funding for his promised border wall but want to save the DACA deal. On the other hand, Republicans say the Democrats are putting people who are here illegally at a bigger priority than our national security. In the bipartisan meeting, President Trump said he would, “take the heat” on a deal that saved the “Dreamers” if he got funding for the wall.Thursday morning, San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer weighed in on the possible government shutdown with posts to his Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts. Thursday morning, Mayor Faulconer posted the following: Mayor Faulconer weighs in on looming Government shutdownlast_img read more

Sources CFO on the Block

first_imgThe Economist Group—the U.K.-based publisher of its flagship the Economist magazine—is said to be quietly looking for a buyer for CFO magazine. According to a pair of sources familiar with the process, the Economist Group has been in negotiations with a number of potential buyers, possibly since January. “It’s been a pretty well-guarded secret,” one source who wished to remain anonymous told FOLIO:. “It’s been an informal auction process. They’ve been reaching out to people through third party groups.” Another source indicated that the Economist Group had retained the Jordan, Edmiston Group to broker a sale. When contacted by FOLIO:, a JEGI spokesperson declined to comment.An Economist Group spokesperson declined to “comment on rumors.” One of the interested parties, according to one source, was Stamford, Connecticut-based Asset International, which is backed by private equity group Austin Ventures. “They got pretty close to a deal this summer,” the source said. “From what I understand, they had an agreement in principal but, with CFO’s falling revenues, the deal dissolved.”  Asset International CEO Jim Casella declined to comment when asked about the negotiations. In July, Asset International acquired financial data and analytics firm Strategic Insight. A month earlier, Asset bought The Trade Ltd, the London-based publisher of The Trade and other products targeting institutional investors and the buy-side electronic trading community. The Economist Group shut down CFO Europe in June following the closings of CFO Asia and CFO China in February. Overall, the Economist Group has seen a record year. The company reported that profits jumped 26 percent to $92 million for the fiscal year ended March 31 and, later, that global circ. for the Economist magazine grew 6 percent to 1,418,013—double what it was a decade ago. Meanwhile, the company in August completed the acquisition of Congressional Quarterly from Florida’s Times Publishing Company. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. While the CQ acquisition and a recent staff reduction could suggest that the Economist Group might hold onto CFO, at least for now, a source in the M&A market said he wouldn’t be surprised if the company “continued to rationalize its portfolio.”last_img read more

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Buckley Is The Only Legitimate Republican Candidate In
LETTER TO THE EDITOR Buckley Is The Only Legitimate Republican Candidate In

first_imgLike Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedLETTER TO THE EDITOR: Buckey Does An Amazing Job Wherever She Dedicates Her TimeIn “Government”BREAKING NEWS: 19th Middlesex State Rep Election Results Are In — Dave Robertson WinsIn “Government”STATE REP RACE: Voting Records Show Prinzivalli Voted Only Once Before Launching Candidacy; Campaign DisputesIn “Government” Dear Editor,I am writing this, my first letter to the editor — to ANY editor — in the excitement that the 19th Middlesex finally has a legitimate Republican candidate in Erin Buckley.For literally decades, GOP voters had the choice of either no choice or bad choice; it never mattered which option ended-up on the ballot. The 2018 election seemed doomed to be no different, that is until an experienced and involved candidate stepped into the breach and stepped-up for Tewksbury and Wilmington.Erin wears many hats around town, serving on multiple boards, and her and her husband can always be seen out and about, helping these people or that. They are young and they are without pretension. They know that there is a lack of people their age who are involved and they pull more than their own weight.This is the commitment that Erin brings to her campaign and it is the same commitment that she will bring to Beacon Hill on the behalf of all of us.She has been in the State House as an intern in the Governor’s Office and as a Legislative Aide, so let’s now send her back to Boston as our Representative!Jon WalshTewksburylast_img read more

