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[Right Against Exploitation] Allahabad HC Asks UP Govt Why RTE Instructors Are Paid Less Than Peon, Etc. [Read Order]

first_imgNews Updates[Right Against Exploitation] Allahabad HC Asks UP Govt Why RTE Instructors Are Paid Less Than Peon, Etc. [Read Order] LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK12 Sep 2020 12:37 AMShare This – xThe Allahabad High Court on Tuesday asked the UP Government to file a reply affidavit in a plea alleging that primary school teachers, recruited under the Right to Education Act, were paid less than Class IV posts, i.e. peon, etc. The Bench of Justice Pankaj Bhatia has asked the concerned authorities to file their counter affidavits within three weeks. In the interim, it…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Allahabad High Court on Tuesday asked the UP Government to file a reply affidavit in a plea alleging that primary school teachers, recruited under the Right to Education Act, were paid less than Class IV posts, i.e. peon, etc. The Bench of Justice Pankaj Bhatia has asked the concerned authorities to file their counter affidavits within three weeks. In the interim, it is instructed that teachers shall be paid honorarium in terms of the guidelines set by the Central Government. The order was passed during hearing of a plea against non-renewal of Petitioners’ contract to continue their positions. While the Court observed that this aspect of the matter “requires consideration”, it took note of the Petitioners’ submission that that the appointment of the teachers at an honorarium of Rs. 7,000/- per month clearly violates the mandate of Article 23, right against exploitation. It was argued that Rs. 7,000/- does not even meet the “minimum standard” prescribed even for labourers and thus, keeping qualified teachers at the said amount was nothing but an exploitation by the State. Reliance was placed on a single-bench Judgment of the High Court in Anurag & Anr. v. Union of India & Ors. (2018), whereby it was held that the guidelines as prescribed by the Central Government for payment of as Rs. 17,000/- should be a “guiding factor”. In view of these submissions, the Court ordered thus: “an interim mandamus is issued directing that the petitioners shall be permitted to continue as instructors in terms of Government Order dated 31.01.2013 till the pendency of writ petition and shall be paid their honorarium in terms of the Government Order. The question of exploitation by the State and quantum of honorarium to which the petitioners are entitled shall be considered on the next date.” So far as non-renewal of their contracts is concerned, the Court said, “As an interim measure, as there is no provision for non-renewal of appointed persons merely because the strength has fallen below 100, the operation and effect of the order dated 27.02.2020 is stayed and an interim mandamus is issued directing that the petitioners shall be permitted to continue as instructors in terms of Government Order dated 31.01.2013 till the pendency of writ petition.” Case Details: Case Title: Prabhu Shanker & Ors. v. State of UP & Ors. Case No.: Writ A No. 6356/2020 Quorum: Justice Pankaj Bhatia Click Here To Download Order Read Order Next Storylast_img read more

Among the missing

first_imgChildren go missing left and right in Sarah Braunstein’s haunting first novel.“She loved Crackerjack. She loved the home team with all her heart,” writes Braunstein, a fiction instructor at Harvard Extension School. “She was twelve; her name was Leonora; she would disappear.”In college, Braunstein overheard a story about a family that “perished at a train crossing — only one child survived,” she recalled. And the idea for “The Sweet Relief of Missing Children” was born.“To make sense of the tragedy, I began to fashion a story — my story was one of maternal fear, longing, and erotic abandon. As I cobbled it together, I became fascinated with runaways, with teenagers who flee to urban landscapes, hungry for newness,” said Braunstein, who was also inspired by Sherwood Anderson’s “Winesburg, Ohio,” and by the writing of Flannery O’Connor, Joy Williams, Denis Johnson, and Gina Berriault. (“These writers find in the everyday horror and gorgeousness — and find in their characters both darkness and heroism.”)“During this period, I saw an exhibit of Jim Goldberg’s photographs of street kids at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. I also came upon a Life magazine from 1967 featuring images of ragged, darkly glamorous teen runaways and their worried parents. I became interested in exploring the psychological experience of those who flee, and those who are left behind.”Last October, Braunstein was selected by the National Book Foundation as one of “5 under 35” for 2010, and before that she was recognized by the prestigious Rona Jaffe Foundation. And like her characters, whose lives are continuously upended, Braunstein’s life might’ve taken another route.“I grew up in a suburb of Hartford, Conn. — insurance capital of the world. My parents and stepparents at one time all worked in the insurance industry. They were always very supportive of my impulse to write, which arose early,” she said.“They often told me that Wallace Stevens had worked in insurance — at their very company. Insurance people have a reputation for conservatism — not the sorts of people who would encourage a child to pursue something as uncertain as the arts. But in a funny way Stevens’ legend paved the way for me to write.”Braunstein wrote her first story in elementary school. “It was called ‘Shining Eyes’ — a suburban Gothic in which a plucky adolescent heroine explores the abandoned house at the end of the street, only to see a pair of eyes shining in the shadows. She recognizes them: Her school principal!”“Sweet Relief” likewise tortures the reader with its beauty and unrest. Braunstein’s characters are mostly children, and though their fates are uncertain, it’s her adult characters that are doubly worrying. There’s Goldie, the desperate husband-obsessed mother, and Thomas, an employee at an abortion clinic who moonlights as a peeping Tom.Braunstein, an alumna of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, said she is working on “a second novel and a collection on essays. And some short stories.” On top of writing and teaching, she is also a mother herself.“I wrote most of this book before I was a mother, but becoming a mother of course gave me more insight into the profound love and terror of parenthood, the great challenges of the endeavor. And it reminded me again — though I’m not sure we ever really need reminding — of the vulnerability of childhood,” she said.“But maybe what it comes down to is this: Our children instill greater empathy in us. And empathy is the novelist’s most important tool.”last_img read more

Two homes, one title, endless opportunities

first_imgThis dual living property is for sale at 16 Weston Court, Bellbird Park.When Kathryn and Marcus Backway built this dual-living investment property two years ago, they knew they were on to a sure thing.The property at 16 Weston Crt, Bellbird Park, has never been empty and currently generates a solid rental return of $520 a week.One of the kitchens at 16 Weston Court, Bellbird Park.It’s two homes on one 402 sqm title — a three-bedroom, two-bathroom house and a one-bedroom, one-bathroom home.“We knew dual living was the way of the future,” Mrs Backway said.“You could put a family in one side and elderly parents in the other, or a young family could live in one home and rent the other one out to help pay the mortgage.”More from newsDigital inspection tool proves a property boon for REA website3 Apr 2020The Camira homestead where kids roamed free28 May 2019The living room at the larger house at 16 Weston Court, Bellbird Park.Each home is currently rented out to separate parties.Mrs Backway said the couple were selling to pursue other investment opportunities interstate.Tucked away at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac, the property is in a high growth corridor with infrastructure close by, ensuring a solid investment.One of the bedrooms at 16 Weston Court, Bellbird Park.Inside, the homes feature a modern design with tiled, open plan living areas, carpeted bedrooms, separate entrances and fenced yards.Both kitchens feature stone bench tops and stainless steel appliances.Unlike some duplexes and townhouses, there are no body corporate fees.One of the bathrooms at 16 Weston Court, Bellbird Park.The property is also lower maintenance than owning two separate rental properties.Mrs Backway said the majority of inquiries had so far come from investors, who recognised the growing appetite for dual living as the population aged and downsizing became more popular.“I think it will only continue to grow as the demographics change,” she said.last_img read more