Tag Archives 上海贵人传媒

Funds flow to fix County’s water system

first_imgWhatsApp Email Linkedin Facebook Advertisement MORE than €3mn is to be spent in Co Limerick on replacing 23km of watermain to avoid water being lost through the current leaky system. It comes a week after the Limerick Post reported that the city council was to spend more than €5mn on replacing 19km of watermains. This week, Phil Hogan, Minister for the Environment, Community and Local Government, approved Limerick County Council’s proposals to carry out extensive rehabilitation works in the County at an estimated cost of €3.065mn.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Minister Hogan’s stated: “It is difficult to justify major capital expenditure on new water supply infrastructure unless we also tackle high unaccounted for water levels in the existing supply systems. I expect local authorities to commence mains rehabilitation and replacement works with a value of over €320mn nationwide.”The Council intends to carry out the work to replace 22.865km of watermain along with 624 associated new individual services.According to the Minister’s department, common backyard services will also be replaced in accordance with the relevant Departmental Circulars.The rehabilitation works will tackle pipes that are ranked poorly in regard to age, condition, burst history and that have experienced level of service problems.“The Council’s priorities for water mains rehabilitation are to enhance the water quality, prevent mains failure, identify service pipe defects, improve pressure and flow, reduce interruptions to supply and address leakage and operational serviceability,” a Department of Environment statement said.The Minister’s approval now allows Limerick County Council to prepare contract documents for its water conservation proposals with the view to seeking tenders and having the works commence as soon as possible.center_img Previous articleMcManus ‘embarrassed’ at latest honourNext articleCattle moved from farm under garda escort admin Print Twitter NewsLocal NewsFunds flow to fix County’s water systemBy admin – August 15, 2011 661 last_img read more

Inside ‘Golden State Killer’ suspect’s life in jail

first_imgJustin Sullivan/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Joseph DeAngelo, the suspected serial rapist and killer known as the “Golden State Killer,” was caught off guard when he was taken into custody at his California home on April 24, decades after his alleged crimes.DeAngelo, 72, was brought to Sacramento County Main Jail and is in a cell by himself due to the notoriety of case, a Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department investigator told ABC News.No one has visited him so far, according to jail records.DeAngelo, a former police officer, was placed on suicide watch as a precaution, the investigator said, and has also undergone a psychiatric evaluation.DeAngelo, who police say evaded investigators for decades, is believed by authorities to have committed 12 murders, at least 50 rapes and multiple home burglaries throughout California in the 1970s and 1980s. He was tracked down by DNA samples from distant family members.He appeared in court Friday and did not enter a plea. He returns to court May 14.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Kurtenbach: It’s a tricky, murky, and expensive (oh so expensive) path ahead for the Warriors

first_imgClick here if you’re unable to view the photo gallery on your mobile device. Related Articles The season is over, the Raptors are champions, and the Golden State Warriors have no choice but to head into the great unknown.After their performance this postseason, they can trudge forward with their heads held high.But that doesn’t make this summer any less daunting.center_img Warriors resemble team of old, Kevon Looney isn’t ready, and other thoughts from loss to Trail …last_img

