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A NEW ERA: Syracuse holds off Kansas State to win first bowl game since 2001

first_img Published on December 29, 2010 at 12:00 pm Comments NEW YORK — Nathaniel Hackett saw something click in Marcus Sales four weeks ago in practice. Something changed, in his work ethic and preparation.And when he saw Sales standing in the end zone for the third time on the day, with 7:53 remaining, it was clear something did click. After a season in which the junior wide receiver scored just one touchdown, Sales tripled his scoring output in one game.‘It feels real good,’ Sales said. ‘Finally, I got a chance and I just made the plays when they counted.’Behind a strong rushing attack led by Delone Carter and a big-play passing attack led by Sales, the offensive play-caller Hackett and head coach Doug Marrone’s offense opened up Thursday. In a wild inaugural New Era Pinstripe Bowl in Yankee Stadium in front of 38,274, Syracuse (8-5, 4-3 Big East) was able to keep up and win a 36-34 shootout over Kansas State (7-6, 3-5 Big 12).The win gave SU its first bowl victory since the 2001 Insight.com Bowl — also against Kansas State.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text‘They made a young kid from the Bronx’s dream come true,’ Marrone said of his players while accepting the Pinstripe Bowl trophy. ‘And win this trophy at Yankee Stadium!’The Orange defense bent but did not break late in the fourth quarter, which sealed the victory. With 1:13 remaining, KSU quarterback Carson Coffman tossed a 30-yard touchdown strike to Adrian Hilburn, who flashed a celebratory salute after scoring. The officials issued a personal foul for excessive celebration. Down by two, the Wildcats couldn’t convert the two-point conversion from 18 yards out.When asked about the penalty after the game, Kansas State head coach Bill Snyder paused four seconds before saying, ‘I can’t comment on that.’Though the Syracuse defense ultimately preserved the win, it was the SU’s offense that uncharacteristically brought the team to that point.Carter and the combination of quarterback Ryan Nassib and Sales carried Syracuse throughout the game. Twenty-seven carries, a career-high 198 yards and two touchdowns for the senior running back Carter in his swan song for the Orange.Five catches, 172 yards and three touchdowns all added up to a career game for the once-forgotten Sales. Nassib was happy to feed him the ball, as 172 of Nassib’s 239 passing yards and all three of his touchdowns went to Sales.Marrone singled Sales out in Wednesday’s pre-Pinstripe Bowl meeting with his team, reflecting upon the progress he saw in Sales.‘I pointed out Marcus Sales and how well he’s worked and the practices he’s had,’ Marrone said of that meeting. ‘And he came out and had a big game.’An SU offense that had only one play go more than 50 yards all year long would double that total Thursday.The first of those plays that came late in the first quarter. The Orange marched close to the 50-yard line, Hackett’s target point to open up the offense. And as Hackett looked at the KSU coverage, he knew the safety would bite.So as Antwon Bailey ran up the middle for what looked like a simple, straight-ahead running play, Hackett broke out the trickery. Bailey flung the ball back to Nassib on a flea flicker, and Nassib hung a perfect spiraling throw 52 yards to Sales to tie the game at 7-7.‘We practiced it all week,’ Sales said. ‘I knew it had a chance to come to me when the safety came down. So I just put my head down and ran, and looked for the ball when it came. And I caught it.’Behind another long Sales touchdown catch — this time from 36 yards out — SU went into the half tied at 14-14. The second half quickly turned into a shootout, with Syracuse and Kansas State trading offensive blows. Carter barreled in for two touchdowns, but the Wildcats answered with two touchdown scores of their own.The Orange found itself trailing by a point with 11 minutes left when Sales’ number was called again on the game-changing drive. First, he caught a crucial 18-yard pass to extend Syracuse’s drive on third down.And his second act came with the Orange on the KSU 44-yard line. Sales’ defender slipped, setting him wide open down the field, and Nassib found him again for the long touchdown score that gave SU the lead for good.The receiver who wasn’t on the depth chart at the beginning of SU’s season carried the team and program to its biggest victory in a decade.Flashing an uncharacteristic grin that was reminiscent of the boy from the Bronx, Marrone thought it was a fitting resemblance for where his program has come in just two short years.‘It’s about creating challenges and goals for your players,’ Marrone said. ‘And they responded.’bplogiur@syr.educenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Why Older People Are Most At Risk From COVID-19