2 students go missing as a boat sinks in Padma river
2 students go missing as a boat sinks in Padma river

first_imgTwo students went missing as a boat sank in the Padma River at Thanpur Kheyaghat in Bagha upazila on Friday.The deceased were identified as Sabuj Ali, 18, a class XI student of Durudia College and son of Mantu of Sultanpur village and Manirul 14, a class X student of Thanpur High School and son of Chander Ali of Chandur area of the upazila.Local people said a boat carrying 45-50 passengers capsized in the middle of the river around 6:30 am.All but the two boys managed to swim ashore.The victims met the tragic accident while going to Kheyaghat area for harvesting jute.On information, the divers from Lalpur Fire Service Station went to the spot for carrying out salvage operation.last_img read more

Myanmar rebuffs UN Rohingya probe
Myanmar rebuffs UN Rohingya probe

first_imgMyanmar on Saturday rejected the UN rights council’s decision to investigate allegations that security officers have murdered, raped and tortured Rohingya Muslims, saying the probe would only “inflame” the conflict.The Geneva-based body agreed Friday to “urgently” dispatch a fact-finding mission to the Southeast Asian country, focusing on claims that police and soldiers have carried out violations against the Rohingya in Rakhine state.The army crackdown, launched in October after militants killed nine policemen, has sent tens of thousands of Rohingya fleeing across the border to Bangladesh.Escapees have given UN investigators gruesome accounts of security officers stabbing babies to death, burning people alive and committing widespread gang rape.The allegations have heaped enormous pressure on Myanmar’s one-year-old civilian government, which has vigorously swatted back calls for an international investigation.Myanmar’s foreign affairs ministry on Saturday stopped short of saying it would block the UN-backed probe but said it “has dissociated itself from the resolution as a whole”.”The establishment of an international fact-finding mission would do more to inflame, rather than resolve the issues at this time,” it added.Myanmar is carrying out its own domestic inquiry into possible crimes in Rakhine.But rights groups and the UN have dismissed the body, which is led by retired general turned vice president Myint Swe, as toothless.The recent crackdown is only the latest conflict to beleaguer the stateless Rohingya, who are denied citizenship and face brutal discrimination in the Buddhist-majority country.More than 120,000 Rohingya have languished in grim displacement camps ever since bouts of religious violence between Muslims and Buddhists ripped through Rakhine state in 2012.Most are not allowed to leave the squalid encampments, where they live in piecemeal shelters with little access to food, education and healthcare.last_img read more

911 after 16 yrs New Yorkers still on edge
911 after 16 yrs New Yorkers still on edge