Tree of Life in the Genes? Not Yet

first_imgNow that we have hundreds of animal genomes in the bank (the GenBank), is Darwin’s tree of life becoming visible?  If the image is present, it is extremely weak, said Michael J. Sanderson of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at University of Arizona.  Writing for Science,1 he showed that only a small fraction of genomes show even minimal support for a phylogenetic (evolutionary) tree.    His report was accompanied by a circle diagram with 876 taxonomic orders represented by small rectangles along the rim.  He shaded blue those that contained a minimal phylogenetic signal, and yellow those that did not.  The entire circle was almost all yellow.  One has to look hard for blue rectangles.  This is after “improvements in algorithms and high-performance computing technology have dramatically increased the scale of feasible phylogenetic inference; and unconventional sources of data, including whole genomes, expressed sequence tag libraries, and barcode sequences, have altered the landscape of large-scale phylogenetics with an infusion of new evidence.”  The distribution of species in GenBank (the database of gene sequences) is remarkably broad, he said.  If there was ever a time to see Darwin’s tree of life come to light in the genes, it should be now.    In light of the flood of evidence, how can the phylogenetic signal be so weak?  “Construction of a high-resolution phylogenetic tree containing all eukaryotic species in the database is a grand challenge that is substantially more tractable than inferring the entire tree of life, but to succeed, strategies will have to overcome serious sampling impediments,” he said.  “Quantifying the distribution and strength of phylogenetic evidence currently in the database is a prerequisite for this effort.”  So that’s what he set out to do.  And that’s what turned out to look pretty weak.    Sanderson looked at 1127 higher taxa for evidence of a phylogenetic signal.  He had to set his standards pretty low.  He figured if there were at least four operational taxonomic units [OTUs] that were similar between two taxa, for instance, then an evolutionary relationship could be inferred.  His choice of tree-building software also was rigged to produce a “fast but conservative” result.  “Any clade in the resulting tree will have had at least 50% bootstrap support in maximum parsimony ‘fast’ bootstrap analyses with two different sequence alignment algorithms,” he explained.2  “Although this protocol biases the confidence assessment slightly downward, the bias is small.”  Is that a matter of human opinion?    There were more hints the standards were loose.  “For comparative purposes and to aid in the visualization of results, an arbitrary cutoff value of 1.5 was selected as minimal phylogenetic support,” he continued.  “This is equivalent, for example, to the information content of two independent loci, each resolving three-quarters of clades to at least a bootstrap value of 51%.”  This sounds close to the tipping point for inferring no relationship at all.    After manipulating his protocols, summing, and averaging, the evolutionary signal came out surprisingly low, even with the loose standards.  Here is the upshot:Among individual OTUs [operational taxonomic units], Homo sapiens had the maximum support value of 293.9, but the distribution of scores had a long tail leading to 6402 OTUs with no support at all (most of which, 6079, simply were not found in any phylogenetically informative clusters).  The top 10 were all mammals; the top 25 were mammals, angiosperms (tomato, potato, tobacco, rice, and wheat), Drosophila melanogaster, and Drosophila simulans, all with support scores above 60 units.  Of the 171,703 OTUs for which scores were calculated, only 12% achieved minimal phylogenetic support.  The mean support was 0.84, less than the equivalent of each taxon being found in at least one well-resolved and -supported phylogenetic tree.So only 12% reached the already-low bar for evolutionary signal – that means 88% did not.  At the level of orders, the scores were skewed even lower.  The maximum score was 10 in primates, and 0.0 in 75 other orders.  He tried to draw an inference between orders that were species-rich and species poor, but many of the orders outside of primates and arthropods did not even reach minimal phylogenetic support regardless of species richness.    So what did Sanderson conclude from his investigation of the strength of the signal of Darwin’s tree of life in the genes?  Basically, he said more work is needed.  “An accurate high-resolution phylogeny will require substantial increases in sequence data to bring that score to a level comparable to that of the best-supported higher taxa.”  He thinks more data targeted at the right clusters of genes might help.  Better algorithms in the tree-building software might help, too.  Maybe the signal will become clearer when genes from undiscovered species in poorly-resolved branches become available.  “In the meantime, sampling protocols guided by quantitative assessments of the phylogenetic distribution of data will improve the efficiency of emerging phylogenomic strategies for building the tree of life of known organisms.”  Translated, this almost sounds like he is claiming that better data-massaging methods might just begin to help develop strategies for beginning to find ways to begin to visualize Darwin’s tree.  In colloquial terms, it’s going to take a lot of work to fix this picture.1.  Michael J. Sanderson, “Phylogenetic Signal in the Eukaryotic Tree of Life,” Science, 4 July 2008: Vol. 321. no. 5885, pp. 121-123, DOI: 10.1126/science.1154449.2.  For more on the meanings of bootstrap, maximum parsimony and other phylogenetic tree-building terms, see the entries from 04/26/2008, 01/26/2008, 03/30/2004, 10/15/2003, and 11/06/2002.Charlie’s hanging from his own tree.  Why give him more rope?  It will only make the carcass horizontal instead of vertical.(Visited 23 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Earth Uniqueness Up; SETI Down

