Tag Archives 上海夜网论坛

Energy Industry Strikes Back

first_imgHowever, the Herald says Erin Weir, an economist with the United Steelworkers Union in Toronto questioned that statement.He cautioned that a booming oil-and-gas sector in the West creates problems like a high dollar that hurts manufacturing in Central Canada. In addition, he said people are concerned about environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas emissions.He concluded, while the oil and gas industry is an important piece of the puzzle, he believes it’s going too far to say it’s the economic engine of Canada.Advertisement By Dwight FordThe Calgary Hearld says, Alberta’s oil-and-gas industry initiated a board-based publicity campaign yesterday, to raise awareness of the economic benefits of energy and counter what it claims are often misleading and negative perceptions of the sector.The effort will consist of a website, a media campaign and “town hall” style meetings, to promote the role of oil and gas in sectors such as hospitality, retail and construction.- Advertisement -Similar campaigns will be launched in BC and Saskatchewan at a later date.In a speech to the Calgary Chamber of Commerce yesterday, David Collyer, the president of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, said the campaign is really about winning at home and creating a different kind of engagement and relationship with the three western producing provinces. He and others also noted the contributions of oil-and-gas to other parts of the country, including Ontario and Quebec, describing the industry as the economic engine of Canada.Advertisementlast_img read more

Stone Named MVC Defensive Player of the Week

first_imgStone recorded a solo shutout earlier in the year by blanking South Dakota State in a 1-0 victory. Story Links DES MOINES, Iowa — Junior goalkeeper Kelsie Stone was named the Missouri Valley Conference defensive player of the week, the conference announced Monday. Full Release She ranks toward the top of the MVC in multiple goalkeeping statistical categories, including shutouts (T-1st); goals against average (2nd); saves, saves per game, and save percentage (3rd).center_img This is Stone’s first defensive player of the week award this season. She was tabbed as an All-MVC second team selection in 2018. Stone played 76 minutes of Drake’s 1-0 win over Western Illinois, carrying the majority of the workload in earning the team shutout. Stone also notched eight saves to bring her season total to an impressive 43. The Bulldogs host Omaha at 6 p.m. on Tuesday night at Cownie Soccer Complex. Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