first_img.It’s a typical late summer weekend in New York’s Times Square, and tourists from around the world are snapping pictures beneath the commercial hub’s iconic neon billboards-watched closely by a heavy contingent of police.Four cruisers are parked in the middle of the busy intersection, and pedestrian zones have been surrounded by barriers to stop cars from ramming the crowd, a mode of attack favored by violent extremists in recent years.“I don’t like to come to places like this,” says Sue Garcia, a massage therapist from Brooklyn. “Or anywhere where incidents have happened repeatedly-the fear comes to mind.”Fear of an attack. Fear of another 9/11, the deadliest terrorist assault in history, when almost 3,000 lives were extinguished, many in the rubble of the World Trade Center.For New Yorkers who lost loved ones, narrowly survived or just witnessed the event, memories remain fresh and old wounds are re-opened on its anniversary. And a perpetual state of high alert is the new normal.Garcia, now 33, was a high schooler when the planes slammed into the Twin Towers. She saw them burn then collapse, and walked all the way home like hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers that day after metro services were suspended.“I was there, I saw it over and over again, I don’t need to think about it,” she says.But her mind always drifts toward the horrors of that day, whenever it is mentioned on TV, or even “when I hear an airplane: it is like the trigger to the thought. It has subsided over the years but it is still there” she adds.Or while waiting to meet her sister in Times Square, “The Crossroads of the World,” that symbolizes the spirit of New York.Close calls -Twice in recent years, catastrophe loomed. In May 2010, police discovered a car packed with explosives and primed for carnage.In May, a mentally-ill ex-soldier deliberately drove his sedan into 23 pedestrians, killed a young American tourist.The episodes of anxiety described by Garcia are a burden borne by many New Yorkers.For those directly affected, the anniversary of the attacks are the “most dreaded date” of the year and post-traumatic stress can remain for an individual’s entire life, says Charles Strozier, a psychoanalyst and author of a book that documents the experiences of survivors and witnesses.“There was a collective trauma, the sense of having been proven to be not invulnerable,” he says.“To say that New Yorkers are still traumatized is an exaggeration. But they think about it, they are aware of it, they do have active fears just below the surface of consciousness about things like bombs in the subways,” adds the professor, who watched the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) from his office just off Union Square.Many are also convinced that, even though recent terror attacks have focused on Europe, it is New York, the beating heart of the Western world, that remains the prime target.Prime target -“What better target, unfortunately, than NYC?” asks Tim Lambert, an IT consultant.Then, as now, he worked on the southern tip of Manhattan near the WTC site. The city, he says, is a “magnet for people from all over the world… It symbolizes the freedoms that we have, the money that we have. What better way to make a statement?”The 52-year-old says a heavier police presence is now a fact of life that people have come to expect.“I am not comfortable with it, but it is the new norm. The world is changing and the terrorist threat is part of that change,” he adds.They are apprehensions shared by the city’s leaders.“Thank God this is not an act of terrorism. It is an isolated incident,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said in June when a doctor went on a shooting rampage in a hospital where he used to work in Bronx, killing one and injuring six.When the car ramming incident happened in May, police chief James O’Neill admitted “the worst went through my mind.”To protect its 8.5 million inhabitants, New York has to remain fully prepared.See something, say something -A 38,000 strong police force that keeps watch over the city’s public spaces, a massive network of cameras providing round-the-clock surveillance and a ubiquitous campaign to remind denizens “If you see something, say something,” are all reminders of the cost of security.Since 2001, the city has had its own anti-terrorist unit, which today has about 2,000 personnel and representatives in several foreign capitals, according to Robert Strang, president of the New York-based Investigative Management Group.The agency has at times courted controversy, notably for its programme that monitored citizens frequenting the city’s mosques which was criticized for being discriminatory.But the intelligence network is essential and overall and has been successful in preventing major new attacks, said Strang.The US financial capital also wants to set an example when it comes to honoring the victims of terror abroad.After recent attacks in Europe, authorities were quick to offer their condolences and assistance, and turned off the lights at the Empire State Building in a mark of solidarity.And the 11 September Memorial, with its two immense black granite craters, built on the site of the Twin Towers, has become a site of meditation and mourning not just for New York but for the entire world.It’s “a memorial to all the terror victims in a way,” said Monique Mol, a 52-year-old Dutch tourist.“It is like these people will live forever-like the pyramids and the mummified pharaohs in Egypt.”last_img read more

