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Donald Sidney Hock

first_imgDonald Sidney Hock, age 74 of Osgood, Indiana (formerly of Kalkaska, Michigan), passed away on Friday, May 10, 2019.  The son of Donald and Bernice (nee: Gryes) Hock was born on October 12, 1944 in Dearborn, Michigan.Donald loved to spend time flying model airplanes, helicopters and drones.  He was a big baseball and football fan and of course, the Detroit Lions and Detroit Tigers were his favorite teams to watch.  He was also a Brady fan because of the Michigan connection so the Patriots were ok in his book too.He is survived by his wife Darlene Ann (nee: Granholm) Hock of Osgood; his daughter Tracy and husband Bruce Roe, their children Chelsea Moore (Scott), Joshua Roe and their grandchildren children Skye & Raine in addition to his son Scott Hock and his children, Justin, Jacob and Josh; and his only sister Eva Brittain of Detroit, Michigan.A Celebration of Life will be on Sunday, May 19, 2019 from 4pm – 6pm at Abor Grove Village Chapel 1021 E. Central Avenue, Greensburg, IN 47240.last_img read more

Easy Street: captain back from ACL tear

first_imgSenior Ben Street has returned from an ACL tear and leads the team with 33 shots on goal this year.[/media-credit]Ben Street doesn’t get too upset about things. His coach sees him as a calming presence, and Street even admits he doesn’t tend to be overly emotional. Even season-ending injuries can’t derail him.Street is a fifth-year senior on the Wisconsin men’s hockey team, but only because he suffered a season-ending ACL tear just four games into the 2008-09 season. Characteristically, Street took the injury with calm acceptance.“It was just one of those things where I was pretty sure my season was over,” he said. “The only thing on my mind was how I was going to get myself back and ready to go the next year.”Now that he’s back, the UW tri-captain is doing what he does best — shooting the puck. Street scored a game-clinching goal with just under two minutes left Friday night and leads the team with 33 shots on goal. Although it’s early in the season, the forward is content with how he’s played so far.“Pretty good, I obviously had to get a little rust off to start with. I think in some aspects, I’m still getting my timing back a little bit,” Street said. “But so far I’ve been able to contribute every once in a while and I haven’t been making a lot of mistakes defensively, so at least I’m not hurting the team.”The loss of Street last year meant the Badgers faced a big void in offense. Although players like Tom Gorowsky and John Mitchell picked up the scoring slack, Street’s contribution was sorely missed. Entering his fourth year, he had scored at least 10 goals in each of his first three full seasons.Coming off of the 2007-08 season, he had posted career bests with 13 goals and 17 assists. Street also led the team with four game-winning goals that season.And though his offensive presence was missed, head coach Mike Eaves didn’t understate how Street’s calm demeanor and experience were missed. He even went as far as to compare the senior to a four-time Stanley Cup winner.“It’s interesting, when you talk to older guys in the National Hockey League, when people talk about a captain like (Detroit Red Wings defenseman Nicklas) Lidstrom, they talk about how calm he is,” Eaves said. “And during a storm, [he says] ‘Hey, it’s OK, we’re a good team, things are going to be all right. We’ve got to continue to work hard and stay the course.’“And that’s the kind of personality Ben has anyways, and with his experiences, he brings that.”When Street went down, co-captain Blake Geoffrion and the two assistant captains stepped up to provide on-ice leadership. But Geoffrion said he didn’t feel any additional pressure to lead, as Street was still active with the team.“He was around, getting to know the freshmen, getting to know [guys], closer to guys that weren’t playing as much and being able to talk to him and help them through their adversity,” Geoffrion said. “It was definitely helpful.”And though he wasn’t on the ice with the team, Street made himself available to his teammates to talk. He also watched games as a spectator and said he learned a lot being able to break down the play from above.With Geoffrion and Co. taking care of things in the rink, Street could focus on his rehab and being a mentor.“So I kind of let those guys take the game by game stuff, [and] I tried to just be an outlet, be an away from hockey type of thing,” Street said. “I kind of had a bird’s-eye view of the games, so guys could come and ask me, ‘What’d you think, maybe coach saw it this way, but what do you think?’”Despite accepting his new role on the team and feeling confident about his rehab, even the ever-placid Street admitted the injury was mentally taxing.“I mean, it was — probably frustrating is be best word. It was one of those things where there’s not much you can do about it, I couldn’t play, I kind of accepted that pretty early,” he said. “It was tough, watching your teammates go out there and compete and not being able to help them. That part was frustrating.”Adding to the frustration, the Badgers missed the NCAA tournament by just 0.0002 of a point in the Ratings Percentage Index. The Badgers also lost 10 games last season by one goal — or about one game for each goal Street has averaged per season.But having the forward back for a fifth year can only help on a largely veteran squad.“We kind of have the same fold as he did when it was ’06 and they won the national championship, and that’s kind of what we’ve got now,” Geoffrion said. “He’s been able to help us through and give us different ideas of what their team and their culture was when they won in ’06.”And though Street’s production so far this season has been pedestrian — his three points (two goals, one assist) are tied for 11th on the team — he leads the team in shots on goal and is a respectable plus-2 for the season. His coach calls him “a shooter” and acknowledges how tough it is to return from injury. And after knowing Street for more than four years, Eaves is confident he’ll see a return to form.“It’s always tough to come back after a long layoff. And I know Ben’s somewhat frustrated in his point production, but as we’ve talked about, it’s going to take time,” Eaves said. “He’s getting shots, he’s getting chances — he’s clearly getting chances.“It’s just a matter of time. His best is yet to come, that’s for sure. That’s exciting.”last_img read more

