Tag Archives 杭州桑拿spa

Nestlé nurtures future footballers

first_imgNestlé’s Milo brand is getting behind football in South Africa by supporting its development in schools. (Image: Nestlé Milo) MEDIA CONTACTS • Ravi PillayNestlé public affairs manager+27 11 889 6799 or + 27 82 908 2580RELATED ARTICLES • SA’s children get football fever • Peace football tournament for SA • Football for Hope to unite SA • Fly the Flag for Football toolkitJanine ErasmusThe 2009 Nestlé Milo Champions tournament brought almost 6 000 schools from around South Africa together in Soweto to compete for the trophy, as well as R100 000 (US$13 300) for the winning school to invest in a health, wellness or nutrition initiative.With the 2010 Fifa World Cup now scant months away, football fever in all forms is gripping the nation as never before. Last year’s Milo Champions competition, run in collaboration with the South African Schools Football Association (Sasfa) and the Supersport television channel, was the second edition.About 94 500 would-be football stars participated in the 2009 tournament, with around 75 000 children from some 4 800 schools taking part in the 2008 event.Dorothy Langa Primary School in Limpopo province was the ultimate winner, snatching the title from Mpumalanga’s Mapula Sindane School in an exciting final that came down to a penalty shoot-out. Dorothy Langa, with two goals to Mapula’s one, emerged triumphant.“It is great to see that school competitions like this are not dominated by one school,” said Dorothy Langa head coach Mpho Mathopa. “Our achievement has reflected the true spirit of competition and shown that there is a balance of football talent in the country.”Developing future talentThe competition was open to all South African primary schools, and took place over four months. District and regional winners went through to the provincial play-offs, and the nine provincial winners progressed to the national finals at Hyundai Park in Soweto.“We want to see growth in school soccer in our country,” said Sasfa president Mandla “Shoes” Mazibuko. “Next year we will make sure that more schools take part in this wonderful tournament.”Global food giant Nestlé has invested generously in the Milo Champions tournament. In addition to the grand prize, each provincial winner walked off with R10 000 ($1 320), while the runner-up took home R75 000 and the third-placed team won R50 000 ($6 600).The programme is intended primarily to foster young football talent in South Africa while promoting an enthusiasm for the beautiful game and an awareness of the importance of healthy living. As well as valuable football coaching from top players, all participants received comprehensive nutritional education.Nestlé South Africa MD Yves Manghardt said, “We at Nestlé hope that each child who has played in this tournament comes out a winner, having learnt about teamwork, determination and most importantly why sports and a healthy lifestyle are qualities that will stand them strong through life.”Nurturing football skillsDorothy Langa chose to use the money for a new football field, which was officially opened towards the end of 2009. The 68m x 50m field, complete with borehole to ensure that the pitch is always green, was a welcome addition to the school’s infrastructure.To celebrate the occasion former Bafana Bafana defender Mark Fish gave a coaching clinic at the school. Fish is Nestlé’s Milo brand ambassador for good health, and also took time to visit each of the nine finalists beforehand to help with their preparations for the big day.At the same time Nestlé launched the South African branch of its Healthy Kids programme. This is a global initiative that aims to fight the growing problem of malnutrition and obesity in children between the ages of four and 16. By encouraging good nutrition and exercise, Healthy Kids aims to raise a healthier, more active generation.The programme was introduced to the world in April 2009 by Nestlé CEO Paul Bulcke.Regional competitionIn anticipation of the first World Cup to take place on African soil, the Milo brand is deepening its association with football in South Africa by extending the Champions tournament to the entire African continent.The inaugural African Milo Champions tournament was launched in September 2009 and features top under-13 teams from Nigeria, South Africa, Kenya, Ghana and Cote d’Ivoire. Regional stages are already underway, and the final will take place in South Africa in May 2010, just before the month-long Fifa World Cup kicks off in June.last_img read more

