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Takeaways: Joe Pavelski is giving Sharks’ GM a lot to think about

first_imgSAN JOSE — The rematch ended up being a replay of the first game in reverse.After the St. Louis Blues (7-8-3) handed the Sharks (11-7-3, 25 points) their worst defeat of the season last week, the guys flipped the tables at SAP Center Saturday, putting together their best-defensive performance of the season in a 4-0 win.“It was a good answer back, showed that we’re for real,” goalie Aaron Dell said. “Send a message to them that that’s not going to happen every time they play us.”Erik Karlsson …last_img read more

Nation Brand Forum speaker profile: Martyn Davies

first_imgSouth Africa has as many global companies as South Korea, but the world doesn’t know this, says Martyn Davies. For South Africa to be recognised as a global business leader, he believes its people need to share the same national values. He will be speaking at Brand South Africa’s 2017 Nation Brand Forum on 5 October. Catch economic analyst, Martyn Davies, at the 2017 Nation Brand Forum being held at Summer Place, Johannesburg on 5 October. Davies will discuss ways of improving South Africa’s standing on the global economic stage. (Image: Shamin Chibba)A 2010 World Economic Forum (WEF) Young Global Leader, Dr Martyn Davies currently leads global firm Deloitte’s Emerging Markets and Africa division as well the Africa firm’s China and Japan Services Group.Davies has led the World Economic Forum’s Mining and Metal Industry Group and has been awarded a WEF Dangote Fellowship for young Africans, an honour bestowed to those who show outstanding leadership, professional accomplishments and commitment to society.He was previously ranked the number one analyst in South Africa in the Other African Economies and Markets category by the Financial Mail in its annual Analysts of the Year awards.Beyond working with a third of all companies listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange, he has advised governments including those of Botswana, Ghana, South Korea, the Netherlands, Norway, the UK and South Africa.Davies completed his PhD at Wits University and went on to study in South Korea, Harvard and Oxford universities. He is a visiting professor at IE Business School, Madrid, Spain. He believes that South Africa does not get the credit for its business acumen, and has often pointed out that the country has created a similar number of globally competitive corporations as South Korea, a country hailed for its economic miracle.He believes that until South Africans begin to see the bigger picture and understand and embrace its role in the world, the country will not fulfill its potential. “We need to forge a nation and we are not doing enough to forge a nation state…I think that one of the negatives of South Africa is that we still need to see similar, true values – political, national values – being created and instilled in people for us to truly progress as a nation.”Married, with three children, he was awarded national colours in cycling for South African Universities. An avid reader, Davies himself has published articles in accredited journals, including Asian Economic Policy Review, the Review of African Political Economy, and the South African Journal of International Affairs. He has been a commentator for the Financial Times and The Washington Post, BBC, Al Jazeera and AFP.last_img read more

An Architect, an Arch, and Passive House Performance

first_imgConsiderable attention has been lavished on Crossway, a high-performance home designed by British architect Richard Hawkes and completed a couple years ago on a spacious lot in county Kent, in southeast England. It wasn’t until July of this year, however, that the house, which has become as well known for its parabolic roof as its energy efficiency, was finally certified for Passive House performance, becoming one of the first new homes in the country to meet the standard.Hawkes, who tracked the project’s progress in a blog, and his wife, Sophie, occupied the four-bedroom 3,000-sq.-ft. house for about a year before hiring a service in February to perform a blower-door test, which showed 0.56 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals. Later that month, the house also earned an A-A rating, the highest achievable, for energy efficiency and CO2 emissions in government-mandated Energy Performance Certificate tests, with a 93% energy efficiency score, and 103 out of 103 points on the “environmental impact” CO2-emissions rating.Adding a thermal bufferOther than the parabolic roof – a Catalan vault constructed of 26,000 locally made clay tiles arranged in three layers – the house is equipped with a combined photovoltaic and solar thermal system and phase-change material thermal store, with a 4 kW heat register linked to the building’s heat recovery ventilation system. A biomass boiler has been installed as backup, but has yet to be used.For the exterior walls, in between their cellulose insulation and interior-facing layer of plasterboard, Hawkes installed 5mm-thick DuPont Energain panels, which are designed to absorb ambient heat as room temperature rises (starting at about 72 degrees), store it until the temperature drops (at around 64 degrees), and then release it back into the room.After some adjustments, the home’s energy efficiency systems seem to be performing as expected, Hawkes told the Scottish Passive House Centre (SPHC), a consultancy and certification group serving the U.K. He added that the house has had 100% free hot water since March and its PV/solar thermal system has generated almost 700 kWh of electricity since the end of June. SPHC handled the building’s Passive House certification, which was awarded on July 10.Clay soil and the greening of a roofThough the region’s clay soil is terrific material for tile and brick, it did mean that the builder had to sink a series of 36-ft. pilings into the ground to guarantee stability for the foundation. The clay also is doing duty as a native-plant substrate in a center channel built into roof’s porous tiles, which were dressed with metal mesh and then filled with gravel and clay. With the support of an inexpensive irrigation system, grasses and flowers have finally taken root.None of this came cheaply. Although we haven’t gotten word on the final cost of construction and materials, estimates were mentioned in an overview of the project for “Grand Designs,” a TV series presented by Britain’s Channel 4 Television that focuses on architecturally unusual residential construction projects. The initial budget of about $473,000 for Crossway grew to $630,700 as the project got underway, and the cost of the parabolic roof, originally pegged at $134,000, had drifted to about $165,000.Judging from Hawkes’ comments about the results, though, it doesn’t seem as if he or his wife have regrets about the endeavor, and the attention it has attracted probably hasn’t hurt either.last_img read more

