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Heavy rain lashes Odisha, hits normal life in coastal region

first_imgModerate to heavy rain continued to lash several districts of Odisha since Wednesday morning affecting normal life in the southern and coastal regions of the State.Triggered by a well- marked low pressure formed over the Bay of Bengal, heavy rain is likely over more areas of the State over the next three days.As less number of vehicles were seen plying on the roads, people living in slum clusters and low clusters faced difficulties in the urban areas of Berhampur, Puri, Bhubaneswar and Cuttack during the day.The Bhubaneswar Centre of the India Meteorological Department said that heavy to very heavy rain is likely to occur at isolated places over the districts of Koraput, Gajapati, Ganjam and Puri on Thursday. More rain forecastHeavy rain was also likely to hit the districts of Malkangiri, Rayagada, Kalahandi, Kandhamal, Nayagarh, Khurda, Jagatsinghpur, Cuttack, Sundargarh, Kendrapara and Bhadrak, the centre warned. The centre said that heavy to very heavy rain was expected at isolated places over the districts of Sundargarh, Bargarh, Sambalpur, Deogarh and Keonjhar on Friday. The low pressure area, formed over the west-central Bay of Bengal is likely to intensify into a depression by Thursday night, the centre said.last_img read more

Dayton Does Matter
Dayton Does Matter

Most office pools — and a certain billion-dollar bracket contest — insist the NCAA Tournament still has the pleasing, symmetrical, 64-team format: Six rounds, each winnowing the field by half, for a total of 63 games, 63 losers and one winner. Fans, likewise, haven’t gotten over the habit of calling the round of 64, played out over the manic Thursday and Friday of this week, the first round.But the real first round is happening now in Dayton, Ohio, and for the fourth straight year, it really matters. In the so-called play-in games, eight teams will compete on Tuesday and Wednesday for four spots in the round of 64. And two of the winners will have a real chance at a deep tournament run — a better chance than you’d think if you’d glanced at the contenders’ resumes on Selection Sunday. Their first-round — I mean, round-of-64 — opponents could regret having to face them. And you, too, could regret filling out your bracket before the opening-round games are done: North Carolina State and the winner between Iowa and Tennessee could shake up the strong Midwest region.The play-in games aren’t just a gimmick. Like wild-card rounds in the playoffs for the NFL and MLB, they help sort the contenders from the also-rans. Teams that have to play, and win, a contest before facing their next opponent have momentum, an actual phenomenon in college basketball.1As my colleague Benjamin Morris will show in an upcoming article.Most important, play-in games provide vital data about teams’ current strength, which is hard to get from their schedules, littered as they are with non-tournament teams and results from months ago. Winning the play-in game, the most recent and important contest to date against a strong opponent, is a big indicator of a team’s ability today.The baseball playoffs have validated the potency of this combination of momentum and trial by fire. Wild-card teams that have won their first MLB playoff series have won their next series about half the time, despite facing opponents with home-field advantage and, usually, a better record. Winners in the NFL playoff wild-card round, on the other hand, have slightly underperformed expectations, winning three fewer games against rested opponents (out of 124) than would be expected based on their regular-season performance.2This finding is based on NFL playoff data provided by ESPN Stats & Information, combined with Simple Rating System scores from Pro Football Reference, and this formula for converting SRS into win probability (assuming home-field advantage is worth 2.5 points). Why are the NFL playoffs so different from baseball and basketball? Two untested hypotheses: 1) The extra week of rest matters more because the sport is so physically demanding; and 2) SRS understates the gap in quality between bye teams and wild-card winners because many top teams rest starters after clinching byes, artificially deflating their ratings. Also notable: More recently, the NFL playoffs have looked a lot more like MLB’s. Over the last nine postseasons, wild-card winners have won their next game against bye teams 15 times, compared to an expected total of 12 wins.Sorting contenders from also-rans is particularly helpful in college basketball, a sport that’s particularly hard to predict from regular-season results. Each team has