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10 months agoSalihamidzic in talks with Hudson-Odoi family about Bayern Munich move

first_imgSalihamidzic in talks with Hudson-Odoi family about Bayern Munich moveby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBayern Munich chief Hasan Salihamidzic has held talks with Chelsea attacker Callum Hudson-Odoi about a move to Germany next month.Bayern have upped their bid from €15m to €20m in the last 24 hours after being encouraged in talks with the player’s camp.BILD says Salihamidzic has spoken with Hudson-Odoi’s family about a career plan they have mapped out for the teenager.The 18 year-old is tied to Chelsea until 2020 and leaning towards leaving in January.For his part, Blues manager Maurizio Sarri says: “He’s still a very young player, we’ll have to wait a bit. But in the future he will be a very, very strong player, I’m sure of that.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

America First shockandawe hits Bombardier Whats next in tariff fight

first_imgWASHINGTON – There’s no question: The shock-and-awe approach to trade disputes is having an impact in the early days of the Trump administration, with the stunner of a 219-per-cent duty on Bombardier just the latest example of the new tariff-happy, America First climate in Washington.Donald Trump’s commerce secretary even bragged about it when announcing a first duty late Tuesday. In a statement, Wilbur Ross touted a 48 per cent increase from last year in anti-dumping and countervailing cases initiated by the U.S. Department of Commerce.That’s on the heels of a study that found a 26 per cent spike in U.S. trade actions against G20 partners in the first half of this year from the same period in 2016, according to the Center for Economic Policy Research’s Global Trade Alert.Just ask Canadian softwood-lumber producers. They’ve been tasting that punitive medicine for months.The latest decision rewarded Boeing with duties practically three times higher than the U.S. aerospace giant asked for, as it argued that Bombardier’s subsidies from Canadian taxpayers gave it an unfair entry into the U.S. market.Ross appeared to agree: ”The U.S. values its relationships with Canada, but even our closest allies must play by the rules.”It’s only the beginning.As a matter of fact, trade experts consulted late Monday agreed on two things: There’s time to fight back, and friendlier battlefields to fight on. They urged the Canadian government to choose its battles wisely, and not needlessly escalate the dispute.One trade-policy analyst at Washington’s free-market Cato Institute criticized the U.S. department that handled the initial decision.He said later arbiters won’t likely be as hostile.The raison d’etre of the Department of Commerce’s enforcement unit is to protect U.S. companies, said Dan Ikenson — it even offers counselling services to help U.S. companies prepare their complaint.It sides with American petitioners more than 90 per cent of the time and will certainly clobber Bombardier again with a new anti-dumping duty as early as next week, he said.”The Commerce Department is a pit bull,” Ikenson said.”They see it as a sign of success (when they impose a duty)… They’re political.”It’s different in other forums, he added.The case later heads back to the U.S. International Trade Commission, which must determine whether Boeing has actually suffered and, if not, could cancel the duties. Historical stats show a perfectly even track record: 39 per cent affirmative decisions, 39 negative, with 22 per cent of cases withdrawn.And he’s urging the Canadians to try their luck in a third venue: the U.S. domestic court system’s Court of International Trade. He said that court is actually friendlier to foreigners, siding with them in a majority of cases.He said that’s a smarter route than a fourth venue: NAFTA’s Chapter 19 dispute process. He said U.S. policy-makers might find Chapter 19 easier to ignore, given that the current Trump administration hates it, wants to get rid of it in the new NAFTA, and might relish the opportunity to pick a fight challenging its authority.”I’m convinced the courts will find mischief (from Boeing),” he said.”I can’t understand their claim of injury… They don’t even make these damned planes (Bombardier makes).”He compared Boeing’s complaint to a snow-plow salesman suing a bicycle-maker. He also noted the irony of Boeing suing anyone over government assistance, since it’s the No. 1 recipient of government support through the U.S. Export-Import Bank — referred to jokingly in Washington as “the Bank of Boeing.””Boeing is very much at the trough,” he said.Duties are still months away.That’s because the order of up to 125 Bombardier CS100s doesn’t start heading to Delta before the spring. That makes the dispute different from softwood, where producers got whacked immediately on log exports.That will buy both sides more time, said Canada-U.S. trade lawyer Mark Warner.”Everybody’s going to get worked up over this,” said Warner, of MAAW Law in Toronto. ”But calm down, everybody. There’s a ways to go.”It would be a mistake for the Canadian government to make rash decisions in two specific areas, Warner said: the purchase of Boeing Super Hornet fighter jets, and the Chapter 19 discussion in NAFTA negotiations.Canada, he said, should make those other decisions on their merits — and not muck up already-sensitive processes like military purchases and NAFTA.”Keep this out of NAFTA,” he said. ”Have a conversation about Chapter 19 that’s cold-blooded.”The same advice came from a Washington aviation consultant who said he thinks Boeing messed up. Richard Aboulafia said the giant risks hurting itself in a number of global partnerships, over a tiny plane purchase.But he thinks Canada would be compounding the mistake by dragging the issue into the NAFTA discussion: ”Will it? Yeah, you know it might,” he said. ”Should it? Oh God, no. Look this is a very discrete case best decided by experts.”last_img read more