Why Twitter’s IPO Doesn’t Change Anything

first_imgThe Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos owen thomas Related Posts Twitter has filed papers to take the company public. This changes everything, right?Wrong.It’s a momentous milestone for the six-year-old message-broadcasting company, to be sure, and a credit to the steady leadership of CEO Dick Costolo, who followed two of the company’s founders in that role. But for users and developers, the IPO doesn’t mean much.Change Is Good—But Simplicity Is BetterAs a product, Twitter won’t change much following a public stock offering. The 140-character format of a tweet is set in stone, though Twitter has figured out clever ways to associate images, videos, and other forms of media with these short posts. Recent changes, like a more intelligent display of tweets sent as replies in the form of a conversation, seem more like obvious tweaks than big changes.And while Twitter has grown more sophisticated in selling advertisements, ads on Twitter come in the form of tweets, albeit more prominently displayed, which keeps things simple. Where Twitter will improve its advertising products is in how they’re targeted to particular users—for example, in conjunction with live events and television shows.The Platform Is Already Locked DownAh, but won’t Twitter crack down on developers after an IPO, as it looks for new ways to make money? Well, that’s already happened.While third-party apps for reading tweets face severe restrictions, developers are relatively free to build apps that send content into the Twittersphere. Analytics toolmakers also are making a mint.Some developers may still be unhappy that Twitter won’t let them create the apps they’re dreaming of, but the boundaries are better defined than they were in Twitter’s early days, giving less grounds for complaint.Twitter Will Keep Snapping Up StartupsRight before it revealed its SEC filing, Twitter announced it had bought online-advertising startup MoPub in an all-stock deal. It’s been on an acquisition spree for a while, buying up startups like Vine, the short-video broadcasting service, and Crashlytics, maker of tools for mobile-app developers.Between the cash Twitter has raised from investors and the high valuation placed on its privately traded shares, it already has the financial firepower to buy startups to expand its business and its pool of talent. An IPO will accelerate that trend, but it won’t change its direction.Investors Will Get RichTwitter’s venture-capital investors, like Union Square Ventures and Charles River Ventures, will profit enormously from an IPO (and from their patience in not selling). But it’s their job to make money for their own investors—pension funds and other large institutions that need to diversify their investment portfolios. While it’s great that VC firms are making money, it doesn’t really change much for the rest of us.Twitter Will Stay IndependentAs a publicly traded company, Twitter has a better chance of staying independent. But it got too big to buy a while ago, based on the valuation its private investors have assigned to it.Over the years, Facebook and Google made stabs at buying Twitter; there were talks with others, like Yahoo, that never went particularly far. That was billions of dollars ago. At this point, it’s too hard for Twitter to sell. Its private valuation is estimated at between $10 billion and $14 billion; it will likely be worth more than that as a public company.At the same time, that’s way too much money for any public company answerable to its shareholders to spend on an acquisition, given the state of Twitter’s advertising revenues. (Estimates vary in the range of $300 million to $600 million this year; we know that to file confidentially with the SEC as an emerging-growth company, Twitter’s annual revenues must be less than $1 billion.) If Twitter will sell, it must first grow into the valuation eager investors want to assign to it.What Will ChangeThe one factor that’s hardest for Costolo and the rest of Twitter’s executives to manage will be its people. AllThingsD reports that some Twitter employees recently received new stock grants to keep them at the company well past an IPO.Some engineers, product managers, and salespeople who enjoy the wild ride of a startup simply won’t want to stay at a company of the size a publicly traded Twitter will inevitably become. Were Twitter to find some way to delay its stock-market debut, they would likely leave anyway, as Twitter grew; that’s been happening for some time, even as Twitter hires employees by the hundreds.One thing to watch is Twitter’s defense of its users’ free speech against regulators and spies. The departure of longtime general counsel Alexander Macgillivray was disturbing to some, though he wrote that he “couldn’t be happier” with his replacement, Vijaya Gadde.If a public Twitter wavers in defense of its users against government agencies, employees could rapidly grow disillusioned. And that, in turn, could weaken the company’s growth.The good news is that going public may be the best defense Twitter has against such pressure. Acquired by a larger entity, Twitter might fold to protect some other aspect of the parent company’s business. As long as those who buy Twitter’s stock understand the legal risks it faces in championing free speech around the globe, little should change just because Twitter acquires a ticker symbol.Lead photo of Twitter CEO Dick Costolo by Madeleine Weiss for ReadWrite Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro…center_img Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Tags:#Alexander Macgillivray#Dick Costolo#IPO#twitter#Twitter IPO A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more