first_imgOur earth seems special – maybe because it is.  Some astronomers are seriously considering that life might be rare or unique on our rare (or unique) planet.  If so, hopes for finding sentient aliens on the celestial radio dial drop accordingly.  The 50th anniversary of the first SETI search came, unfortunately for search enthusiasts, at a time when funding is harder to get. New Scientist has been running a series called “Existence” for the purpose of examining big questions about the origin of the universe, life, and consciousness.  Most of the articles try to give atheist answers to arguments of intelligent design.  In “Why is the universe just right for us?” for instance, Marcus Chown tried to explain away fine-tuning arguments with responses that physical constants might be interconnected, or are not as finely tuned as they seem, or that the multiverse hypothesis provides a way out.  Even so, he could not explain away the incredibly “fortuitous” dark energy parameter. In “Where did we come from?” Stephen Hawking presented the standard big bang scenario with inflation, but admitted at the end that “many huge mysteries remain,” leaving the solution in the future.  In “Why is there a universe?” Amanda Gefter tried to explain how something can come from nothing via quantum fluctuations.  MacGregor Campbell posted a cartoony animation trying to convince puzzled readers that “nothing” and “something” might be one and the same – i.e., that our physical universe, including us, might really be nothing.  At the end, though, Gefter realized this is not a satisfactory answer: None of this really gets us off the hook, however. Our understanding of creation relies on the validity of the laws of physics, particularly quantum uncertainty. But that implies that the laws of physics were somehow encoded into the fabric of our universe before it existed. How can physical laws exist outside of space and time and without a cause of their own? Or, to put it another way, why is there something rather than nothing? Readers of these articles might well ask how nothing could know anything. Live Science put forth a new idea by David Spiegel [Princeton U] and Edwin Turner [U of Tokyo] that allows for sentient life being so rare that we might be alone in the universe.  Using Bayesian analysis, they showed mathematically that there is no way to prefer the belief life is common over the belief life is rare, even using the famous Drake equation.  When you have only one data point, “Our own existence implies very little about how many other times life has arisen.”  Accordingly, it is just as scientifically reasonable to believe life is unique in the universe as to argue it must be common. In a Nature News article, M. Mitchell Waldrop announced royally, “SETI Is dead – Long live SETI.”  By that he meant that “The closure of the Allen Telescope Array shifts the search for extraterrestrial intelligence away from big science.”  California’s budget crisis has shut down hopes at the Hat Creek site to scan the skies for intelligent signals.  With that comes the graying of the true believers: The melancholy vista at Hat Creek makes it easy to entertain equally melancholy thoughts about the SETI enterprise itself. It’s the ultimate in high-risk, high-payoff science, pursued by only a handful of passionate researchers. In 50 years of searching, they have turned up nothing — and they can’t quite shake an association in the public mind with flying-saucer sightings and Hollywood science fiction, all of which is so easy for cost-cutting politicians to ridicule that any substantial federal funding for SETI is impossible. Private support for the search is getting tighter because of the global recession. And many of the pioneers who have championed the search are now well into their 60s, 70s or 80s. SETI Institute research head Jill Tarter remains optimistic, however, because smaller, cheaper searches are still continuing, and all searches over the past half century have only represented a tiny sample of space.  Bottom line, though, is that nothing has been found, and even the most optimistic proponents cannot provide any reasonable estimate of the chances of success, despite the self-reinforcing opinions of those whose reputations depend on high hopes (Space.com). It really is kind of sad to see weeds grow around the Allen Telescope Array, built, like one of the designers said, “in a time of irrational exuberance, [that] ended in the great recession.”  For one thing, it is sad to see any money wasted.  For another, it kept the SETI people busy on a project unlikely to succeed instead of employed in possibly more damaging work (like Darwin Party Enforcers).  And lastly, the SETI hype gave us a lot of material for Stupid Evolution Quotes of the Week.  SETI is dead; SET your I on ID.(Visited 46 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Dow Drops Its Line of Solar Shingles