OPEC countries to pump more oil to contain price increase

first_imgWhile OPEC’s largest producer, Saudi Arabia, is seen to be open to higher production, Iran has been hesitant because of its trouble to increase output and tensions with the U.S. President Donald Trump has been calling publicly for the cartel to help lower prices.The production limits by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and Russia since 2016 have helped increase oil prices, with the benchmark U.S. crude contract hitting its highest level in more than three years in May. Some analysts note that while Trump has blamed OPEC, his policies have also helped increase the cost of oil by, for example, limiting exports from Iran.Some analysts believe that Saudi Arabia needs a Brent price closer to $90 a barrel to cover its domestic spending but is feeling pressure from the United States to head off rising prices by boosting output. Russia may be happy to pump more oil and settle for prices in the $60s, according to Tamar Essner, chief energy analyst for Nasdaq.There are other considerations than dollars and rubles. How that translates into effective production increases is uncertain, as some OPEC countries cannot easily ramp up production. Iran, for example, has been hit by U.S. sanctions that hinder its energy exports. Venezuela’s production has dropped amid domestic political instability.The price of oil jumped after the announcement, with the international benchmark, Brent, gaining $1.61 to $74.66 a barrel.Al-Mazrouei noted that the decision “is challenging for those countries that are struggling with keeping their level of production.” However, he indicated that some countries could pick up production if others lag.“We will deal with it collectively,” he said.Friday’s decision means OPEC will observe the production level it agreed on in late 2016, when it cut output by 1.2 million barrels a day. In practice, its combined output was even less due to production problems. That has since then helped push up the price of oil by almost 50 percent.Non-OPEC countries like Russia had agreed in 2016 to participate in OPEC’s effort to raise prices, cutting 600,000 barrels a day of their own production. They will discuss with OPEC on Saturday on whether to increase their own production. Daniel Yergin, the vice chairman of research firm IHS Markit and author of several books on the energy industry, says geopolitical factors are a big element in the oil production talks.Yergin said Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates support the current, tougher U.S. policy toward Iran, Saudi Arabia’s rival for influence in the region. So they will want to support Trump’s call for higher production and lower prices. Iran will struggle to increase production, meaning it could lose market share and revenue.By Kiyoko Metzler And Geir MoulsonTHE ASSOCIATED PRESScenter_img VIENNA, AUSTRIA – The OPEC oil countries agreed Friday to increase their combined production by almost 1 million barrels a day, though questions remain over some members’ ability to do so amid domestic trouble and sanctions.After a meeting in Vienna, Emirati Energy Minister Suhail al-Mazrouei said the cartel decided to fully comply with its existing production ceiling.Because the group had been producing below that level, that effectively means an increase in production. The minister said that amounts to “a little bit less than 1 million barrels.”last_img read more

The North Matters touring Northeastern BC in support of natural resources

first_img“We need to do something to get the Minister of Finances’, Bill Morneau’s attention on these steel tariffs because these tariffs are killing us… In the meantime, we need to get this project going to create opportunities for everyone, from the upstream to the downstream, so we can make this project happen from Fort Nelson, Fort St. John, Dawson Creek, and down to Kitimat. A lot of opportunities are at stake here. We ended up getting 1,500 letters personally signed by people in the community. We put them into a Xerox box and I just mailed them to Bill Morneau’s office.”According to Johnston, his group is taking a proactive and positive approach when it comes to educating people on the need for natural resources and is currently working to build a network with communities to further gain support.In helping with educating and gaining support, the group will be presenting Independent Investigative Researcher Vivian Krause in Taylor on June 14.More information can be found on The North Matters’ Facebook page. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – A grassroots natural resource support group, The North Matters, is currently touring Northeastern B.C.Group Founder, David Johnston, says the group formed a year-and-a-half-ago and aims to work hard to help end the divisiveness that communities are facing over natural resource developments.Johnston says he, along with many supporters, are looking to get Bill Morneau’s, the Minister of Finances’, attention in removing steel tariffs in order to get the LNG project underway as soon as possible. Johnston has sent a petition of letters to the Minister in order to apply pressure to the situation.last_img read more