played fewer than 10 percent of other Division I teams. Top teams come from more conferences in college basketball than in football, making each team’s average conference game less meaningful as a postseason preview. Many regular-season starting lineups are a mix of new players and players who have never played with them, meaning November results may predict little about March results.From 2001, when the play-in concept was introduced, through 2011, this sorting mechanism didn’t matter much, because the single game decided which team would offer itself up for ritual sacrifice in the next round. In those days, play-in games pitted two would-be No. 16 seeds against each other for a chance at a game against a No. 1 seed. Those games aren’t unwinnable, yet they were never won.Those 10 underdogs did slightly better than expected in the round of 64. Their Simple Rating System3Simple Rating System is, as its name suggests, a basic way of evaluating teams based on their schedule strength and margin of victory. score heading into the tournament, along with the SRS of their top-seeded round-of-64 opponents, suggested they should have lost those games by an average of 29 points. Instead, they lost by an average of 27 points — a layup better per blowout.Since 2011, though, the play-in round has expanded to four games, with four of the teams competing to be seeded from 11th to 14th. These teams have a lot more to play for: They aren’t going to face a top-two seed in their next game, so they have a fighting chance of winning.The NCAA’s move was both innovative and retrospective: The 1983 and 1984 tournaments — with field sizes of 52 and 53 teams, respectively — also had play-in games, then called an opening round. Winners advanced to the first round, which was then also a kind of preliminary round of its own, pitting outsider teams against each other for a chance to play the top 16 teams, which each got two byes.The back-to-the-future tournament restructuring of 2011 immediately paid dividends. Virginia Commonwealth beat the University of Southern California for an 11 seed in the Southwest region, where VCU was a 10-point underdog to Georgetown, according to pre-tournament SRS. Instead, VCU crushed Georgetown by 18 points. And that was no fluke — the Rams then routed third seed Purdue by 18 and went on to the Final Four.VCU’s run is an outlier; you’d want good odds to bet on any play-in winner reaching this year’s Final Four in Arlington, Texas. But it’s also consistent with the historical data. Since 1980,4As far back as our data set goes 61 percent of 109 teams that had to win an opening or first-round game exceeded SRS expectations in their next game, against an opponent with a bye. The data set spans the play-in games of the past 13 tournaments, plus the opening rounds and first rounds in the early 1980s, when more teams got at least one bye. And the average team outperformed its rating relative to its opponent by two points. An extra layup doesn’t matter in a blowout, but it could swing a close 5-12 matchup.The sample size here is too small to be definitive: The standard deviation of teams’ performance relative to expectations is almost 10 points. But other findings corroborate this one. For instance, the analysis so far hasn’t accounted for how play-in teams that won their next game did later on in the tournament. But many went on to make deep tournament runs. VCU was the seventh opening-round winner to get to the Final Four. The 1980 Final Four featured three teams that had to play their way into the main, 32-team bracket. And Jim Valvano’s North Carolina State championship team of 1983 was a No. 6 seed that didn’t get a first-round bye.Seven semifinalist berths is a remarkable yield from this group of teams. Treat the 32 opening-round winners who won their next game as you would any other team in that round of the tournament, and you’d expect seven of them to reach the Final Four. And yet these were no ordinary teams. Each was, after all, flawed — it was in the opening-round game for a reason. None was seeded in the top four in its region.Don’t take this as advice to write in any of this week’s play-in winners for a trip to Arlington. The most important factor in predicting winners will remain teams’ relative strength through the season. But if you’re looking for an edge in a bracket contest, you could do worse than backing a play-in winner. And if you’re a fan of a team slotted to play one, hope your team’s coaching staff has been keeping a close eye on Dayton.CORRECTION (March 19, 11:00 a.m.): An earlier version of this article said four teams would match up in two play-in games. Eight teams will play four play-in games this week in Dayton. read more