first_imgA time of change for DowThe announcement comes as Dow Chemical prepares for a merger with DuPont and as it takes full control of Dow Corning. Dow announced in late June it was cutting 2,500 jobs globally, about 4% of its total workforce.Dow Solar employs about 130 workers in Midland, Michigan, and Milpitas, California. Most of those positions will be affected by the cutbacks.Powerhouse shingles were launched in 2011. At the time, the company said the single was “integral to Dow’s transformation, and a key part of its strategy to invent and innovate new technologies.” The Solar System 2.0, first released last year, was the latest version of the shingle with better power density and easier installation, according to Dow.CertainTeed continues to make a roofing shingle with an integral solar collector, the Apollo II PV Roofing System. Unlike Dow’s Powerhouse, it uses mono-crystalline silicon cell. The 60-watt modules weigh less than 3 pounds per square foot and have a wind rating of up to 150 mph. Dow Chemical is giving up on its line of building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) roofing shingles.Less than five years after entering the market, the company says it will accept orders for the Powerhouse Solar System only through July 28 and make its last shipments by August 10, MLive reported.A Dow spokesperson said in an email that the company planned to “transition its Powerhouse platform to a licensing business model.”The solar shingles are manufactured with flexible solar cells made with copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) produced by NuvoSun, a wholly owned subsidiary acquired by Dow in 2013. As Greentech Media notes, NuvoSun is one of many companies that have ventured into CIGS technology with hopes it would be an efficient, less obtrusive, and lower-cost alternative to conventional crystalline silicon solar panels.That hasn’t quite worked out. The shingles have a low profile, but the thin-film CIGS cells aren’t as efficient at generating electricity as standard solar modules, and they’re difficult to manufacture. In the end, investing in building-integrated solar “amounts to paying a premium for less of a return,” as Greentech Media’s Julian Spector put it.Pricing information posted at the Dow website seems to bear that out. The company says that if a typical residential roof using conventional materials costs $10,000, the same roof incorporating enough Powerhouse shingles to generate 3 kilowatts of electricity would be $25,000, after federal and utility incentives.At $3.50 per watt, standard PV modules rated at 3 kW would cost $10,500 installed, before the 30% federal tax credit.last_img read more

10 Enemies of Productivity

first_imgNo Goals: You need a target. Without a target, there is nothing to aim for. Without goals, you are simply drifting, reacting to whatever acts on you. Goals are what allow you to be proactive and take initiative. Without goals, you can be very busy without being productive.No Plan: A well thought-out, written plan is the map that guides your actions. Without a plan to reach your goals, the actions you take won’t get you where you want to go.No Master List: A yellow legal pad might be the right tool to track all of the many things that come into your life, but it’s not likely. You need a master list of every project, every task, and every piece of incoming information you need to take action on. Without this list, commitments are lost, and so is your productivity.No Weekly Review: Once a week (at minimum), you have to spend the time evaluating your priorities and adjusting your plans. Without spending time reviewing your priorities and making adjustments to your calendar, you can’t make progress on your most important priorities. In fact, you won’t even know what your priorities are.No Time Blocking: Part of a good weekly review is blocking the time you need to take action on your most important priorities. If you don’t take time to plan your week, then others will plan your week for you.Over-committed: Busy people get more done. Over-committed people get the wrong things done. Focus is saying no to all but the few things that really matter. Being overcommitted is to pretend that everything matters and all the choices of what to do with your limited time are equal. Commit to doing more work, but only the work that  matters.Under-committed: This isn’t having too little to do, even though that is possible. It’s not being committed enough to your goals, your dreams, and your priorities. If you want to live a productive life, you must have a fire in your belly.Procrastination: Being productive means taking action on what matters most. You procrastinate when you know what you need to do but aren’t inspired enough to take action or aren’t disciplined enough to do the work that is necessary. When you are committed to meaningful goals, even the rote actions get done.Burnout: Being productive is only sustainable when you take time away from doing the work to refresh, reset, and recharge. The more you do, the more you need time to recover. Burnout comes when you don’t take care of the only real asset through which you produce results: You.Inability to Say No: Saying no to small things is how you preserve your time for big things. Without the ability to say no, other people’s priorities will crowd out your real priorities. Being productive requires that you say no far more than you say yes. These are productivity’s ten enemies: Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

1st or 2nd Best Middle Blocker ‘doesn’t matter’ for Oliver Almadro, title-seeking Ateneo