The Resurrection of State Center
The Resurrection of State Center

first_imgThe $1.5 billion State Center Project hopes to revitalize several neighborhoods in West Baltimore. The development’s implementation of an Economic Inclusion Plan – perhaps a first of its kind in the city – is attracting attention from other urban communities grappling with similar issues. “From 1930 to 1950 Wylie Avenue in Pittsburgh’s Hill District was one of the swingingest places in town. Not only did many of the world’s greatest jazz musicians grow up on the Hill; other prominent Pittsburgh blacks made names for themselves that stretched far beyond the boundaries of the city’s own version of Harlem,” wrote veteran music journalist Lynne Margolis for the Observer-Reporter of Pittsburgh in 1991. The Hill District in Pittsburgh, like so many other vanguard Black American communities of the past, has been crumbling for decades under the weight of ill-conceived urban renewal policies and various other strains of inner city wretchedness. “The city of Pittsburgh decided to tear down and displace at least 15,000 residents, about 5,000 families. They tore down what was then the real business center of the community and…they did it to build what became the Civic Arena,” said Pittsburgh City Councilman Daniel Lavelle, who represents the city’s Sixth District, about former home of the National Hockey League’s Pittsburgh Penguins, closed in June 2010 and demolished in March 2012.”What I’ve always said … was if we look to rebuild the lower Hill District, I didn’t care about what was actually built. I care about the economics of the building,” Lavelle said. “There’s no way that we are going to rebuild 28 acres of land in the most impoverished African-American neighborhood and not recreate some wealth in this community,” he added. For residents of West Baltimore who still remember the heyday of iconic Pennsylvania Avenue the saga of the Hill should have special resonance.The re-boot of the massive State Center Project promises thousands of jobs for residents of several West Baltimore neighborhoods, which is part of what some characterize as a landmark Economic Inclusion Plan. Other communities of color around the country, like the Hill District of Pittsburgh, are watching closely. “When we first started talking to Caroline (Caroline Moore the lead developer of SCP) a few years ago about the local hiring piece [there] really wasn’t a strong model for us to kind of build a template off of,” said Pastor Sheridan Todd Yeary, of Douglas Memorial Community Church, on Madison Avenue within one of the nine neighborhoods touched by the State Center Project.Douglas is one member of Community Churches for Community Development and Yeary, along with the Rev. Alvin Hathaway of Union Baptist Church (a member of CCCD) have been integral in constructing the Economic Inclusion Plan. Community leaders of the Hill District have reached out directly to Hathaway, Yeary and the CCCD for guidance as they navigate the development process in Pittsburgh. “We’ve got to deliver for the community we’ve got to deliver for other communities that are looking at this for a model,” Yeary said.”We are really, as part of this Economic Inclusion Plan process, trying to change the national conversation around how you do collaborative development that engages the community … from start to finish,” he added.Yeary believes the evolving paradigm of collaborative development has far-reaching consequences beyond West Baltimore. “There is going to be a fundamentally significant transformation of Baltimore City as we know it and its going on (in) real time and if we don’t get engaged in justice as a lifestyle what you’re going to find is that there is going to be mass displacement of some communities to the preference of other types of communities; some of it may be intentional some of it may be unintentional, just part of the process,” Yeary explained.”But, what we have to make sure is that stakeholders and advocates for the beloved community, that we make sure that the least amongst us have as much of a share of the stake in the good outcome of the project as anybody else.”last_img read more

GIRL Presents Womens Empowerment Brunch
GIRL Presents Womens Empowerment Brunch

first_imgG.I.R.L. (Got the Intelligence to Rule My Life) is hosting their inaugural “Women’s Empowerment Brunch” on July 19.  The event will have a dynamic group of women for food, fun, and fellowship. There will be opportunities to expand social circles and network with forward-thinking women committed to always being the best versions of themselves.The event will have speakers (Lorra Brown – Lorra Brown Enterprises, the Rev. Bevelyn Gerald – Fort Washington Christian Church, Robin Lake – TechOpps) addressing topics including spirituality, balancing motherhood and relationships, financial basics, and women in business.The event also features vendors with health, lifestyle, and beauty products and an exquisite ‘modern chic’ brunch fusing classic courses and new millennium favorites to ensure attendees are filled mentally and physically. “Our goal with this program is to aid women in our community with the tools to create a balanced and fruitful life,” stated Jovon Gerald, G.I.R.L. Inc.’s Founder.The event is 1-4 p.m., at The Preserve at Piscataway Community Club Ballroom, 2800 Saint Mary’s View Road, Accokeek, Md. The cost is $30 in advance and $35 at the door; only the first 60 registrants will be allowed entry. Proceeds will go to enhance G.I.R.L. Inc.’s mentoring programs. Advance event attendees may register via EventBrite (https://www.eventbrite.com/e/empowerment-and-enrichment-womens-brunch-tickets-10967683637).“I am very fortunate to have this event supported by quality organizations and sponsors. We are hoping that this event is the first of many to come,” stated Gerald.For more information on obtaining press credentials, please contact Jovon Gerald at Jovon@girl-inc.org or 703-915-4705. All other inquiries, please contact G.I.R.L. Inc. at info@girl-inc.org.last_img read more