Mens Hockey No 5 Ohio State downs Mercyhurst to begin second half

Ohio State men’s hockey players celebrate after a goal in the second period of the game against UMass on Oct. 19. Ohio State fell 6-3. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorFollowing Ohio State’s 27-day break, the Buckeyes returned to action with a sweep of the Mercyhurst Lakers by scores of 3-1 and 5-4.Ohio State (11-4-3, 4-2-2-2 Big Ten) dominated the Lakers (8-10-2, 6-5-1 Atlantic Hockey) on special teams and limited Mercyhurst’s shots throughout the series to secure the pair of wins.Game 1Ohio State won the first game of the series against Mercyhurst 3-1 including the first goal of the season by Ohio State junior defenseman Matt Miller. The teams failed to find the net in the first period despite a combined 25 shots between the two squads. Mercyhurst had an opportunity to score on the power play in the first 20 minutes, but the special teams of the Buckeyes held strong and killed the penalty. Scoring opened up midway through the second period as sophomore forward Austin Pooley scored for the second time this season. Pooley was assisted by senior forward Brendon Kearney and junior forward Sam McCormick. The goal came shortly after a failed power play attempt by the Buckeyes after Mercyhurst was called for having too many players on the ice. Overall, Ohio State converted on two of its five power play opportunities on the night and killed all six penalties it faced.Neither squad scored for the remainder of the period, and the score remained 1-0 in favor of the Buckeyes until Miller scored to increase the Buckeyes’ lead. Miller found the net during a five-on-three power play after two Lakers picked up penalties within a minute of each other. Senior forwards Dakota Joshua and Mason Jobst assisted on the goal.Mercyhurst scored with under a minute remaining in the game with an empty net to make it a one-score game, but the Buckeyes’ defense held strong and even added an additional empty net goal by Jobst with two seconds remaining to make the final 3-1. Jobst was assisted by Kearney, his second assist of the game. Redshirt senior goaltender Sean Romeo allowed one goal on 20 shots faced, with the one goal coming during a six-on-five. Through his first nine games he started this season, Romeo has allowed 18 goals and is averaging 2.19 goals allowed per game in addition to a .916 save percentage.Game 2In more of a high-scoring affair, Ohio State finished the sweep of the Lakers, winning 5-4 on a game-winning goal by senior defenseman Sasha Larocque.Mercyhurst took their first lead of the series midway through the first period, an even-strength goal by freshman forward Geoff Kitt. The Buckeyes responded just over four minutes later with a goal by junior forward Ronnie Hein, assisted by Larocque and junior forward Tanner Laczynski, his 10th of the season.The Buckeyes followed up the score with a power play goal by senior forward Freddy Gerard, his sixth goal of the season. Gerard was assisted by Hein and Laczynski, his 11th assist of the season.Saturday’s game was the 100th game played by Gerard for Ohio State. Through Saturday’s game, he has scored 18 goals, 26 assists and 44 points during his career at Ohio State.In the second period, Mercyhurst scored two unanswered goals to take the lead over Ohio State, one coming on the power play and the other at even strength just over three minutes in. Junior forward Carson Meyer responded just 20 seconds later to tie the game 3-3, assisted by Joshua and senior forward John Wiitala.With six minutes left in the second period, Mercyhurst found the net to once again take the lead, but less than four minutes later, Meyer once again scored to tie the game. With his two goals against Mercyhurst, Meyer now sits at six goals on the year, tied for No. 2 on the team with Hein. Ohio State scored on three of its four attempts on the power play Saturday night and allowed the Lakers to convert on one of their three attempts. Overall, the Buckeyes were three for nine in the series and killed all but one of the Laker’s nine tries with the man advantage.The tie was eventually broken by Larocque midway through the third period with his second goal of the season to give Ohio State the 5-4 lead, and from there the Buckeyes ran with the lead, limiting Mercyhurst to only seven shot attempts in the third period. Freshman forward Gustaf Westlund assisted on the goal, his 11th of the season.The five goals by the Buckeyes were tied for the most they’ve scored this season, also finding the net five times against Penn State on Nov. 24. The Buckeyes outshot the Lakers 94-47 in the series.Sophomore forward Tommy Nappier allowed four goals on 26 shots. So far this season, he has allowed 16 goals and has a .941 save percentage.The Buckeyes will stay at home to take on Michigan State on Jan. 4 and 5. The puck drops on Friday at 7 p.m. and Saturday at 8 p.m. read more