Facebook developing satellite internet for Africa

first_img8 October 2015Facebook and French satellite operator Eutelsat wants to launch an internet-satellite that could boost internet connectivity in more than 14 African countries, including South Africa. Easier and more reliable access to the internet could offer substantial benefits to the vision of the social, educational and health care ideals of the National Development Plan.The Facebook-financed satellite, named Amos-6, would be able to offer faster and more reliable internet access to isolated areas in Africa, and was scheduled to be completed and in orbit by 2016, Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, posted on the social networking site on 5 October.“Facebook has been exploring ways to use aircraft and satellites to beam internet access down into communities from the sky,” Zuckerberg wrote. “To connect people living in remote regions, traditional connectivity infrastructure is often difficult and inefficient, so we need to invent new technologies.”Facebook will bring free Internet to Africa with a #satellite called AMOS -6 http://t.co/DA28sBYRyZ pic.twitter.com/nrSL3EpkKR— SocialPubli.com (@SocialPubli) October 6, 2015The satellite project is part of Facebook’s Internet.org non-profit initiative that aims to bring free and reliable internet access to the two-thirds of the world that have been unable to receive it.Other projects include using solar-powered drones to beam out internet signals to rural areas, and the set-up of the Innovation Lab to mimic real-world connectivity issues for developers to test their apps’ performances. Similarly, Google’s Project Loon, that uses high-altitude balloons to bring internet to isolated areas, is being tested in the US, Australia and parts of Saharan Africa.Sub-Saharan Africa’s current level of broadband connectivity is the lowest in the world, according to the United Nations’ 2014 State of Broadband report. It reaches less than 2% of the populations in countries such as Guinea, Somalia, Burundi and Eritrea. The internet remains a novelty and not so much the vital communications tool needed to push African development and innovation forward.Governments will be able to use the surge in access to bring better services to people in rural areas: health and social services, education facilities and development capacity. In South Africa, this would fulfil outcomes of the National Development Plan’s Vision 2030, such as addressing the question of quality education, developing skills and, ultimately, creating a surge of economic growth in South Africa and on the rest of the continent.Facebook to bring Internet from space to Sub-Saharan Africa in 2016 http://t.co/PBL9bxEPV1 pic.twitter.com/gGIRWf4Qnk— RT (@RT_com) October 6, 2015Toby Shapshak, a technology trends expert, told ENCA news yesterday that satellites offered the best option for African internet access. “Satellites are the most rugged and reliable method to supply internet, but also the most expensive,” he said. Facebook’s investment in the project was both pioneering and momentous on a global level, he added.Facebook had just skipped ahead, over existing landline and cellular infrastructure, Shapshak explained, and had chosen to use satellites that would offer deregulated, unrestricted access. It would be unfettered by any laws of the countries it would service, offering a freer internet, while giving users fast and reliable internet access.While the idea might seem a little “pie in the sky”, he added, satellite technology was a proven method for connectivity – notably with conventional global telecommunications that had existed for more than 50 years. Industrial and global corporations present in Africa have been small-scale satellite internet connectivity for over five years, with the large costs involved making it impossible to roll out on a larger scale.With the Facebook investment, though, the idea of bringing fast, reliable and cost-effective broadband internet to Africa is slowly becoming a reality.“More places in Africa and South Africa that previously, due to a lack of infrastructure, could not get regular, effective internet access, will now have the opportunity to get it,” Shapshak said.He said Facebook’s move into internet service provision was a “bold and adventurous” one, a move that would spur the local and international service provider business into rethinking their own game of providing better internet services.Full interview with Toby Shapshak on ENCASource: News24Wirelast_img read more

Japanese student found dead at IIT-Guwahati

first_imgA Japanese student on an exchange programme at IIT-Guwahati has been found dead inside a hostel room, police said. The body of the student, identified as that of Kota Onoda (22) was found hanging from the ventilator of a bathroom in Lohit hostel at 3.30 p.m. on Thursday, a spokesperson of IIT-Guwahati said. After receiving information, a police team reached the spot and recovered the body. The body has been sent for post-mortem examination to Gauhati Medical College and Hospital and the Japanese Embassy in New Delhi has been informed about it, the spokesperson said. Onoda, a masters programme student at Gifu University in Japan, was doing internship in the Bio-Sciences and Bio- Engineering department of IIT-Guwahati for a semester, as part of the exchange programme. His internship was scheduled to end on November 30. A delegation of Gifu University that was in Guwahati on Thursday and the Ministry of External Affairs were also informed by the IIT authorities about the incident. Assistance for overcoming suicidal thoughts is available on the State’s health helpline 104 and Sneha’s suicide prevention helpline 044-24640050.last_img read more