first_imgThe innate immune response is tuned to pounce on types of molecules that are commonly found on bacteria and viruses but not in human cells. When a cell detects these invader molecules, it triggers production of an antiviral interferon protein. Interferon triggers the infected cell to die, limiting infection. Older Immune Systems Are Weaker Maybe your physician has checked your white blood cell levels. That’s a measurement of whether you have more B-cells and T-cells in your blood than usual, presumably because they’re fighting infection. However, the statistics get grimmer as the patients get older. Whereas people in their 60s have a 0.4 percent chance of dying, people in their 70s have a 1.3 percent chance of dying, and people over 80 have a 3.6 percent chance of dying. While this may not sound like a high chance of death, during the outbreak in Italy, 83 percent of those who succumbed to COVID-19 infection were over age 60. When a pathogen invades, the difference between illness and health is a race between how fast the pathogen can spread within you and how fast your immune response can react without causing too much collateral damage. The mist ejected by a sneeze can launch viruses airborne, so other people can inhale them. That’s where your immune system comes in. It’s your body’s defense system against these kinds of invaders. Before you’re even born, your body starts producing specialized B-cells and T-cells – types of white blood cells that can recognize pathogens and help block their growth. Another type of innate immune cell, called a monocyte, acts as a sort of cellular bouncer, getting rid of any infected cells it finds and signaling the adaptive immune response to shift into gear. Keeping at least 6 feet away from other people helps significantly reduce your chance of being infected by these aerosol droplets. But there’s still the possibility for virus to contaminate surfaces that infected people have touched or coughed on. Therefore, the best way to protect vulnerable older and immunocompromised people is to stay away from them until there is no longer a risk. When you’re very young, you don’t have a lot of these B- or T-cells. It can be a challenge for your body to control infection because it’s simply not used to the job. As you mature, your adaptive immune system learns to recognize pathogens and handle these constant invasions, allowing you to fight off infection quickly and effectively. The coronavirus pandemic is taking a particularly harsh toll on older people. As you age, the reduced “attention span” of your innate and adaptive immune responses make it harder for the body to respond to viral infection, giving the virus the upper hand. Viruses can take advantage of your immune system’s slow start and quickly overwhelm you, resulting in serious disease and death. COVID-19 is caused by a respiratory virus, which can spread via tiny virus-containing droplets. Larger droplets fall to the ground quickly; very small droplets dry up. Mid-range droplets are of most concern because they can float in the air for a few feet before drying. These droplets can be inhaled into the lungs. Data from the initial outbreak in China and then Italy show that infected people under the age of 60 are at low—but not no—risk of dying from COVID-19. More recent data from the U.S. suggest that a higher rate of people in their 30s and 40s have experienced severe illness and even death than previously thought. Curiously, young children do not appear to be at increased risk of serious COVID-19 complications, in contrast to what happens with other viruses, like the seasonal flu. Low-grade chronic inflammation in individuals that commonly occurs during aging can also dull the ability of the innate and adaptive immune responses to react to pathogens. It’s similar to becoming used to an annoying sound over time.center_img The innate and adaptive immune systems can act together as a fine-tuned machine to detect and clear out pathogens. Everyone, no matter their age, needs to protect themselves from infection, not just to keep themselves healthy but also to help protect the most vulnerable. Given the difficulty older individuals have in controlling viral infection, the best option is for these individuals to avoid becoming infected by viruses in the first place. During an infection, your B-cells can proliferate and produce antibodies that grab onto pathogens and block their ability to spread within your body. T-cells work by recognizing infected cells and killing them. Together they make up what scientists call your “adaptive” immune system. The Covid-19, health, safety and pandemic concept – senior old lonely woman wearing protective medical mask sitting near the window in his house for protection from virus Social Distancing Is Vital While white blood cells are powerful people protectors, they’re not enough on their own. Luckily, your immune system has another layer, what’s called your “innate” immune response. Every cell has its own little immune system that allows it to directly respond to pathogens quicker than it takes to mobilize the adaptive response. What is it that puts older people at increased risk from viruses like this? It’s primarily thought to be due to changes in the human immune system as they age. Your Body’s Tools to Fight Off Virus Infections Brian Geiss is an Associate Professor of Microbiology, Immunology & Pathology at Colorado State University As people age, their innate and adaptive immune responses change, shifting this balance. This is where washing hands, avoiding touching your face, self-isolation and social distancing all become important, especially for COVID-19. As you go about your life, your body is constantly bombarded by pathogens – bacteria, fungi and viruses that can make you sick. A human body is a great place for these organisms to grow and thrive, providing a nice warm environment with plenty of nutrients. As COV1D-19 continues to spread, this older age group will continue to be at risk for serious disease and death.last_img read more