Hawaii Volcano Erupts From Summit Sends Huge Plume Into Sky
Hawaii Volcano Erupts From Summit Sends Huge Plume Into Sky

first_imgOfficials have said they didn’t expect the explosion to be deadly as long as people remained out of the closed national park. The explosion came after two weeks of volcanic activity and the opening of more than a dozen fissures east of the crater that spewed lava into neighborhoods, said Mike Poland, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享HONOLULU (AP) – Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano erupted from its summit before dawn Thursday, shooting a dusty plume of ash about 30,000 feet (9,100 meters) into the sky. Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. It’s one of five volcanoes that comprise the Big Island of Hawaii, and the only one currently erupting. Kilauea is one of the world’s most active volcanoes. An eruption in 1924 killed one person and sent rocks, ash and dust into the air for 17 days. Kilauea volcano has been erupting continuously since 1983.center_img The lava destroyed has destroyed at least 26 homes and 10 other structures. Scientists predicted it would mostly release trapped steam from flash-heated groundwater released as though it was a kitchen pressure cooker. The crater sits within Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, which has been closed since May 11 in preparation for an eruption. Communities a mile or two away may be showered by pea-size fragments or dusted with nontoxic ash, they said. Scientists warned on May 9 that a drop in the lava lake at the summit might create conditions for an explosion that could fling ash and boulders the size of refrigerators into the air.last_img read more