first_imgUST legend Venus Bernal proud of Sisi Rondina, feels it’s the Tigresses’ year Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Almadro said that he explained it to Madayag and that his graduating middle blocker understood what happened.“First or second Best Middle Blocker, it doesn’t matter. At least, we got one and that’s what we’re thankful for that one of our players were still recognized,” said Almadro Saturday just before the start of Game 1 of the UAAP Finals between University of Santo Tomas and Ateneo.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsAteneo fans cried foul after Doria was given the higher nod than Madayag after a couple of sports reporters, who cover the UAAP questioned the awarding process.Doria was second in blocking with an average of 0.69 blocks per set or a total of 37 kill blocks but it was Madayag who led the league, numbers-wise, with 0.86 kill blocks per frame and a total of 44 kill blocks. Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue Almadro said it’s not a big deal for them if Madayag was the first or second since they’re more concerned with the championship than with anything else.“It’s not a big deal, the important thing for us is the championship,” said Almadro, whose Lady Eagles are searching for their first title since 2015.“What we want is to become the champion. If there’s an award on our side, then, that’s just a bonus.”ADVERTISEMENT Panelo: Duterte ‘angry’ with SEA Games hosting hassles LATEST STORIES Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Hontiveros presses for security audit of national power gridcenter_img Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ Philippine Arena Interchange inaugurated DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Ateneo coach Oliver Almadro. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—Ateneo head coach Oliver Almadro cleared the air following the unwarranted controversy surrounding this season’s individual awards.National University’s Roselyn Doria was named the first Best Middle Blocker while the Lady Eagles’ Maddie Madayag took home the second Best Middle Blocker plum of the UAAP Season 81 women’s volleyball tournament.ADVERTISEMENT Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte View commentslast_img read more

Belgium coach on Japan’s heartbreak: ‘That’s what happens in the World Cup’

first_imgBelgium coach Roberto Martinez praised Japan for their brave display against Belgium in Rostov-On-Do in the Round of 16 clash.However, he went onto add that heartbreaks are a part of game and this is what World Cup football is all about.The Red Devils, who were down by two goals, came from behind to equalise twice before finally landing the hammer blow in the 94th minute of the match to knock Japan out and set up a quarter-final clash against Brazil on July 6.He had only good things to say about the Blue Samurais but also added that his players were strong and their desire to get back in the game says a lot about the bunch of players.2018 FIFA WORLD CUP: FULL COVERAGE”Well, that’s what happens in the World Cup. You have to congratulate Japan, they played the perfect game. They were so solid, they frustrated us, then they were clinical on the counter,” said Martinez”And it was a test of the team. The reaction of everyone wanting to get back in the game. To win the game tells you everything about this group of players,” he added. Belgium were two goals down but came from behind to beat Japan 3-2 (Reuters Photo)Belgium overcome brave Japan to reach quarter-finalsThe Spaniard also praised his team for showing the winning mentality after going two goals down within a matter of four minutes at the Rostov Arena.”No negative things, believe me. Today was about going through, and we did that. Today was a day to be proud of this group of players. Keep believing. These players can. In the World Cup sometimes you want to be perfect. Football is about winning and the boys showed an incredible winning mentality today,” said the former Everton manager.advertisementBelgium, who were two goals down, got level with two headed goals from Jan Vertonghen and Marouane Fellaini in the 69th and 74th minute of the match before a lightning quick counter-attack in the 93rd minute of the match from a Japan corner completely exposed the Japanese defence. Keisuke Honda took a corner in the 93rd minute with most Japanese players up attacking but the ball went straight to Thibaut Courtois and he released Kevin De Bruyne straight away. The Manchester City midfielder ran through the Japanese players before passing it his Thomas Muenier on the right, who put it straight across the face of the goal and Romelu Lukaku cleverly sold a dummy to the Japan keeper and defenders, allowing Nacer Chadli a free hit at the goal as the goalie looked to get in the line of the ball. Eiji Kawashima didn’t succeed and the ball rattled the back of the net to complete a historic comeback and left the Japanese heartbroken in Rostov.Belgium equal a 48-year-old record: Stats and factsThe distraught Japanese, who went 2-0 up with goals by Genki Haraguchi and Takashi Inui early in the second half, fell to the turf after Chadli poked the ball home from Meunier’s cross four minutes into added time at the Rostov Arena. Nacer Chadli scored in the 94th minute of the match (AP Photo)Speaking about Japan’s decision to commit so many men forward in the dying minutes of the match and risking a goal in the process, Japan coach Akira Nishino said: “We wanted to finish the match, to win the match. And at that point I thought we might go into extra time. However we did not really expect that kind of super counter attack, and my players didn’tt expect within a few seconds, for the ball to be carried into our half. And that really decided the match.”One of the most exciting teams of the group phase, Belgium faced an embarrassing exit but finally clicked to become the first team to win a World Cup knockout game from two goals down since West Germany beat England 3-2 after extra time in 1970.Belgium’s ‘golden generation’ have now scored 12 goals in four games in Russia ahead of a mouthwatering last eight clash with Brazil who beat Mexico 2-0 earlier on Monday.last_img read more