Dayton Does Matter
Dayton Does Matter

Most office pools — and a certain billion-dollar bracket contest — insist the NCAA Tournament still has the pleasing, symmetrical, 64-team format: Six rounds, each winnowing the field by half, for a total of 63 games, 63 losers and one winner. Fans, likewise, haven’t gotten over the habit of calling the round of 64, played out over the manic Thursday and Friday of this week, the first round.But the real first round is happening now in Dayton, Ohio, and for the fourth straight year, it really matters. In the so-called play-in games, eight teams will compete on Tuesday and Wednesday for four spots in the round of 64. And two of the winners will have a real chance at a deep tournament run — a better chance than you’d think if you’d glanced at the contenders’ resumes on Selection Sunday. Their first-round — I mean, round-of-64 — opponents could regret having to face them. And you, too, could regret filling out your bracket before the opening-round games are done: North Carolina State and the winner between Iowa and Tennessee could shake up the strong Midwest region.The play-in games aren’t just a gimmick. Like wild-card rounds in the playoffs for the NFL and MLB, they help sort the contenders from the also-rans. Teams that have to play, and win, a contest before facing their next opponent have momentum, an actual phenomenon in college basketball.1As my colleague Benjamin Morris will show in an upcoming article.Most important, play-in games provide vital data about teams’ current strength, which is hard to get from their schedules, littered as they are with non-tournament teams and results from months ago. Winning the play-in game, the most recent and important contest to date against a strong opponent, is a big indicator of a team’s ability today.The baseball playoffs have validated the potency of this combination of momentum and trial by fire. Wild-card teams that have won their first MLB playoff series have won their next series about half the time, despite facing opponents with home-field advantage and, usually, a better record. Winners in the NFL playoff wild-card round, on the other hand, have slightly underperformed expectations, winning three fewer games against rested opponents (out of 124) than would be expected based on their regular-season performance.2This finding is based on NFL playoff data provided by ESPN Stats & Information, combined with Simple Rating System scores from Pro Football Reference, and this formula for converting SRS into win probability (assuming home-field advantage is worth 2.5 points). Why are the NFL playoffs so different from baseball and basketball? Two untested hypotheses: 1) The extra week of rest matters more because the sport is so physically demanding; and 2) SRS understates the gap in quality between bye teams and wild-card winners because many top teams rest starters after clinching byes, artificially deflating their ratings. Also notable: More recently, the NFL playoffs have looked a lot more like MLB’s. Over the last nine postseasons, wild-card winners have won their next game against bye teams 15 times, compared to an expected total of 12 wins.Sorting contenders from also-rans is particularly helpful in college basketball, a sport that’s particularly hard to predict from regular-season results. Each team has played fewer than 10 percent of other Division I teams. Top teams come from more conferences in college basketball than in football, making each team’s average conference game less meaningful as a postseason preview. Many regular-season starting lineups are a mix of new players and players who have never played with them, meaning November results may predict little about March results.From 2001, when the play-in concept was introduced, through 2011, this sorting mechanism didn’t matter much, because the single game decided which team would offer itself up for ritual sacrifice in the next round. In those days, play-in games pitted two would-be No. 16 seeds against each other for a chance at a game against a No. 1 seed. Those games aren’t unwinnable, yet they were never won.Those 10 underdogs did slightly better than expected in the round of 64. Their Simple Rating System3Simple Rating System is, as its name suggests, a basic way of evaluating teams based on their schedule strength and margin of victory. score heading into the tournament, along with the SRS of their top-seeded round-of-64 opponents, suggested they should have lost those games by an average of 29 points. Instead, they lost by an average of 27 points — a layup better per blowout.Since 2011, though, the play-in round has expanded to four games, with four of the teams competing to be seeded from 11th to 14th. These teams have a lot more to play for: They aren’t going to face a top-two seed in their next game, so they have a fighting chance of winning.The NCAA’s move was both innovative and retrospective: The 1983 and 1984 tournaments — with field sizes of 52 and 53 teams, respectively — also had play-in games, then called an opening round. Winners advanced to the first round, which was then also a kind of preliminary round of its own, pitting outsider teams against each other for a chance to play the top 16 teams, which each got two byes.The back-to-the-future tournament restructuring of 2011 immediately paid dividends. Virginia Commonwealth beat the University of Southern California for an 11 seed in the Southwest region, where VCU was a 10-point underdog to Georgetown, according to pre-tournament SRS. Instead, VCU crushed Georgetown by 18 points. And that was no fluke — the Rams then routed third seed Purdue by 18 and went on to the Final Four.VCU’s run is an outlier; you’d want good odds to bet on any play-in winner reaching this year’s Final Four in Arlington, Texas. But it’s also consistent with the historical data. Since 1980,4As far back as our data set goes 61 percent of 109 teams that had to win an opening or first-round game exceeded SRS expectations in their next game, against an opponent with a bye. The data set spans the play-in games of the past 13 tournaments, plus the opening rounds and first rounds in the early 1980s, when more teams got at least one bye. And the average team outperformed its rating relative to its opponent by two points. An extra layup doesn’t matter in a blowout, but it could swing a close 5-12 matchup.The sample size here is too small to be definitive: The standard deviation of teams’ performance relative to expectations is almost 10 points. But other findings corroborate this one. For instance, the analysis so far hasn’t accounted for how play-in teams that won their next game did later on in the tournament. But many went on to make deep tournament runs. VCU was the seventh opening-round winner to get to the Final Four. The 1980 Final Four featured three teams that had to play their way into the main, 32-team bracket. And Jim Valvano’s North Carolina State championship team of 1983 was a No. 6 seed that didn’t get a first-round bye.Seven semifinalist berths is a remarkable yield from this group of teams. Treat the 32 opening-round winners who won their next game as you would any other team in that round of the tournament, and you’d expect seven of them to reach the Final Four. And yet these were no ordinary teams. Each was, after all, flawed — it was in the opening-round game for a reason. None was seeded in the top four in its region.Don’t take this as advice to write in any of this week’s play-in winners for a trip to Arlington. The most important factor in predicting winners will remain teams’ relative strength through the season. But if you’re looking for an edge in a bracket contest, you could do worse than backing a play-in winner. And if you’re a fan of a team slotted to play one, hope your team’s coaching staff has been keeping a close eye on Dayton.CORRECTION (March 19, 11:00 a.m.): An earlier version of this article said four teams would match up in two play-in games. Eight teams will play four play-in games this week in Dayton. read more

Ohio State womens volleyball sweeps Rutgers in regularseason finale

Members of the OSU women’s volleyball team during a game against Nebraska on Oct. 3 at St. John Arena. OSU won 3-2. Credit: Ed Momot / For The LanternThe Ohio State women’s volleyball team capped off its regular season with a dominating effort on Saturday, steamrolling Rutgers on senior night in St. John Arena.It took only three sets (26-24, 25-7, 25-12) and 74 minutes for the No. 16 team to take down the Scarlet Knights (4-28, 1-19), as the Buckeyes led for nearly the entire match.OSU finished the regular season with an overall record of 23-9 and placed sixth in the Big Ten with a 12-8 mark.Fittingly, senior outside hitter Elizabeth Campbell led all players with 14 kills on a proficient .440 hitting percentage in her final regular-season home game. Fellow senior outside hitter Katie Mitchell added 10 kills at an even better .529 clip.The three other Buckeye seniors saw plenty of action as well. Middle blockers Tyler Richardson and Andrea Kacsits had seven and six kills, respectively, aided by the absence of junior Taylor Sandbothe. Richardson, along with freshman outside hitter Audra Appold, also led her team with three blocks.Freshman Taylor Hughes started and saw the majority of the playing time at setter with 32 assists, but senior Emily Ruetter did contribute four helpers.As the score would indicate, OSU far outpaced Rutgers offensively, posting a .319 attack percentage compared to the Scarlet Knights’ dismal .043 rate.Serving also played a key part in OSU’s commanding win. The Buckeyes racked up nine aces on the night, their second best total of the season.Libero Valeria León led the way with five aces, adding to another solid defensive night for the junior, who had a game-high 18 digs.Although the Buckeyes wound up having an overall impressive night from the service line, the match didn’t start off so well in that regard.Despite Rutgers’ abysmal .105 hitting percentage in the first set, it managed to hang around thanks to four blocks from its defense and four service errors by OSU.The Buckeyes managed to take decisive late lead, 22-17, but a 7-1 run by the Scarlet Knights allowed them to take a 24-23 advantage. Guided by two Campbell kills and a Rutgers error, however, OSU survived its only scare of the evening.Powered by six aces — four from León — the second frame featured the Buckeyes’ most lopsided win in any set this season. Behind a .417 attack percentage (and a brutal minus-.136 rate by Rutgers), the Scarlet and Gray raced out to a 16-2 lead — powered by a 12-0 run — and took an 18-point victory into the locker room for the intermission.It didn’t get any better for Rutgers after the break. With four kills each from Campbell, Mitchell and Kacsits, the Buckeyes attacked .387 for the set, which was more than enough to overpower another lowly percentage (.094) by the Scarlet Knights.While OSU might be done playing at home in the regular season, it could have at least one more match in St. John Arena.The team will now turn its attention to the postseason as it hopes to host the first two rounds of the NCAA tournament by earning a top-16 seed. The Buckeyes will find out their fate when the selection show airs Sunday at 9 p.m. read more