Back From The Dead

first_imgThe duo had become adept at repositionings, having done the same thing with Maine Home & Design which had been struggling financially after producing only two issues when they acquired it in 2006. “When we were publishing Maine Home & Design we were getting pulled into a lifestyle approach. There was a vacuum in Maine for that kind of coverage,” says Thomas. “Then Port City Life became available.”With the acquisition of Port City Life, the lifestyle model being incubated in Maine Home & Design was given full treatment. But despite the high production quality, Thomas and Kelley are playing a nuanced numbers game. When they acquired the magazine, circulation was 21,000, distributed at about 140 newsstands. Now, the magazine is up to 30,000 circ. and available on about 1,000 newsstands—a level the team is comfortable with. “We don’t believe in big circulation, that’s not appealing to us,” says Thomas. “We want to do a great job with 30,000 to 40,000 readers. It helps us stay focused on a quality product.”So far the costlier production model, tempered with prudent circ. growth, has paid off. Ad pages and revenue have each grown 15 percent, says Thomas.Electronic Gaming MonthlyTightening Print and Digital IntegrationIn early 2009, Ziff Davis Media shuttered Electronic Gaming Monthly (EGM) as part of the company’s bid to become a digital-only operation and focus on its PCMagazine brand platform. Five months later, Steve Harris, who originally founded EGM, acquired the brand’s assets. After pushing EGM’s relaunch date from December to March due to last-minute tweaking to EGM’s digital counterpart EGMi, Harris has presented a title that simultaneously relies on its previous strengths while attempting to leverage a tighter digital integration with print.EGMi, a weekly digital companion edition to EGM, includes print content as well as original and multimedia content only available in the digital version. Subscribers can choose between a 12-issue print subscription and 52 digital issues for $24.99 or six print issues and 26 digital issues for $14.99. Newsstand editions include a special code that can “upgrade” reader access to the digital version, which is currently distributed to 500,000 readers.Outside of a redesign so that the Web site, digital edition and print magazine all share common elements, much of EGM remains in place, says Harris. “We’re not going in and changing things simply to change them, though we are devoting more attention to how the print product can integrate with our new digital platform and how the two media can compliment each other.”The new EGM was marketed heavily through the brand’s Twitter and Facebook accounts, says Harris. Now, however, he is using the print/digital integration to maximize value. “You’re going to see the integration between digital and print and the way our premium version of EGMi (which features video, programming, and exclusive downloads you can only get if you purchase the print magazine) will become more robust and ultimately incentivize readers to purchase the magazine in a way that is more effective than just lowering the cover price or discounting the subscription.”Harris says there is still potential for the brand to flirt with mass-market distribution. “It was a category leader for much of its run, yet I don’t believe it ever broke 700,000 circ. We’re focusing on additional efforts on digital where, frankly, I’m confident we’ll reach a seven-figure readership.”East West MagazineA relaunch that didn’t quite make it, and lessons learned.Anita Malik founded and launched East West first as an online-only brand, then a bimonthly magazine targeting Asian Americans that focused on the intersection of Eastern and Western cultures, in 2003. By April 2008 the title ran out of money and shut down. “It is the tale of a small, bare bones company that has grown too fast,” Malik wrote in a letter posted on the magazine’s Web site at the time. “Our resources have been taxed and this labor of love has become larger than our small staff.”Just over a year later, Malik secured between $150,000 and $200,000 in new investment capital and relaunched the brand. Malik credited her small staff and low overhead as an operational advantage, but, as she soon learned, she wasn’t prepared for just how bad the marketing landscape had become. And, she now admits, relaunching a magazine is not simply picking up where you left off.Malik entered into the relaunch thinking her market had benefited from an advertising renaissance. “The environment had changed, I thought for the better,” she says. “People were just starting to embrace multicultural marketing and were starting to put aside budgets for that. But now, that’s the last thing on their minds.” Nevertheless, in June 2009 Malik was riding a wave of enthusiasm for the relaunch. “For us it was about focusing on how the market is underserved and how we were the one magazine. We restructured, we were back and we refocused on the edit.”Malik quickly learned that her previously core markets, like the auto industry, had simply evaporated and found herself back at square one with her advertising base. “I had to restructure who we were even targeting,” she says. “They might have heard of us, but not at the same level as the former advertisers.”At the same time, Malik was running a “cautious” business plan that focused on cutting costs out of production. Meanwhile, she batted down counsel to “go Web-only” and add in other revenue-generating schemes like a dating site. “The audience doesn’t want that,” says Malik. “I know everybody thinks you need that, but for me it didn’t work for what our product was about.”Yet with the cautious pace and a suddenly unresponsive advertising base, Malik quickly realized her comeback was getting severely pinched. Things were happening too slowly. The relaunch investment, she figured, could last her about three issues. “We could do three issues and not make a dime and be OK,” she says. “I felt that three issues in and we’d be fine. We didn’t need a year.”Yet the hurdles were stacking up. Malik couldn’t get the magazine back into all the bookstores it had been in—which was at least a couple stores in every state.While between 40 and 60 percent of the magazine’s original circulation came back into the fold, Malik got two issues deep into her relaunch and pulled the plug. “Everything came more gradually. I wanted to step back into where we left off and you can’t do that. Maybe with a bigger staff that’s possible. There’s so much out there for readers. They may say they miss you, but you don’t know what that means until you come back and see whether they’ll put their dollars there.” Reintroducing a magazine, whether after a closure or relaunching under a new brand and editorial direction, is a tall order these days. Advertising expenditures are still in flux and cost control is the name of the game—a tough formula for a startup environment for magazines. Yet it’s often the case that a brand can not only survive under a new corporate structure, but thrive. Those that don’t have lessons to share, too. Here, we talk with three publishers who have been down the relaunch road before—two of whom are currently growing recently acquired brands and one who brought her magazine back from the dead once, only to finally shutter it for good.Maine MagazineReinvesting in Editorial, Materials and DistributionBy the time Kevin Thomas, publisher of regional magazine Maine Home & Design, acquired Port City Life in early 2009, the magazine had already begun cutbacks, dropping from a 10-time frequency to bimonthly. Nevertheless, Thomas, along with partner and editor-in-chief Susan Grisanti Kelley, saw an opportunity to plow capital back into the magazine—expanding its editorial coverage from the Portland region to statewide, restoring its frequency and dramatically boosting its distribution and production quality. Maine emerged from a relaunch five months after it was acquired.“We wanted to produce a quality publication,” says Thomas. “A lot of our competitors were changing trim sizes and going with cheaper stock. We went with the opposite approach.”last_img read more