Spring Forage Update

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Russ QuinnDTN Staff ReporterOMAHA (DTN) — Kimberly Meier has sold about twice as much alfalfa seed this spring as she normally does.Her region of northern Illinois saw high rates of alfalfa winterkill this spring after a winter of colder-than-normal temperatures. The Ridott, Illinois, farmer and seed dealer said, because of that, she sold about 120 bags of alfalfa this spring, while a normal season would be closer to 60 bags.“We had bad winterkill in this area this year,” Meier told DTN. “And it’s whole fields — I have never seen it this widespread.”The condition of forages across the Midwest is about as diverse as the region itself. The cool, wet spring has afforded ample moisture to most areas, which should be good news when the weather finally warms up, but which has also slowed growth of many forages, potentially affecting overall yields.LOTS OF WINTERKILLAlfalfa winterkill seems to be an issue this spring throughout Wisconsin and stretching into surrounding states such as northern Illinois and eastern Minnesota.Meier said the situation started last fall with extremely wet conditions followed by warm temperatures in January. Then, that was followed by extreme cold in February. While they did have some snowfall around Christmas, most of the snow was melted in the January warmup, exposing the alfalfa plants to the cold during February.From talking to agronomists in the area, most seem to believe this is why the region has seen higher incidents of winterkill, Meier said. The fields most affected appear to be newly seeded field and older stands.Meier said alfalfa producers in her area often flirt with danger by taking a last cutting in the fall and not allowing for much regrowth before winter hits, which can weaken plants and lead to winterkill. This appears to be a growing season in which squeezing in that last cutting may have not paid, she said.“This is a tough deal, as around two-thirds of the alfalfa is gone now,” she said. “There is going to be even less forage available, as most will only get one or two cuttings with the spring-seeded alfalfa.”The University of Wisconsin published a report evaluating and managing alfalfa stands with winterkill. It can be found at: https://fyi.extension.wisc.edu/….Other areas appear to have escaped widespread alfalfa winterkill. Jared Goplen, a University of Minnesota Extension crops educator from Morris, Minnesota, said the alfalfa situation in western and central Minnesota is generally OK, for the most part.Winterkill appears to be contained to hilltops and valleys. Most fields in the area were covered in snow most of the winter, which would have protected crown roots from the cold. There may have been some ponding in fields for an extended period of time this spring, so some low spots may have been drowned out, he said.“Overall, I would say a majority of the alfalfa fields have some level of winterkill and drown-out areas, but the bulk of fields are growing well,” Goplen said.The situation is similar farther to the west in North Dakota. There wasn’t much winterkill in alfalfa there thanks to plenty of snow that insulated the crop from extremely cold temperatures, according to Marisol Berti, North Dakota State University Extension forage and cover crops specialist.What the cold spring has done is slowed alfalfa growth somewhat. Most of the crop in the state is not even 6 inches tall, which will delay first cutting, probably into mid-June or even later if it stays cold, she said.“That is about two weeks later than normal for first cut alfalfa,” Berti said. “I am sure some farmers have already run out of hay to feed cows, so this delay will affect them.”SLOW-GROWING GRASSFarther to the south and west, forages are also somewhat behind normal in growth.Seth Wilbanks, a livestock and grain farmer from Hughesville, Missouri, said his forages are delayed with the cool conditions seen this spring. He said, last year around this time, he began to cut some grass hay. However, this year with the increased amount of moisture and the shorter crop, he doesn’t think much hay will be harvested anytime soon.Fescue is a popular grass for Missouri forage producers. Normally, by late May, the crop is headed out and about knee high. This year it is considerably shorter, Wilbanks said.Despite concerns about a delayed crop, Wilbanks believes his forage crops could end up yielding close to average — and maybe even above average — thanks to the plentiful moisture. Last year, his central Missouri area suffered through a severe drought, he said.“Once it does get warmer, I think we are going to more tonnage with maybe some issues with quality,” said Wilbanks, who grows corn, soybeans and several different types of forages for his cow-calf herd.Perennial forages in Nebraska will be grazed later than normal, said Bruce Anderson, University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) Extension forage specialist. Yields on cool-season grasses could be lessened some due to the cold spring.“I think these cool-season grasses could really be short this year,” Anderson said.On the plus side, warm-season grasses in the state could see great growth once the temperatures begin to rise. Soil moisture levels are high, so when the heat comes, yields should be fairly decent, he said.Some farmers in Nebraska face a challenging growing season after devastating floods tore through the state in mid-March, destroying fences and depositing large amounts of sand on pastures and hay fields.Anderson said he fielded many calls from livestock and forage producers this spring who face limited or no forage production. In many cases, farmers affected by flooding may turn to annual forages on acres not flooded, he said.The most common cool-season small grain for forage is oats, but others such as cereal rye, triticale, wheat and barley could be planted. Warm-season forages that could be planted include sudangrass, sorghum/sudangrass, forage sorghum, pearl millet and German (foxtail) millet.Other plant species, such as brassicas, can be used for summer annual forages. This would include plants such as forage radishes and turnips.After the floods in mid-April, DTN wrote an article about choosing the right forages for your operation. To read the article, visit: https://www.dtnpf.com/….Russ Quinn can be reached at russ.quinn@dtn.comFollow him on Twitter @RussQuinnDTN(AG/SK)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Kickout Flashing: Often Overlooked and Under Appreciated