Spanish Super Cup will have a Final Four format
Spanish Super Cup will have a Final Four format

first_imgThe competition that faces the La Liga champion with the Copa del Rey champion will be played once again outside of Spain.The Spanish Super Cup will continue to change as announced by the Spanish Football Federation today in the European nation.Last year the Super Cup was played for the first time using a single match format, and it was also the first time to be played outside Spain as it was played in Tanger, Morocco.But today the cup has received another modification, as it will be played for the first time in history between four teams, in a Final Four format.The two finalists of the Copa del Rey and the two top teams in the Spanish La Liga will play a small tournament outside of Spain to decide who is the biggest champion in the nation.The announcement was made by Spanish FA’s president Luis Rubiales.The tournament will be played between four or five days and will be a four-game celebration, with the winners of La Liga playing against the Copa del Rey runner-ups and vice-versa.The first edition in this new format will be played at the end of this season for the first time if the federation’s assembly agrees.Gerard Pique, Neymar, BarcelonaLa Liga Betting: Match-day 4 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Despite it being very early into La Liga season, both Barcelona and Real Madrid have had unprecedented starts to their campaigns. With this in…According to Rubiales, the new format “does not break any rules and objectives of the competition.”“Neutral tournaments in the summer are not well supported for the clubs. We see this as a unique opportunity for the “Marca España” to grow without going against the principles of the sport.”Rubiales was one of the worst critics after La Liga decide to take one official game each year out of Spain, something that the Spanish Football Federation did not like.🗣 @LuisRubiales: “Propondré a la Asamblea que la #Supercopa se celebre en formato final four”🔗 https://t.co/NQM9nLYBCI pic.twitter.com/x640IaDOqU— RFEF (@rfef) February 19, 2019last_img read more

Vendome Group Acquires Healthcare and Capital Markets Conference
Vendome Group Acquires Healthcare and Capital Markets Conference

first_imgHealthcare and real estate media and events company Vendome Group has acquired the Healthcare and Capital Markets Conference (HCap), from Lincoln Healthcare Leadership, the company announced. “We are actively looking at all sorts of investment opportunities in the healthcare market and beyond,” Butler adds. “While events have been a strong focus over the past years, we remain very interested in digital and print media and related areas as well.” “In December of 2015, Vendome’s Behavioral Healthcare business unit launched its first investor-oriented event with great success,” Vendome founder and CEO Jane Butler tells Folio: in an email exchange. “We became aware of the Healthcare and Capital Markets Conference through a mutual exhibitor and saw an immediate opportunity to replicate [that success].” The company declined to share financial terms of the acquisition. In September, the company announced a partnership with credentialing standards developer IC&RC to expand several of its 2016 events with content from IC&RC’s Annual Training Conference. That announcement came just weeks after Vendome acquired the Ben Franklin Institute, an addiction and behavioral healthcare information provider. Most recently, Vendome launched the iASC, which Butler describes as “an ongoing educational warehouse for those who operate and work in long-term care settings.” Over 30 national or regional events are planned for 2016 across Vendome’s various divisions, according to Butler.center_img Launched in 2006, HCap aims to bring together healthcare executives and private equity or venture capital investors. It will join Vendome’s Healthcare group, which produces magazine titles Healthcare Informatics and Addiction Professional, among others, as well as a series of live events such as the National Conference on Addiction Disorders. Dates for the next Healthcare and Capital Markets Conference, traditionally held in Washington, D.C. in November or December, are forthcoming, according to a prepared statement. Within the Healthcare group, HCap will become part of Vendome’s Senior/Long-Term Care unit, which includes the magazine brand Long-Term Living, and will be integrated with Vendome’s newly-launched Institute for the Advancement of Senior Care (iASC). Vendome’s event business has grown exponentially in recent years, Butler tells Folio:, now comprising 40 percent of company revenues.last_img read more

