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Fine allegations : Tomaselli to be sentenced for sexual abuse charges

first_img Published on April 6, 2012 at 12:00 pm Zach Tomaselli is scheduled to be sentenced Wednesday to a state prison for sexually abusing a 13-year-old boy in 2009.Tomaselli, 23, of Lewiston, Maine, accused Bernie Fine, former Syracuse University associate men’s basketball coach, of molesting him in a Pittsburgh hotel room in 2002 during an away game. He is scheduled to be sentenced at 8:30 a.m. in Superior Court in Auburn, Maine, according to an April 6 article in The Post-Standard.Justin Leary, Tomaselli’s attorney, said Maine Supreme Court Justice Robert Clifford is expected to sentence Tomaselli to three years and three months in state prison, according to the article. Tomaselli will begin serving his sentence April 18.Lewiston police arrested Tomaselli on April 13, 2011, on charges of having sexual contact with a boy who attended a camp where Tomaselli was a counselor.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textHowever, much of Tomaselli’s sentence was suspended after he pleaded guilty to gross sexual assault, unlawful sexual contact and two other sex-related counts on Dec. 20, according to the article. His plea was part of an agreement that allowed seven other counts to be dropped as well.Leary said it is hoped Tomaselli will be able to participate in a sex offender counseling program while he is in prison, according to the article. The sentence includes further counseling and six years of probation after prison. If Tomaselli violates the probation, he risks returning to prison for an additional eight years and nine months.On Friday, Tomaselli said he is ready to begin serving his sentence and hopes counseling will help him, according to the article. Fine has not been charged and denies all accusations.rebarill@syr.edu Commentscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Why Older People Are Most At Risk From COVID-19

first_imgThe innate immune response is tuned to pounce on types of molecules that are commonly found on bacteria and viruses but not in human cells. When a cell detects these invader molecules, it triggers production of an antiviral interferon protein. Interferon triggers the infected cell to die, limiting infection. Older Immune Systems Are Weaker Maybe your physician has checked your white blood cell levels. That’s a measurement of whether you have more B-cells and T-cells in your blood than usual, presumably because they’re fighting infection. However, the statistics get grimmer as the patients get older. Whereas people in their 60s have a 0.4 percent chance of dying, people in their 70s have a 1.3 percent chance of dying, and people over 80 have a 3.6 percent chance of dying. While this may not sound like a high chance of death, during the outbreak in Italy, 83 percent of those who succumbed to COVID-19 infection were over age 60. When a pathogen invades, the difference between illness and health is a race between how fast the pathogen can spread within you and how fast your immune response can react without causing too much collateral damage. The mist ejected by a sneeze can launch viruses airborne, so other people can inhale them. That’s where your immune system comes in. It’s your body’s defense system against these kinds of invaders. Before you’re even born, your body starts producing specialized B-cells and T-cells – types of white blood cells that can recognize pathogens and help block their growth. Another type of innate immune cell, called a monocyte, acts as a sort of cellular bouncer, getting rid of any infected cells it finds and signaling the adaptive immune response to shift into gear. Keeping at least 6 feet away from other people helps significantly reduce your chance of being infected by these aerosol droplets. But there’s still the possibility for virus to contaminate surfaces that infected people have touched or coughed on. Therefore, the best way to protect vulnerable older and immunocompromised people is to stay away from them until there is no longer a risk. When you’re very young, you don’t have a lot of these B- or T-cells. It can be a challenge for your body to control infection because it’s simply not used to the job. As you mature, your adaptive immune system learns to recognize pathogens and handle these constant invasions, allowing you to fight off infection quickly and effectively. The coronavirus pandemic is taking a particularly harsh toll on older people. As you age, the reduced “attention span” of your innate and adaptive immune responses make it harder for the body to respond to viral infection, giving the virus the upper hand. Viruses can take advantage of your immune system’s slow start and quickly overwhelm you, resulting in serious disease and death. COVID-19 is caused by a respiratory virus, which can spread via tiny virus-containing droplets. Larger droplets fall to the ground quickly; very small droplets dry up. Mid-range droplets are of most concern because they can float in the air for a few feet before drying. These droplets can be inhaled into the lungs. Data from the initial outbreak in China and then Italy show that infected people under the age of 60 are at low—but not no—risk of dying from COVID-19. More recent data from the U.S. suggest that a higher rate of people in their 30s and 40s have experienced severe illness and even death than previously thought. Curiously, young children do not appear to be at increased risk of serious COVID-19 complications, in contrast to what happens with other viruses, like the seasonal flu. Low-grade chronic inflammation in individuals that commonly occurs during aging can also dull the ability of the innate and adaptive immune responses to react to pathogens. It’s similar to becoming used to an annoying sound over time.center_img The innate and adaptive immune systems can act together as a fine-tuned machine to detect and clear out pathogens. Everyone, no matter their age, needs to protect themselves from infection, not just to keep themselves healthy but also to help protect the most vulnerable. Given the difficulty older individuals have in controlling viral infection, the best option is for these individuals to avoid becoming infected by viruses in the first place. During an infection, your B-cells can proliferate and produce antibodies that grab onto pathogens and block their ability to spread within your body. T-cells work by recognizing infected cells and killing them. Together they make up what scientists call your “adaptive” immune system. The Covid-19, health, safety and pandemic concept – senior old lonely woman wearing protective medical mask sitting near the window in his house for protection from virus Social Distancing Is Vital While white blood cells are powerful people protectors, they’re not enough on their own. Luckily, your immune system has another layer, what’s called your “innate” immune response. Every cell has its own little immune system that allows it to directly respond to pathogens quicker than it takes to mobilize the adaptive response. What is it that puts older people at increased risk from viruses like this? It’s primarily thought to be due to changes in the human immune system as they age. Your Body’s Tools to Fight Off Virus Infections Brian Geiss is an Associate Professor of Microbiology, Immunology & Pathology at Colorado State University As people age, their innate and adaptive immune responses change, shifting this balance. This is where washing hands, avoiding touching your face, self-isolation and social distancing all become important, especially for COVID-19. As you go about your life, your body is constantly bombarded by pathogens – bacteria, fungi and viruses that can make you sick. A human body is a great place for these organisms to grow and thrive, providing a nice warm environment with plenty of nutrients. As COV1D-19 continues to spread, this older age group will continue to be at risk for serious disease and death.last_img read more