Rapid turnon of a nuclear transient observed by astronomers
Rapid turnon of a nuclear transient observed by astronomers

first_imgAn international team of astronomers has observed the peculiar activity of a nuclear transient event known as PS1-13cbe. The transient, which occurred in the nucleus of the galaxy SDSS J222153.87+003054.2, experienced a rapid flare-up lasting about 70 days. The finding is reported in a paper published November 8 on arXiv.org. Researchers discover a blazar-like narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further More information: Reza Katebi et al. PS1-13cbe: The Rapid “Turn on” of a Seyfert 1. arXiv:1811.03694 [astro-ph.GA]. arxiv.org/abs/1811.03694 © 2018 Science X Network The observed transient luminosities of PS1-13cbe from the PS1 survey in gr izyP1 filters after correction for Galactic extinction. S: marks the epoch of the LDSS spectrum (MJD 56570). Credit: Katebi et al., 2018. Citation: Rapid ‘turn-on’ of a nuclear transient observed by astronomers (2018, November 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-rapid-turn-on-nuclear-transient-astronomers.html At a redshift of 0.12355, SDSS J222153.87+003054.2 (or SDSS J2221+0030 for short) is a type 2 Seyfert galaxy. It has a central supermassive black hole (SMBH) with an estimated mass of around 20 million solar masses.In general, Seyfert galaxies host active galactic nuclei (AGN) that produce spectra line emissions from highly ionized gas. Astronomers classify these galaxies as type 1 or 2, depending on the emission lines shown by their spectra.However, observations show that various AGN types are observed in the same object at different epochs of time. One explanation of this phenomenon is that some type 2 Seyfert galaxies are actually type 1 with inactive engines. This suggests that type 2 Seyfert galaxies are an evolved version of the type 1.Some AGNs showcase X-ray absorption variations, and are thus called “changing-look” AGNs. Furthermore, in some Seyfert galaxies, the broad emission lines disappear and, while in others broad emission lines appear, what astronomers describe as a “turn-on” of an AGN. So far, the most rapid “turn-ons” observed last less than one year.Now, a team of researchers led by Reza Katebi of Ohio University reports a rapid “turn-on” of the nuclear transient PS1-13cbe in the nucleus of the galaxy SDSS J2221+0030. PS1-13cbe was detected on July 9, 2013 in the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) sky survey. Additional observations of this transient and its host galaxy, that led to the new findings, were conducted by the team using NASA’s Swift spacecraft, the 6.5 m Magellan Clay telescope and the 2.4 m Hiltner telescope.According to the paper, PS1-13cbe brightened in the course of about 70 days and reached a peak total optical luminosity of approximately 10.6 tredecillion erg/s, while its temperature roughly stayed constant. Moreover, this rapid “turn-on” of PS1-13cbe was accompanied by the appearance of broad Balmer lines and hence a transition to a type 1 Seyfert galaxy.”At the time of the outburst, the galaxy changed type to a Seyfert 1 as broad Hα and Hβ appeared and the continuum brightened in the spectrum taken with LDSS3 +57 days after the peak and then changed its type back to a Seyfert 2 as the broad Hα and Hβ disappeared in the spectrum taken with OSMOS 2 years later and did not reappear in spectra taken three and four years after the outburst,” the researchers wrote in the paper.The observations allowed Katebi’s team to conclude that PS1-13cbe is a “changing-look” AGN that has been powered by instabilities in the accretion disk. They added that the “turn-on” of this AGN is among the shortest observed in a “changing look” active galactic nuclei.last_img read more