Senate Passes Disaster Aid Package Lawmaker Blocks House Approval
Senate Passes Disaster Aid Package Lawmaker Blocks House Approval

first_img ADC AUTHOR The GOP-controlled Senate easily passed a $19.1 billion disaster aid package Thursday after lawmakers persuaded President Donald Trump to pull border aid from the stalled bill, CQ reported Thursday.The aid package included $2.7 billion to help military installations damaged by Hurricanes Florence and Michael last year and in flooding this year, including Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., and Camp Lejeune, N.C.House lawmakers had already left for their Memorial Day recess, but the leadership attempted approval by unanimous consent Friday.That effort was blocked by Rep. Chip Roy (R-Texas), a House Freedom Caucus member, who objected that the chamber had left Washington without holding a debate and floor vote, The Hill reported.“I’m here today primarily because if I do not object, Congress will have passed into law a bill that spends $19 billion of taxpayer money without members of Congress being present in our nation’s Capitol to vote on it,” Roy said on the floor.“Secondly, it’s a bill that includes nothing to address the clear national emergency and humanitarian crisis we have at our southern border,” he added.If approved, the measure would have gone to the president for his signature.Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Taylor Cooperlast_img read more

British MP makes serious bid to save Tata Steel jobs in Yorkshire

first_imgLabour Party lawmaker John Healey said he is pulling all stops to prevent Britain’s largest steel maker (Tata Steel) from firing 720 workers from its Yorkshire plant.”I have asked for an urgent meeting with the industry minister Anna Soubry next week,” 55-year-old MP from Wentworth and Dearne said in a statement on his official website.Healey has called for support to steel workers after a Tata director confirmed to him recently that 720 jobs (about 50 percent) would be laid off from its speciality steels plant at Aldwarke plant at Rotherham in South Yorkshire, which is in his constituency. The plant employs about 1,500 skilled workers.”With hundreds of forced redundancies ahead, steel workers are facing a bleak Christmas and new year. They need all the help we can get,” said Healey.Healey fears besides 350 compulsory redundancies, about 500 jobs would go at Aldwarke plant if a bail-out package was not announced soon.Though Soubry pledged to help during her recent visit to Rotherham after the steel summit in London on October 16 deliberated on the brewing crisis in the British steel industry, Healey said the Conservative governemnt did not release funds to bail out to ailing firms.”We need a support package for South Yorkshire on the same scale as was put in place in Scunthorpe where nine-million pounds from the government and Tata (firm) will help steel workers and the local economy,” he said in the statement.Tata laid off about 900 workers from its Scunthorpe plant in October.Lamenting that Rotherham became a forgotten town of the steel crisis, the opposition MP said the government did not make any announcement on the crisis in its autum statement on November 25.The Aldwarke plant makes steel bars for automobiles.Slowdown in the Chinese construction sector has resulted in excess supply in the global steel market and lower demand for British products.In a bid to prevent job losses, the British government exempted steelmakers from emission norms and issued fresh procuement guidelines to promote use of home-made steel in state-run building contracts.last_img read more

2 students go missing as a boat sinks in Padma river
2 students go missing as a boat sinks in Padma river

first_imgTwo students went missing as a boat sank in the Padma River at Thanpur Kheyaghat in Bagha upazila on Friday.The deceased were identified as Sabuj Ali, 18, a class XI student of Durudia College and son of Mantu of Sultanpur village and Manirul 14, a class X student of Thanpur High School and son of Chander Ali of Chandur area of the upazila.Local people said a boat carrying 45-50 passengers capsized in the middle of the river around 6:30 am.All but the two boys managed to swim ashore.The victims met the tragic accident while going to Kheyaghat area for harvesting jute.On information, the divers from Lalpur Fire Service Station went to the spot for carrying out salvage operation.last_img read more

Death toll in New Zealand mosque shootings reaches 49
Death toll in New Zealand mosque shootings reaches 49

first_imgA view of the Al Noor Mosque on Deans Avenue in Christchurch. Photo: ReutersNew Zealand’s police commissioner said on Friday 49 people were killed in Christchurch at two mosques and one man of four people arrested had been charged with murder.As many as 41 people died at one mosque, seven at another and one person died in hospital, Mike Bush told reporters, describing the attack as a “very well-planned event”.The man charged with murder is in his late 20s and should appear in Christchurch court on Saturday, Bush added.last_img read more

20 Million Gift Creates Mental Health Policy Center In Houston
20 Million Gift Creates Mental Health Policy Center In Houston

first_img Davis LandDr. Andy Keller, Dr. Michelle Harper, and Dr. Seema Shah answer questions regarding a Meadows Mental Health Institute report detailing the mental health needs of Harris County children on October 30, 2017.A $20 million gift from two Houston philanthropists — Maureen and Jim Hackett — will create The Hackett Center for Mental Health, a project meant to strengthen access to mental health care for patients in the Houston region. The center will be a part of Meadows Mental Health Policy Institute, which operates statewide. The new center, to be located in the Texas Medical Center, will focus specifically on the region surrounding Houston, according to a press release. “It’s transformative in the sense that’s it’s our first program that’s dedicated to a specific region and that is entirely about making that region work well,” Andy Keller, chief executive at Meadows Mental Health Policy Institute, told Houston Public Media. A recent report from the institute, funded by Houston Endowment, recommends primary care providers move from referring patients to mental health specialists to an “integrated care” model, where mental health care is provided alongside traditional medicine. The Hackett Center for Mental Health, administrators say, will work towards that model.“I really think and have felt and believed for some time that integrated care is the only way to treat health,” said Susan Fordice, director of the new center. “For so long we have really detached the head from the body, and the only thing that makes sense is to reattach the head to the body when it comes to our health,” she said.Fordice said the center will partner with other organizations in Houston and bring together insights from its work in the mental health community to inform state policy.  00:00 /00:53 X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listen Sharelast_img read more

Political Roundup March for Our Lives Protests and Reaction And Trump Administration
Political Roundup March for Our Lives Protests and Reaction And Trump Administration

first_imgIt’s time again for the Houston Matters weekly political roundup with analysis of national, state, and local political stories — with an eye for how they might affect Houston and Texas.Today, we discuss last weekend’s (March 24),  ‘March for Our Lives’ student protests and reaction, Stormy Daniels’ appearance on 60 Minutes, the Trump administration’s decision to expel 60 Russian diplomats, and highlights from Wednesday morning’s (March 28) Houston City Council meeting. Our panel of experts this week includes Jay Aiyer from Texas Southern University and co-host of Houston Public Media’s Party Politics podcast, and David Branham, professor of political science at the University of Houston-Downtown. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Share 00:00 /22:33 Listen Xlast_img read more