first_img This article is only available to GBA Prime Members Start Free Trial Already a member? Log in Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details.center_img We were building a new deck on the back of a house when we had to break for a couple days because of heavy rain. When we returned, the client asked us about a puzzling problem that two roofers had been unable to solve. Occasionally, after a day of rain, the garage floor had a puddle of water that seemed to weep out from the bottom of the back wall where the garage joined the rest of the house. I had a sense after looking in the back of the garage that the leak was at the first piece of step flashing where the garage eave joined the main house wall.I had to remove only two pieces of lap siding where the drip edge on the garage roof met the house wall to see the saturated and decaying plywood sheathing. And the damage only got worse as we removed more clapboards and housewrap further down the wall. When the 25-year-old house was built, the first piece of step flashing was installed against the wall and the housewrap was installed over it, which makes sense for every other piece of step flashing—lap the water-resistive barrier (WRB) over the wall leg of the flashing, shingle style. But the first piece of step flashing in cases where the main body of the wall continues beyond the eave of a lower roof needs to be turned away from the wall, and the WRB has to be sliced so it covers the wall leg of the step flashing and goes behind the turned out leg.We removed the siding on both the back wall of the garage and the adjoining wall of the house. The water damage was more severe and wider lower down on the wall. The insulation was saturated, the outer… last_img read more

Sweet Relief for Musicians in Need

first_img Meet O.A.R. & Receive 2 Tickets to the Concert of Your Choice. 4 Tickets to See Jeff Dunham LIVE & Recieve a Collection of Jeff Dunham Items. It has been just over 20 years since the first Sweet Relief album came out celebrating the music of founder Victoria Williams, and now Sweet Relief III: Pennies From Heaven is available for purchase.Sweet Relief III helps musicians in needThe third compilation, produced by Sheldon Gomberg, features new recordings by various artists including Ben Harper, Jackson Browne, Shelby Lynne, Victoria Williams, She & Him, Ron Sexsmith, Rickie Lee Jones and Joseph Arthur in support of Sweet Relief Musicians Fund. The fund provides financial assistance to all types of career musicians who are struggling while facing illness, disability or age-related problems.Released on Vanguard Records, each of the artists on the album chose songs with a theme of support and assistance such as “If I Needed You” (Joseph Arthur), “How Did You Find Me Here?” (KD Lang), “King of the Road” (She & Him), “Crazy Love” (Ben Harper), “Change is Gonna Come” (Victoria Williams), and “Big Spender” (Sam Phillips) plus many more.“Musicians are always among the first to give their energy and talent to help other people in times of emergency, though they are very often without health insurance themsevles, and need our support when they fall prey to illness and hardship. Sweet Relief has been helping musicians for years, and has helped some whom I am very much indebted to for enriching my life. I am very happy to take part in this CD project, and for the chance to support Sweet Relief’s very soulful work.” – Jackson Browne“Getting a chance to do something that benefits Sweet Relief combined with working with my dear friend Sheldon Comberg is an opportunity I jumped at and something I can’t wait to do again.” – Ben HarperThe compilation is available for purchase on iTunes and Amazon.com.Alongside the release, Charitybuzz is hosting an auction to help raise funds. Current auction items include: Meet Local Natives at The Greek Theatre September 13, Attend Soundcheck & the Exclusive After Show Party with the Band. Meet Gary Allan & Receive 2 Tickets to his Santa Barabra Concert on Spetember 13. Kenny Chesney Autographed Fender Acoustic Guitar,CD & Flag.Also, Upperatus and Prima Donna have partnered up in an effort to raise money for Sweet Relief Musicians Fund by selling limited-edition T-Shirts. $10 of each shirt sold goes directly to Sweet Relief and musicians in need. All shirts are inspired by the band Prima Donna and are affordable, ranging from $23-$24 each. Sweet Relief is thrilled to be a part of such an inspiring project. To purchase shirts, please go to www.upperatus.com and help support a good cause.center_img Meet Travis Tritt & Receive 2 Tickets to the 2013 Concert of Your Choice. Meet Larry the Cable Guy & Recieve 2 Tickets to the Show of Your Choice. Meet Justin Moore & Receive 2 Tickets to the 2013 Concert of Your Choice.last_img read more

Exhibit commemorating Oka crisis on display in Kanesatake

first_imgAPTN National NewsTo this day, the Mohawk uprising of 1990 is an inspiration for Indigenous resistance.It’s also inspired countless works of art.A new exhibition commemorating the 25th anniversary of the Oka crisis has gone on display in Kanesatake.APTN’s Tom Fennario has the story.last_img