Flowery treats in the new year
Flowery treats in the new year

first_imgThe capital is ready to host the fifth International Horti Expo 2013 and the eighth International Flora Expo come new year. The exhibition will have theme pavilions on fresh fruits and vegetables, farm machineries, potato products and technologies, cold chain, logistics, organic, medicinal herbal products and floriculture.This expo has the Union Ministry of Agriculture as its principal sponsor along with a host of other departments including the National Medicinal Plant Board and Indian Flowers and Ornamental Plants Welfare Association. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting”Flowers are unique and are for every occasion, even death. A person can refuse chocolate or pastry, but not flowers,’ said S Jafar Naqvi, President, Indian Flowers and Ornamental Plants Welfare Association (iFlora). ‘Due to rising income, craving of the new generation, globalisation and internet, people in India are willing to spend profusely on floral decoration. So, this news would be a relief for anyone wanting a chunk of the bourgeoning Indian floral decoration markets through flowers and floral accessories,’ he said. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixLatest varieties of flowers like anthurium, gerbera and roses from Holland, Thailand, Germany, France and New Zealand will be exhibited in this Flora Expo, where Thailand is considered to be the main country in focus for blooms. There will also be a presentation with the theme of ‘Building Bridges through flowers between nations’. ‘IFlora and Flora Expo aim to increase per capita flower consumption even further to give more impetus to floriculture industry. We can’t have better time, and sky is the limit,’ said Jafar. India has a unique culture of flower consumption in many forms like garlands, flower-carpets, floral rains and floral jewelry etc in all celebrations. The Flora Expo will bring not only conventional flower and gardening industry professionals but also huge amount of buyers from new types of large industry retailers such as home centers, supermarkets, departmental stores and interior shops. And this exhibition is perhaps the only opportunity in India for international suppliers to meet and trade with all of them on one single platform.So flower lovers and  nature enthusiasts can mark their calendars out and enjoy a nice winter evening checking out the blooms  on display.DETAILAt: NSIC Exhibition Complex, Okhla When: 11 to 13 Januarylast_img read more

Kangana to don Khadi on silver screen in Manikarnika
Kangana to don Khadi on silver screen in Manikarnika

first_imgAfter dressing up officials in several government offices, Khadi is now making its way to silver screen. Kangana Ranaut, who is playing the lead role in Manikarnika: The Queen of Jhansi, would showcase the Queen’s love for country’s heritage fabric Khadi in this upcoming Indian epic biographical film. And for the promotion of this signature fabric, the attire of the lead casts of this movie is being sponsored by Khadi and Village Industries Commission (KVIC). Also Read – Add new books to your shelfExpressing pride and pleasure for being a part in the renewal of India’s spirit of Independence, KVIC Chairman Vinai Kumar Saxena said that Rani Laxmibai is one of the fascinating women in terms of what she had done in her life. “Khadi is connected to India’s voice of Independence since time immemorial. But very few people know that some seven decades before Gandhiji’s tryst with Charkha, a girl born in Varanasi as Manikarnika, not only mastered reading the Vedas and Puranas, but also learned weaving before being the Queen of Jhansi,” he said. Speaking further he mentioned, “It is a morale booster in terms of aggressive marketing and promotion strategy for KVIC that she (Kangana Ranaut as Rani Laxmibai) would be spinning the wheel in this movie. It would once again prove that prior to British rule in India, Khadi was flourishing in our country and later it was Charkha that drove the Britishers away from India.” Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveIt may be noted here that sponsored by Khadi and Village Industries Commission (KVIC), the costume line for the film shall be designed by ace designer Neeta Lulla. Lulla has already picked up fabric costing around Rs 26 lakh from KVIC. According to Chairman VK Saxena, the fabric being used for the film includes a mixed bag of silk, cotton, muslin and some wool too. Impressed by the fabric, Lulla is already making plans to use the desi fabric in her personal line too. “I feel Khadi exemplifies a lot of character. I am already in conversation with KVIC to launch a capsule collection worldwide which will be retailed across various outlets to ensure the eco-friendly fabric resonates with the millennial generation,” she said.On the other hand, Kamal Jain, the producer of the movie, said that the entire unit was proud to associate with KVIC and applauded their contribution in providing the best range of Khadi that had added immensely to the range of costumes in the film. “The shooting of the film is underway and these unique costumes play a vital role in revitalizing the glorious history of India,” he said.last_img read more