Twitter Echoes Baltimore Community Following DOJ Report
Twitter Echoes Baltimore Community Following DOJ Report

first_imgSocial media users went haywire after a recent Department of Justice report revealed evidence of racism and injustice within Baltimore’s police force. On Aug. 10, the phrases “Baltimore Police Department,” “Justice Department” and the hashtag #DOJReport were all trending on Twitter following the release of the shocking report.Kwame Rose“The DOJ report adds very little new information. For the most part it just confirms on paper what we’ve all been saying,” tweeted Baltimore activist Kwame Rose.The 163-page document detailed racial and gender discrimination, excessive force, and injustice. The investigation for this report was sparked by the death of Freddie Gray, a Black man who died from spinal injuries while in police custody last April. His death ignited riots in Baltimore and protests against police brutality across the country.Sherrilyn Ifill“300,000 stops in 5 years. But only 3.7% of stops result in citation or arrest. Worse than I thought. #DOJReport #Baltimore,” Sherrilyn Ifill, president and director-counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund wrote on Twitter.“It’s so much easier to focus on the frustrated reaction & call them ‘thugs’ than confront the abuse of power in plain sight. #Baltimore,” Ifill added.DeRay McKessonBaltimore activist DeRay McKesson also weighed in on the report. “The DOJ’s latest report re: the @BaltimorePolice is important, as it clearly outlines the scope & intensity of the civil rights violations,” tweeted McKesson. “Following the report, we will begin to press for a clear consent decree that will outline the required next steps for the @BaltimorePolice.”Johnetta ElzieBlack Lives Matter leader and civil rights activist Johnetta Elzie retweeted several of the most shocking quotes from the report. She also responded to a video of Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake saying that the results of the report are hard to hear. Elzie tweeted: “@MayorSRB hasn’t been actively listening for quite some time.”Laura CoatesSome felt that the police needed to take more responsibility for the accounts in the report. CNN legal analyst and former federal prosecutor Laura Coates tweeted, “Anyone else tired of the preface, ‘this is not an indictment on all police officers’? #Baltimore #DOJReport #DOJOnBPD.”Samuel SinyangweActivist Samuel Sinyangwe also wanted to hold police accountable for the documents findings. He tweeted, “Why do they close failing schools but not failing police departments?” While some were shocked by the results, for many the report just verified their pre-existing beliefs about police interactions with African Americans. “Biased zero tolerance policing is not a myth. It’s the everyday reality that Black people live every day,” tweeted Rose.Many users across the Web shared the sentiment. One user tweeted, “#DOJReport confirms what many have stated for years. Racial profiling.  Excessive force. Civil rights violations. Round and round it goes….”Still, some are hoping that this report will lead to improvements in the police force.  One user wrote: “DOJ Investigation into @BaltimorePolice is scathing! I hope it changes things! We need police to do their jobs not harass etc!”last_img read more

Flowery treats in the new year
Flowery treats in the new year

first_imgThe capital is ready to host the fifth International Horti Expo 2013 and the eighth International Flora Expo come new year. The exhibition will have theme pavilions on fresh fruits and vegetables, farm machineries, potato products and technologies, cold chain, logistics, organic, medicinal herbal products and floriculture.This expo has the Union Ministry of Agriculture as its principal sponsor along with a host of other departments including the National Medicinal Plant Board and Indian Flowers and Ornamental Plants Welfare Association. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting”Flowers are unique and are for every occasion, even death. A person can refuse chocolate or pastry, but not flowers,’ said S Jafar Naqvi, President, Indian Flowers and Ornamental Plants Welfare Association (iFlora). ‘Due to rising income, craving of the new generation, globalisation and internet, people in India are willing to spend profusely on floral decoration. So, this news would be a relief for anyone wanting a chunk of the bourgeoning Indian floral decoration markets through flowers and floral accessories,’ he said. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixLatest varieties of flowers like anthurium, gerbera and roses from Holland, Thailand, Germany, France and New Zealand will be exhibited in this Flora Expo, where Thailand is considered to be the main country in focus for blooms. There will also be a presentation with the theme of ‘Building Bridges through flowers between nations’. ‘IFlora and Flora Expo aim to increase per capita flower consumption even further to give more impetus to floriculture industry. We can’t have better time, and sky is the limit,’ said Jafar. India has a unique culture of flower consumption in many forms like garlands, flower-carpets, floral rains and floral jewelry etc in all celebrations. The Flora Expo will bring not only conventional flower and gardening industry professionals but also huge amount of buyers from new types of large industry retailers such as home centers, supermarkets, departmental stores and interior shops. And this exhibition is perhaps the only opportunity in India for international suppliers to meet and trade with all of them on one single platform.So flower lovers and  nature enthusiasts can mark their calendars out and enjoy a nice winter evening checking out the blooms  on display.DETAILAt: NSIC Exhibition Complex, Okhla When: 11 to 13 Januarylast_img read more