Syracuse leaves ‘a lot of meat on the bone’ in 41-6 loss to No. 1 Clemson

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 14, 2019 at 11:20 pm Contact Andrew: aegraham@syr.edu | @A_E_Graham The near-record Carrier Dome crowd roared, adding to the chaos of what just unfolded. Syracuse had the swing it needed early in the third quarter: Offense on the field, goal-to-go from the Clemson 9-yard line after a Chris Fredrick interception and return. With a touchdown, the Orange could cut Clemson’s tenuous lead to four.  Tommy DeVito took the snap, left the pocket to his right like so many plays before and fired down the sideline. Where he expected a receiver, the ball found Clemson’s Mario Goodrich. As DeVito convened with his teammates on the sideline following another of SU’s best chances — and one more wasted — to score a touchdown, he told them, “That’s on me,” while pointing at the “13” on his chest.That two-play sequence served as the microcosm of Syracuse’s (1-2, 0-1 Atlantic Coast) 41-6 loss against No. 1 Clemson (3-0, 2-0) in the Carrier Dome on Saturday night. The Tigers uncharacteristically gave the Orange chance after chance to stay in the game, almost daring another upset bid. But every time SU had a chance to punch in a touchdown, to close the gap on Clemson — to show it was closing the gap on Clemson’s program — the Orange were repeatedly beaten by their own mistakes. “We left a lot of meat on the bone out there,” head coach Dino Babers said. “There were some balls that went through some people’s hands and some decisions that you wish you had back. And when you’re playing against somebody that hasn’t lost a bunch of games, you have to get ahead of them.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textMax Freund | Staff PhotographerTwo years ago on the same field, a seismic college football event occurred. Syracuse didn’t finish the season strong, but on the night of Oct. 13, 2017, SU took its biggest step from doormat to contender under Babers. It showed the world Syracuse was changing for the better and more wins would come. A week after getting blown away by Maryland, the Orange were saddled with the unenviable task of proving its worth against a team that Babers said could be the best of its era. Despite surrendering 17 points by halftime, SU largely held Clemson’s potent offense in check, limited Travis Etienne and squeezed just enough out of the offense to think in the second half, the Orange could finally turn red zone chances into touchdowns.But the warning signs of a blowout were evident, too. DeVito rarely had enough, if any, time in the pocket. He was sacked six times in the first half. On one play in the first quarter, DeVito managed to finagle his way from a collapsing pocket and roll out to his right, eventually getting dragged down by Isaiah Simmons. The offensive line was still called for holding on the play. Even when DeVito threw into open windows, his receivers struggled. Taj Harris dropped a crossing route for a first down on SU’s opening driving, forcing a punt instead. At the end of the first quarter, DeVito ripped a long ball to the end zone that dropped through Trishton Jackson’s outstretched hands. A flag would’ve negated the play but the drop still elicited an exasperated “Oh” from a raucous crowd.Four times the Orange reached the red zone and four times it failed to score a touchdown. In the first half, while SU hovered within a couple scores of the Tigers, Babers twice opted to kick field goals in the red zone. “My thinking was, based off of who we’re playing, based off the down and distances, based off of where we’re at, let’s take the points,” Babers said. “Defense is playing well, let’s get the game to the second half. And I’m sure there will be opportunities in the second half if we need them.”Max Freund | Staff PhotographerBabers was right. Twice more, SU ended up inside the Clemson 10-yard line, both courtesy of Trevor Lawrence interceptions. The first was Fredrick’s. The second came late in the third quarter as Lawrence stared down Trill Williams before throwing the ball right to him. Williams returned the interception to the Clemson 3-yard line, juking Lawrence in the process. The Carrier Dome erupted in cheers, 50,248 orange-clad fans springing to their feet. Three straight rushes followed — two handoffs and a snuffed-out bootleg — setting up a 4th-and-goal that Babers deemed worthy. As DeVito opted to not throw the wheel route to Abdul Adams and cut upfield into a thicket of bodies, the first-year starter was swallowed up by Clemson’s defensive line. Two interceptions left Syracuse with two short fields — three and nine yards, respectively — and both times, SU failed to score a single point. Clemson scored touchdowns on both ensuing drives, stretching the score to three possessions.DeVito took some of the blame for the Orange’s struggles, saying that he’s “just trying to be the best leader possible and try to move the offense down the field.” And while he did throw a pick, four missed touchdown attempts from inside the 20 is not solely the quarterback’s, or anyone’s, entire responsibility. Regardless, it cost Syracuse. Max Freund | Staff PhotographerIn 2017, just not getting blown out was enough to show improvement. Instead, the Orange pulled a shocking upset. In 2019, two years and one glorious, 10-win season removed from that upset, covering the spread wasn’t enough anymore. Syracuse had a chance to show that 2018 wasn’t a fluke, but the new normal. For two and a half quarters, it succeeded. The Orange may have done enough to prove they’re not a pushover, even if the missed chances left a bitter taste. “I’m obviously a little disappointed on the point production,” Babers said. “We had the ball on the three-yard line, we ran it in there two times, and we hardly got anything. You want to get mad.”  As Babers emerged from the tunnel just before kick off, his team trailing behind him, he paused and stood at the threshold of Ernie Davis Legends Field. The fourth-year head coach turned and examined the whole arena, acknowledging the sold-out crowd revving up for the biggest game in Syracuse in 20 years. It was everything he’d hoped to build, everything he laid out in his introductory press conference speech — where he asked those in attendance to close their eyes — that boomed over the loudspeakers. Babers basked in the noise before taking the field. Except Saturday, the eyes were open, and they were on the Orange.SU stood in and held up as long as it could. But eventually, when it really mattered, Syracuse blinked. Commentslast_img read more