Offering gift options for Diwali
Offering gift options for Diwali

first_imgHappiness and love are the two things we seek for Diwali, one of the most celebrated festivals across India. This time of the year invokes the feeling of togetherness, joy, divinity and brings with it a beautiful package of moments to be cherished hereafter.While you take care of the festive season’s to-do list, JW Marriott New Delhi Aerocity rounds up some of the most delectable gift items and packages them with love and the promise of a wonderful year ahead. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfStylishly designed and elegantly put together, Diwali gift hampers from JW Marriott New Delhi Aerocity include toothsome goodies, enriching delights, aromatic champagne, macaroons and a token of love as cookies and dry fruits to awe your friends, family, colleagues, and delight the recipients at your thoughtful generosity. With twelve carefully curated boxes, each of them specially designed to suit the gifting need of every luxury connoisseur, the customization starts from 1000/- onwards and the standard gift boxes start from INR 1500 with exotic Indian sweets, chocolate truffles, and fruit cake, while the luxury options go up to over 2 lakhs and include some of the choicest luxury gifts. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveJW Marriott New Delhi Aerocity lends its signature style combining elegance with luxury, to make your Diwali a joyous, prosperous occasion and a beautiful memory that will linger for many years to come… The gifting options include JW classic – exotic Indian sweets, chocolate truffles, dry fruits cake and spiced cashew nuts savoury, everything just in Rs 1500; JW Premium which has exotic Indian sweets and chocolate truffles in Rs 2500; JW Premier having exotic Indian sweets, chocolate truffles, dry fruits cake, spiced cashew nuts savoury, assorted cookies and Ganesha idol, all in just INR 3000. More than you can think of, Marriott is offering options like JW Treat; JW Deluxe; JW Mini Treasure; JW gifts; JW bundle of joy; wooden box; luxury box and treasure box, which ranges up to Rs 25000.last_img read more