October 17 2012Different Skies the annual festiv

first_imgOctober 17, 2012Different Skies, the annual festival of electronic and experimental music returned to the Colly Soleri Music Center for its 10th year. Different Skies 2012 participants [from left]John Krikawa: keyboards, Russel Foster: drums and guitar, Otso Pakarinen: keyboards and guitar, Allan Goodman: guitar, keybords and audio mix, Mike Medley in the chair: keyboards, aebea & iPad, Dave Fulton: keyboards, Giles Reaves: keyboards and drums, and Tim Walters: bass and manta. Some have attended the week-long Different Skies Music Festival since its beginning in 2003.[photo by Sue Kirsch]It was an intense week for the group. After enduring several days of strong rains and hail that interrupted rehearsals and flooded the floor of the stage, Different Skies nevertheless gave a terrific performance on Saturday evening, October 13.[photo by Jeremy Schevling]A good-size crowd wrapped in coats and blankets in response to a chilly Saturday night, enjoyed Different Skies’ program of brand-new compositions. Within the week the musicians wrote the music, practiced each others compositions in group and put together a program of distinctly personal pieces. All this with highly skilled musicians![photo by Jeremy Schevling]Video images, including a beautiful collection of time-lapse photography taken by Giles Reaves during the week at Arcosanti, were projected on a screen behind the musicians. [photo by Jeremy Schevling]last_img read more

In the US there was 25 growth in video views and
In the US there was 25 growth in video views and

first_imgIn the US there was 25% growth in video views and 32% growth in ad views year-on-year in the second quarter, according to FreeWheel’s Q2 2015 Video Monetisation Report.The US company, which provides end-to-end video technology to companies including ABC, AOL, DirecTV, ESPN, Fox, BSkyB, and Turner Broadcasting System, claimed that the findings of its report show that “the new primetime is anytime.”Long-form and live content were the main drivers, growing 26% and 146% year-over-year respectively, while 38%% of ad views came from devices other than desktop and laptop computers, with smartphones and over-the-top (OTT) devices – like Roku, Apple TV and Chromecast streaming devices, and games consoles and smart TVs – leading that growth, according to the report.“Smartphones now account for greater than one in five video ad views reflecting triple digit growth over the last two quarters,” said FreeWheel. “Consumption of premium video across day parts does not show a dominating skew towards any particular hour, as viewers create their own custom primetimes.”“MVPD apps have become increasingly popular venues for syndication, accounting for 4.5% of all programmer ad views with 200% growth,” said the report.last_img read more

Sports broadcaster Eleven Sports has struck a deal
Sports broadcaster Eleven Sports has struck a deal

first_imgSports broadcaster Eleven Sports has struck a deal with Portuguese cable operator Nowo to debut its channels in the Portuguese market.Eleven’s deal with Nowo follows its announcement that it would launch in the country following its acquisition of rights to all matches from the Champions League and Spain’s La Liga for the Portuguese market.Eleven said it would look to increase its rights portfolio going forward.Eleven’s Champions League deal includes 138 matches per season, from the final qualifying round and group stages to the final. It also includes the UEFA Super Cup – the annual tie between the winners of the UEFA Champions League and the UEFA Europa League.The agreement with La Liga includes every match from Spain’s top tier of football.Eleven already has rights to La Liga in the UK, Poland, Belgium and Luxembourg.“We’re delighted to partner with Nowo to serve Portuguese football fans with our award-winning style of fan-first coverage.” said Danny Menken, group managing director, Eleven Sports.“Portugal is one of the most passionate football countries in the world. We know there is a significant hunger for world class football and working with Nowo will help us to make our premium action accessible for dedicated fans across the country.”Miguel Venâncio, CEO of Nowo, said: “This is a very important step that asserts Nowo as a decisive player in the sports market, allowing all Portuguese fans to access great sports content. The partnership follows our strategy to increase our penetration in the market, delivering new ways to access to premium content.”Nowo – formerly known as Cabovisão, has a share of around 5% of the Portuguese TV market.The rights secured by Eleven for its Portuguese launch are currently held by Sport TV, jointly owned by Olivedesportos, pay TV operator NOS, Altice Portugal/Meo and Vodafone Portugal, which also holds the rights to Portugal’s Liga NOS.Portugal’s leading operators – including Cabovisão as well as the Sport TV shareholders – signed a deal two years ago that was designed to ensure reciprocity in sports rights across their platforms.last_img read more