Pay TV subscribers in Ireland are swapping their p

first_imgPay TV subscribers in Ireland are swapping their pay TV for free-to-air digital services, according to the Irish Independent newspaper.It says it has seen figures that show that 44,000 homes have moved from pay to free TV in the last two years and that the pay TV churn rate is increasing as analogue switch off progresses.Cable operator UPC has about 470,000 customers in Ireland and BSkyB about 675,000. About 170,000 homes in the country have free-to-air satellite service Freesat and ratings agency TAM Ireland is quoted as saying: “As people are sizing up their options in the build-up to the official analogue switch-off in October this year it is expected to grow further.”last_img read more

Brian Hunt Brian Hunt Yahoos former original con
Brian Hunt Brian Hunt Yahoos former original con

first_imgBrian HuntBrian Hunt, Yahoo’s former original content chief, has joined US prodco Believe and will start a new digital studio focused on making content for digital and OTT platforms.At Believe Entertainment Hunt will be executive VP and head of development. He will lead the new digital division, which has already secured content deals with several online platforms, and will make content for Maker Studios, Mashable, Billboard, The Hollywood Reporter, Time Inc., New York Post, and Reader’s Digest.Hunt will be based in Believe’s New York offices.At Yahoo he was head of creative development for original programming and his credits included Ben Stiller-produced Burning Love and Jack Black’s Ghost Ghirls.He said: “Believe’s business model has always been all-encompassing, including financing, developing, creating, selling, distributing and producing premium content.“I’m excited to help expand the business to leverage the company’s expertise andcapabilities in these areas toward direct partnerships with digital distributors and brands alike.”Believe makes series including shortform animated offering The LeBrons and DJ Tiësto series In the Booth.last_img read more

Spotify rolls out feature that allows users to mute artists they dont

first_imgThere are a variety of reasons people might not like a certain musician. Perhaps they aren’t fans of the sound of an artists songs, or the artist has been involved in controversial activity. Credit: CC0 Public Domain Whatever the reason may be, Spotify users will now be able to mute artists they don’t want to hear from.The popular music streaming service is currently testing out a “don’t play this artist” feature in its latest iOS app, according to a report from The Verge. Once users decide to block the artist, songs from that artist will never play from a library, playlist, chart list or Spotify radio station. However, the block does not apply to songs the artist is featured in.The feature is not available across all Spotify platforms, though. While I was able to successfully use the feature on my iPhone 8 with iOS 12.1.2, I could not find the feature on my 2015 MacBook Air.To access the feature, users should first type in the name of an artist and click on the “…” button on the top right.Then, a page will appear with several options. Users should click on the “Don’t play this artist” button.From there, users will be returned to the artist’s home page and will receive a message that says, “Ok, we won’t play music from this artist…”Users can turn off the feature at any point by returning to the artist’s home page, clicking on the “…” button on the top right corner and selecting the “Remove” button from the subsequent menu.Spotify has experimented previously with blocking certain artists from appearing in playlists. In May 2018, the streaming service made a new policy about hate conduct and content that blocked music by R. Kelly and XXXTentacion from appearing in any of the playlists under Spotify’s name, like the popular “New Music Friday” and “Discover Weekly” playlists it generates and promotes on the home page. This move followed news of two new women accusing R. Kelly of sexual coercion and physical violence a few weeks prior, and of the late XXXTentacion being charged with the aggravated battery of his pregnant former girlfriend.Spotify ultimately reversed its original policy a few weeks later, noting that the “language was vague and left too many elements open to interpretation.”In response to the history of allegations of R. Kelly’s abuse, a “Mute R. Kelly” social media campaign arose in 2017, encouraging boycotts of the rapper’s music and performances. The controversy surrounding R. Kelly has grown since the start of this year, as Lifetime aired its docu-series “Surviving R. Kelly,” which investigated the rapper’s past.Some Spotify users have taken to Twitter to express their satisfaction with being able to mute R. Kelly.It is unclear when Spotify will expand the block feature to more devices.Spotify did not reply to a request for comment from USA TODAY about this new feature. Spotify cuts R. Kelly music from playlists, cites new policy (c)2019 USA TodayDistributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.center_img Citation: Spotify rolls out feature that allows users to mute artists they don’t want to hear (2019, January 25) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-spotify-feature-users-mute-artists.html Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Toyota annual net profit drops by a quarter