Does the driving test need an overhaul

first_imgThe road is wet. Why might a motorcyclist steer round drain covers on a bend?To prevent the motorcycle sliding on the metal drain coversTo avoid splashing pedestrians on the pavement To help judge the bend using the drain covers as marker points To avoid puncturing the tyres on the edge of the drain covers Nick Heath, who has been a driving instructor for 13 years, is all for graduated licensing. The 42-year-old, from Alsager, said: “I think most instructors are in agreement about graduated licencing. I always encourage students to take the Pass Plus training course and I offer a motorway lesson after they pass. “I would like to see a system where you are awarded different coloured licences depending on your training. At the moment you just have the one pink licence but I think if we introduced different colours depending on training it would encourage people to do more training on rural roads. “I think if we had a gold coloured licence for the drivers with full training it would start a hierarchy which would encourage people to get to that standard.” Rob Matthews, who runs Bat Out Of L driving school and oversees the Stoke Approved Driving Instructors group, makes a point of taking his pupils out on rural roads. He said: “I always take my pupils out on rural roads and difficult roads with bends and single tracks. I take them from Werrington to Denford on a route. “I do think that it is correct that rural roads are dangerous. I think that a good instructor will teach a student to drive properly and if possible take them on rural roads not just get them to pass a test as quickly as possible.” Read MoreShould Staffordshire Police use dash cams to catch bad drivers? The concept of a graduated licencing process has also been backed by the Institute of Advanced Motoring, which currently offers courses for qualified drivers to learn about motorways and rural roads. Neil Greig, IAM director of policy and research, said: “The driving test needs to become a much more integrated part of a graduated licensing system that picks up on best practice from around the world. “For instance, Austria has a ‘second phase’ licensing system, where young drivers come back in the first 12 months after the test for further interventions to examine attitude changes and skills. “The driving test today does test a driver’s ability to a very high level, but it has fallen behind what is urgently needed today. This must be addressed as a matter of urgency by the Government.” Read MoreTwo men arrested in connection with serious assault on Dunwoody Way in Crewe The DVSA are currently working on a new test to be introduced that will include more manoeuvres and a sat nav element of the practical test. DVSA chief executive Gareth Llewellyn said: “DVSA’s priority is to help you through a lifetime of safe driving which is why we have modernised the driving test. “This includes driving for longer without instruction, on a wider range of roads at different speeds, and using a sat nav, so we are better testing a driver’s ability. “These changes have been welcomed by the Driving Instructors Association, the BSM and the AA because of the positive impact they will have on road safety.” Next question Get the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailPassing the driving test has become a rite of passage for motorists in the UK. But do new drivers need further training before they can be considered the finished article? Philip Cullinane looks into the issue. Driving tests have been compulsory for all new motorists in the UK since 1935, when they were introduced under the Road Traffic Act. There have been various changes over the decades, such as the theory test in 1996, and the introduction of the hazard perception exam in 2002. From 2018, learners will be able to drive on motorways with their instructors, and there are also calls for pupils to be taught about dangerous rural roads. With the modern motorist having to master so many disciplines before they can be considered the finished article, there is a growing belief that a graduated licensing system is necessary. Such a system would see drivers have to complete a minimum learning period, mandatory training on rural roads and restrictions on newly-qualified drivers before they are awarded their full licence. Road safety charity Brake says that rural roads are the most dangerous that new drivers will face, and that the lack of training is leading to fatalities. poll loadingShould there be a graduated licensing system for new drivers? 0+ VOTES SO FARYes No Jason Wakeford, director of campaigns for Brake, said: “High speeds, sharp bends, narrow lanes, risky overtaking and the presence of vulnerable road users like cyclists, make rural roads the most dangerous by far. “The combination of rural roads and novice drivers is lethal – a staggering 80 per cent of all young car driver fatalities occur in rural locations. “Brake is calling for a total overhaul of the learning to drive system to help cut fatalities and injuries. A graduated licensing system, including a minimum learning period, mandatory training on rural roads and restrictions for newly-qualified drivers – such as a zero drink-drive limit – will allow new drivers to build up more skills and experience over a longer period of time. “This approach has dramatically reduced road casualties in countries including Australia and New Zealand and could save some 400 lives a year if implemented in the UK. “Brake is also calling for a review of rural speed limits and for ‘Voluntary Intelligent Speed Adaptation’, which helps drivers keep within the limit, to be fitted as standard to new cars. “There is also the need for better and more affordable public transport, so fewer young people see starting driving in their teens as a necessity.” Read MoreBig Issue: Why has there been an increase in reports of child neglect in Stoke-on-Trent and Staffordshire? Instructors in the area believe it is important that new drivers learn about varying conditions on different roads. Les Brigham, aged 56, of Milton, said: “I think it is down to the instructor and that learners should be taken on the roads that are available. “I think that being able to take learners on the motorway from 2018 is a step in the right direction. “I do not think that it can become mandatory. For example, how are drivers going to get to rural roads in time? Or how can drivers in northern Scotland get to the motorway when the nearest one is three hours away? “But I think that if a driving instructor can take learners on rural roads than they should.” center_img Question -1 of 20Score -0 of 0 Thanks for taking part in this quizYou scoredReplay quizlast_img read more