Fastingmimicking diet may reverse diabetes
Fastingmimicking diet may reverse diabetes

first_imgA diet designed to imitate the effects of fasting may reverse diabetes by reprogramming cells, claims a new study published in the journal cell that may help treat the condition without drugs or painful insulin injections. The fasting-like diet promotes the growth of new insulin-producing pancreatic cells that reduce symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in mice, according to the study on mice and human cells led by researchers at University of Southern California (USC) in the US. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”Cycles of a fasting-mimicking diet and a normal diet essentially reprogrammed non-insulin-producing cells into insulin-producing cells,” said Valter Longo, director of the Longevity Institute at the USC.”By activating the regeneration of pancreatic cells, we were able to rescue mice from late-stage type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We also reactivated insulin production in human pancreatic cells from type 1 diabetes patients,” said Longo.The reprogrammed adult cells and organs prompted a regeneration in which damaged cells were replaced with new functional ones, he said. The research is the latest in a series of studies to demonstrate promising health benefits of a brief, periodic diet that mimics the effects of a water-only fast. In type 1 and late-stage type 2 diabetes, the pancreas loses insulin-producing beta cells, increasing instability in blood sugar levels. The study showed a remarkable reversal of diabetes in mice placed on the fasting-mimicking diet for four days each week. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThey regained healthy insulin production, reduced insulin resistance and demonstrated more stable levels of blood glucose. This was the case even for mice in the later stages of the disease. The diet cycles switched on genes in the adult mice that are normally active only in the developing pancreases of foetal mice. The genes set off production of a protein, neurogenin-3 (Ngn3); thus, generating new, healthy insulin-producing beta cells. Longo and his team also examined pancreatic cell cultures from human donors and found that, in cells from type 1 diabetes patients, fasting also increased expression of the Ngn3 protein and accelerated insulin production. The results suggest that a fasting-mimicking diet could alleviate diabetes in humans. Another study by the same team published last week demonstrated that the fasting-mimicking diet reduced risks for cancer, diabetes, heart disease and other age-related diseases in human study participants who followed the special diet for five days each month in a three-month span. Prior studies on the diet have shown potential for alleviating symptoms of the neurodegenerative disease multiple sclerosis, increasing the efficacy of chemotherapy for cancer treatments, and decreasing visceral fat.last_img read more

GitHub updates developers and policymakers on EU copyright Directive at Brussels
GitHub updates developers and policymakers on EU copyright Directive at Brussels

first_imgOn Tuesday, the 16th of October, GitHub hosted Open Source and Copyright: from Industry 4.0 to SMEs in Brussels. Partnering with OpenForum Europe and Red Hat, the event was designed to raise awareness of the EU Copyright Directive among developers and policymakers. GitHub has made its position on the controversial legislation clear, saying that while “current copyright laws are outdated in many respects and need modernization, we are concerned that some aspects of the EU’s proposed copyright reform package would inadvertently affect software.” The event included further discussion on topics such as: Policy: For GitHub, Abby Vollmer shared how developers have been especially effective in getting policymakers to respond to problems with the copyright proposal and asked them to continue reaching out to policymakers about a technical fix to protect open source. Developers: Evis Barbullushi from Red Hat explained why open source is so fundamental to software and critical to the EU, using examples of what open source powers every day. He also highlighted the world-class and commercially mainstream nature of open source. SMEs: Sebastiano Toffaletti (from the European Digital SME Alliance) described concerns about the copyright proposal from the perspective of SMEs, including how efforts to regulate large platforms can end up harming SMEs even if they’re not the target. Research and academia: Roberto Di Cosmo (Software Heritage) wrapped up the talks by noting that he “should not be here, because, in a world in which software was better understood and valued, policymakers would never introduce a proposal that inadvertently puts software at great risk, and motivated developers to fix this underlying problem.” In its previous EU copyright proposal update, GitHub explained that the EU Council, Parliament, and Commission were ready to begin final-stage negotiations of the copyright proposal. These three institutions are now working on the exceptions to copyright for text and data mining (Article 3), among other technical elements of the proposal. Article 13 would likely drive many platforms to use upload filters on user-generated content. Article 2 defines which services are in the scope of Article 13, Articles 2 and 13 will be discussed together. This means developers can still contact policymakers with thoughts on what outcomes are best for software development. Read Next The LLVM project is ditching SVN for GitHub. The migration to Github has begun. GitHub Business Cloud is now FedRAMP authorized What we learnt from the GitHub Octoverse 2018 Reportlast_img read more

Emirates celebrates 20 years of connecting the world to Australia
Emirates celebrates 20 years of connecting the world to Australia

first_imgEmirates celebrates 20 years of connecting the world to AustraliaThis month Emirates celebrates 20 years of flying to Australia with the airline continuing to demonstrate its commitment to the market by increasing capacity through the deployment of two additional A380 aircraft on its Australian services this calendar year.Since launching services to Australia in June 1996, the airline has grown substantially from four flights a week from Dubai to Melbourne, Victoria, to 105 flights per week to five Australian cities today. This includes 11 daily flights from Dubai to five capital cities – Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide, and four daily flights from New Zealand to Australia.Over the last two decades the airline has experienced progressive growth in Australia and since commencing services to the country, Emirates has carried more than 27 million passengers on its Australian flights, boosting the nation’s annual AUD$30 billion export earnings from tourism. While in 2015-16, Emirates carried more than 3.3 million passengers on its Australian flights, with an average seat factor of 80 percent – one of the highest amongst carriers operating in the Australian market.From a cargo perspective, Emirates is the second largest international cargo carrier in Australia, with market share of over 11%. While overall, including both international and domestic cargo, Emirates is the third largest cargo carrier in this market.Barry Brown, Emirates Divisional Vice President for Australasia, said the milestone highlights the airline’s ongoing commitment to the Australian market.“Australia is one of Emirates’ most important markets and it has been incredible to witness the expansion of our network across the country over the past 20 years, which has allowed us to connect more travellers from around the world to Australia through our convenient Dubai hub.“Australia is the third largest A380 destination for the airline globally. The deployment of additional A380 aircraft in Australia this year provides further opportunities for those travelling to Australia to experience our world-class product and enjoy a seamless A380 journey, while increasing our capacity and delivering substantial economic benefits through travel connections, cargo and inbound seats,” said Mr. Brown.Already this year, Emirates added its sixth daily A380 service to Australia, replacing the B777-300ER aircraft on flights EK404 and EK405 between Dubai and Melbourne, which operate via Singapore.While from August, Emirates is scheduled to increase this number to a total of seven daily A380 flights to Australia, up-gauging flights EK424 and EK425 between Dubai and Perth, Western Australia.In addition, in the last 12 months Emirates demonstrated its commitment to the Australian market by unveiling new Business Class lounges at Melbourne and Perth international airports.This year Emirates also celebrated the third anniversary of its codeshare partnership with Qantas, which allows Emirates customers to connect to Qantas’ Australian domestic network of more than 50 destinations and 3,900 flights per week, while Qantas customers are able to access more than 45 Emirates destinations in Europe, the Middle East and North Africa.In the time that Emirates has flown to Australia, the airline has invested more than AUD$90 million in local sponsorships of a number of Australia’s leading sporting and cultural institutions, ranging from the Emirates Melbourne Cup and the Australian Open Tennis, Collingwood Football Club, Emirates Australian Open Golf through to the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, Sydney Symphony Orchestra. Emirates AirlineSource = Emirates Airlinelast_img read more