first_img Toyota has warned that a no-deal Brexit would affect its plans This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2019 AFP Explore further “But the outlook for the two biggest markets is now murky, while material costs are rising,” said the analyst.”Also, they can’t expect the one-time impact of US tax cuts, which temporarily boosted their profit before. Tough factors outnumbered positive ones,” he told AFP. Rival firm Honda also announced on Wednesday that net profit plunged 42.4 percent to 610 billion yen, citing losses related to reorganisation of the global automobile production in Europe. Sales rose 3.4 percent to 15.9 trillion yen. Toyota cuts full-year profit forecast, warns over Brexit The company forecasts net profit for the year ending March 2020 will grow 9.0 percent to 665 billion yen. The business environment for auto companies has also been clouded by the US-China trade war and continued uncertainty from Brexit. President Toyoda noted: “If you look at the world, the protectionist way of thinking is spreading. Just as natural resource-poor Japan cannot live alone, we, companies, cannot live alone.”Toyota executives have said previously there would be no way to avoid a negative impact in the event of a no-deal Brexit.The firm said its assembly plant in Burnaston in central England, which produces 600 vehicles per day, would be affected.The plant operates under Toyota’s famous “just-in-time” system, holding limited stock on site and relying on flexible imports of millions of component car parts from the EU.”If Britain finally leaves the EU, automakers are likely to accelerate relocation talks. It is natural for them to move to a profitable place,” Takada said.Toyota shares were down some two percent late in the morning but trimmed the losses by more than half at the close after the results and guidance were announced.This was mainly due to the announcement it would buy back shares for up to 300 billion yen, boosting the price.Toyoda said the carmaker’s main challenge was to guard against complacency in a fast-moving sector.”The most dangerous attitude is believing ‘Toyota is going to be okay’,” he said, since the company is faced with cut-throat competition in a rapidly changing world. Toyota booked record sales but its profits were stlil down by a quarter Profits at Japanese car giant Toyota hit the skids despite record sales, the company admitted Wednesday, although it said it expected to accelerate out of trouble in the year ahead. Citation: Toyota annual net profit drops by a quarter (2019, May 8) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-toyota-annual-net-profit-quarter.html The maker of the Camry sedan and Prius hybrid said net profit was down 24.5 percent from its best-ever result the year before, at 1.88 trillion yen ($17 billion) in the year to March 31.Toyota’s bottom line was pushed down by some 294 billion yen in book losses on its investment portfolio.Senior managing officer Masayoshi Shirayanagi blamed “the deterioration of the stock market in the current period” for the investment losses. He added the figures also suffered in comparison with previous year’s 250-billion-yen boost from US tax reform.However, the firm forecast net profit to rise 19.5 percent in the coming year to 2.25 trillion yen.And sales rose 2.9 percent to a record 30.23 trillion yen, leaving an operating profit of 2.47 trillion yen, which was up 2.8 percent year-on-year.Akio Toyoda, the firm’s president, noted it was the first time a Japanese company had ever logged annual sales in excess of 30 trillion yen.The firm expects operating profit for the current year to March 2020 will increase 3.3 percent to 2.55 trillion yen. Sales are forecast to sag 0.7 percent to 30 trillion yen. “Toyota has cruised steadily, compared with its rivals,” said analyst Satoru Takada at TIW, a Tokyo-based research and consulting firm.”The firm largely showed a reasonable performance around the world at a time when the global market is slowing down,” he said.Brexit ‘relocation talks’Takada was less bullish on the outlook of the auto industry.Japanese carmakers have enjoyed a heyday in recent years with the North American market steadily recovering from the financial crisis of the late 2000s and China growing into a mammoth market, he noted.last_img read more