Heppler, Kramer spark Hawks past Nitros 2-1 to stay alive in Kootenay Conference Playoff

first_imgThe Beaver Valley Nitehawks live to play again.Dylan Heppler had two points and Tallon Kramer stopped 26 shots to spark the Murdoch Division Champs to a 2-1 victory over the Kimberley Dynamiters in Kootenay International Junior Hockey League Kootenay Conference playoff action Saturday night in Fruitvale.Kimberley leads the best-of-seven series 3-1 with Game five set for Monday in the Bavarian City.The Hawks scored all the goals they would need on the power play in the second period to post their first win of the series.Heppler, selected Game Star for the Hawks, opened the scoring 15 seconds into the frame on the power play before Blake Sidoni made it 2-0 with an extra-man marker later in the period. Jared Marchi scored Kimberley’s only goal late in the third.But that was all the scoring the defending KIJHL could muster as Kramer shut the door.Tyson Brouwer was solid between the pipes for Kimberley, and was name the Nitros Game Star.If a Game six is neccesary, it will be played Tuesday in Fruitvale.In the Okanagan/Shuswap Conference Playoff, 100 Mile House defeated Summerland 5-4 to take a 3-1 advantage in the best-of-seven series.Game five is Monday in 100 Mile House.last_img read more

Team effort clinches Kootenay Summer Swim Association Regional Title for Neptunes

first_imgThe Nelson Neptunes continue to get better with age.The Heritage City club stole the show at the Kootenay Summer Swim Association Regionals this past weekend in Colville, Wash., finishing ahead of the rest of the field to claim the overall title.Neptunes coach Cynthia Pfeiffer said every single Neptune swimmer finished in the top three of their respective individual event, or top two in relay events.This means the entire team qualified for the upcoming BC Summer Swim Association Championships, August 19-21 in Coquitlam.“I don’t think it’s our talent in our pool that we can solely attribute our win to,” Pfeiffer said. “I believe the strong bond our team has, and the care and excitement we have for all of our teammates is what has gotten us through the difficulties of our last few seasons, and has allowed us to still come out on top.”Pfeiffer said the formula for selecting the winning team at the Regionals was calculated by taking overall points and dividing it by number of swimmers who attended the meet.Nelson took a clear lead in front of second place Kimberley and West Kootenay rival Castlegar.Highlights of this meet include Lachlan Bibby-Fox, Kallie Badry, and Jaylen Rushton sweeping gold in their events; Enna Cowan’s four best times; Madeline Holitzki’s first time 200-meter IM and Olivia Cowan’s first place 100 meter Freestyle.Then there was Morgan Robertson-Weir, Chloe Malenfant, and Jaylen Rushton’s Neptune sweep in 50-meter Butterfly as well as both Division 3 and Division 4 girls winning all four of their relays. “This little team has a lot of team spirit and I don’t think anything can slow them down,” Pfeiffer said.Pfeiffer said 13 of the 20 Neptune qualifiters have committed to make the trip down to Coquitlam to compete for the Kootenay region. She said races to watch for include Jaylen Rushton and Lachlan Bibby-Foxes 50-meter Breaststroke.The Neptunes, who spent the past few seasons on the road, will be back in the friendly confines of the NDCC Pool next now that renovations to the facility are close to completion.last_img read more

Streaming giant Netflix has bought a documentary a
Streaming giant Netflix has bought a documentary a

first_imgStreaming giant Netflix has bought a documentary about professional ‘amateur’ pornography following the Sundance Film Festival.Hot Girls Wanted, which comes from directors Jill Bauer and Ronna Gradus, will premieres in all Netflix territories this year. The filmed debuted at the recent doc festival in the US.The doc follows young women that cycle through the world of professional ‘amateur’ porn, focusing on one that uses the internet to swaps her small town life for one of a fledgling adult actress.“Jill and Ronna have exposed a shocking world of hope and heartbreak,” said Erik Barmack, Netflix’s VP of global independent content. “The filmmakers gained unprecedented access into a world never documented until now, and we are proud to bring their unflinching work to a global audience.”“Netflix is the ideal partner for us; not only do they understand this film but they’re the perfect platform to reach the many people who need to see it,” said actress Rashida Jones, who produced the doc.Bauer, Gradus, Jones and Brittany Huckabee, who is also writer and editor, produced the project.Bauer and Gradus’ debut documentary, Sexy Baby, is already available on Netflix.On Friday, Netflix revealed its latest comedy stand-up special, Aziz Ansari: Live at Madison Square Garden. It launches in all Netflix territories on March 6.last_img read more