Shelter set to open in December

first_img “The miracle is it always happens,” she said. “It’s just wonderful. It just all comes together, and it’s coming together again this year.” The Santa Clarita Valley in 2005 is home to about 231,921, with a median household income of $79,200, according to the Goleta, Calif.-based California Economic Forecast. About 77 people used the shelter last year, the SCCDC said. Preheim said she is recruiting volunteers to prepare dinner – she still has about 80 evenings to fill. “We don’t have running water up there and everything needs to be disposable,” she said. “If people bring food, they have to be warm. We don’t have a kitchen up there.” The shelter also needs bottled water, paper plates and plastic utensils; hot drink mixes such as coffee and cocoa;and instant soup, oatmeal and savory snacks. “We like to put that in the lunches,” Preheim said. “A lot of them work, and they need the salt.” Prospective volunteers and donors can contact the SCCDC at (661) 259-2267 for more information. Eugene Tong, (661) 257-5253 eugene.tong@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SANTA CLARITA – An emergency winter shelter for the homeless is slated to open by mid-December as organizers scramble to rebuild the 40-bed facility from scratch. The Santa Clarita Community Development Corp. aims to open the shelter for the ninth consecutive winter on a county Department of Public Works maintenance yard at 21190 Centre Pointe Parkway between Dec. 9 and 15, officials said Tuesday. The shelter will close March 15. Among the challenges are whether crews can deliver and convert two double-wide trailers into a code-approved shelter; securing portable toilets and wash basins; and hiring two night security guards. The trailers are scheduled to arrive Dec. 5. “The 9th is the most optimistic, and that’s with all the plans lined up,” shelter manager Barbara Preheim said of the opening date. “We can’t guarantee that, but that’s what we’re trying. The latest will be the 15th.” AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals The projected opening dates come after Dec. 1, when winter shelters throughout Los Angeles County are scheduled to open. But it’s earlier than the Dec. 24 opening last year, when politics and the usual rash of NIMBYism endemic to areas near proposed shelter sites clouded the program’s future. The Community Development Corp. does not own property, and shelter organizers must disassemble and rebuild the facility every few years at a new site. It landed at the public works yard last year after its lease with the city of Santa Clarita to operate at the Via Princessa Metrolink station’s parking lot expired. This year, county Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich proposed to stage the shelter at the Pitchess Detention Center’s parking lot, in the unincorporated community of Castaic northwest of the city. But area residents shouted down the plan, and with the clock ticking, officials once again turned to the maintenance yard, which is in the city. “Supervisor Antonovich is obviously pleased that we are able to work with all the interested parties to complete the process,” said Tony Bell, a spokesman for the 5th District county supervisor. “We will be able to provide a place for the homeless in the cold winter months.” It’s uncertain where the shelter will go next winter. County officials preferred to focus on this year, while the city wants to press the county to abide by a deal to host the shelter in the unincorporated area alternate years. Despite the annual bout with controversy, Preheim remains optimistic. last_img read more