Best of Vietnam on Lady Get Together Famil
Best of Vietnam on Lady Get Together Famil

first_imgBest of Vietnam on “Lady Get Together” Famil Hoi An’s Japanese covered bridge was just one of the iconic sites visited by the TravelManagers’ famil group – (L-R) back row: Jodie Payne, Maree Evans, KJ Slater (Vietnam Travel and Cruise), Anne-Maree Selmo and Lisa King; front row: Lois Crook, Sally Barron, Kerry Cleasby, Michelle Kingston, Judy Gillings and Huyen Thanh (Vietnam Travel and Cruise)Best of Vietnam on “Lady Get Together” FamilWith the demand for women-only holidays and wellness retreats steadily on the increase, travel companies are looking to tap into this trend by developing products specifically tailored to suit this market. Ten personal travel managers recently spent nine days in Vietnam on a TravelManagers exclusive “Lady Get-Together” famil that was specifically designed to showcase some of the experiences and locations most favoured by the so-called “she-conomy.”Lois Crook, who is TravelManagers’ representative for Engadine, NSW, says prior to the famil she found it difficult to sell Vietnam effectively, and notes that there is no substitute for first-hand experience.“The knowledge I now have of Vietnam as a destination, particularly for solo female travellers and women-only groups, means I can now sell it confidently,” she explains. “I’m already receiving some great enquiry from the content I posted on social media while I was away, and I feel confident of my ability to convert this interest into bookings.”The group, who were escorted by K J Slater, who is the Australian-based Business Development Manager for Vietnam Travel & Cruise, began their itinerary in Hoi An – a charming sixteenth-century merchant town with strong Japanese and Chinese influences. After a walking tour of the old quarter, they were treated to the first of many delicious Vietnamese meals at Anthony Bourdain’s favourite spot to pick up a classic Vietnam baguette: Banh My Phuong.“Hoi An was fantastic,” enthuses Jodie Payne, representative for Cranbrook, QLD. “I loved trying the local food specialities and the town is so beautiful, especially walking along the river at night with all the lanterns glowing. The shopping was pretty fabulous too!”While in Hoi An, the group also had the chance to experience traditional Vietnamese culture beyond the cities, cycling along picturesque country roads to a farming village, sharing in daily farm life and trying their hand at traditional fishing techniques using round and cast nets.From Hoi An, they flew north to the country’s capital of Hanoi, where they had time to explore the city’s Old Quarter on foot, learn about hand-making and dyeing organic cotton and take a cyclo tour of the city before heading to World Heritage-listed Halong Bay for an overnight cruise.“It was so great to get an understanding of the different areas of the bay you can cruise in and the number of boats in each area,” Crook reports. “Our cruise took us to one of the quieter areas of this stunning bay, which made for a much more authentic, less touristy experience – knowledge that will be useful for ensuring that my clients have a wonderful time too.”“It was a magical, luxurious experience,” adds Judy Gillings, TravelManagers’ representative for Bateau Bay, NSW. “We had a wonderful Cruise Director, great food and the cabins were to die for. Personally, I would recommend my clients opt for an extra night here in order to really soak up the incredible scenery.”TravelManagers’ Executive General Manager, Michael Gazal, says the famil was organised in recognition of Vietnam’s increasing popularity to women-only groups, noting its shopping, dining and cultural experiences as particularly appealing to this segment of travellers.“Many of our PTMs are already actively pursuing a range of special interest groups, ranging from cooking schools to health and wellbeing. Recognition that one destination offers a range of itineraries is intrinsic to our PTMs’ ability to tailor diverse and distinct holidays to their clients.”The famil group also visited Sapa, a mountainous region in the northwest of Vietnam that is not far from the Chinese border. Their time here was spent hiking about the rice paddy terraces, shopping in Sapa town’s markets and taking a cable car ride to the peak of Fansipan which, as the highest mountain in Indochina, is known as “the Roof of Indochina”.“Experiencing the cultural side of Vietnam in Sapa added another thread to the fabric of our time in this friendly and diverse country,” says Gilling. “Everywhere we went there was so much to see, from the Old Town of Hoi An, to crazy and amazing Hanoi, and the beauty of Halong Bay.”Both Gilling and Payne agree that they are committed to a return visit to Vietnam: “I cannot wait to go back,” says Payne. “There is something for everyone in this amazing country so I would definitely go back with the family and I also see a girls’ trip, packed with shopping, eating, drinking and massages, in my future!”For more information or to speak to someone confidentially about TravelManagers please contact Suzanne Laister on 1800 019 599 Source = TravelManagerslast_img read more