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Mayor’s Message: Oct. 12

first_imgDear Friends,City Council last night approved four planning documents related to our flood mitigation and outreach efforts. These are requirements for the National Flood Insurance Program’s Community Rating System (CRS). Ocean City will be reviewed by the CRS program in December. We anticipate increasing our rating by one level and possibly two. That would mean an additional 5 or 10 percent discount for almost all flood insurance policy holders. I will provide further updates as this review process continues.   Council also approved a shared services agreement with the Ocean City Housing Authority, which operates under the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development. The agreement is a preliminary document that forms a partnership in expanding housing opportunities for low-income residents at existing complexes along Fourth Street and Sixth Street. The agreement also marks the continuation of our efforts to meet affordable housing obligations that were outlined in a settlement with the Fair Share Housing Center this summer. In the coming months and years, you will hear more as we work to make Ocean City affordable for all our year-round residents.I want to remind everybody that the Ocean City Fire Department’s Open House has been rescheduled for this evening from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the headquarters at 550 Asbury Avenue. The entire community is invited to this event, which coincides with national Fire Prevention Month and gives the community a chance to learn more about how our fire and police departments work and to enjoy demonstrations like a live burn and a helicopter landing.If you haven’t made it to the new Chili Chowder Fest in the past two years, you should check out the third annual event on Sunday at the Music Pier. Ocean City’s restaurants will be cooking their finest chilis and chowders from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Earlier on Sunday, thousands will participate in the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk on the boardwalk. See more information  on how to participate. On Saturday, we’ll welcome the Ocean City NJ Jeep Invasion with vehicles on display on the boardwalk between Fifth Street and 14th Street.I hope you all have a great weekend.Warm regards,Mayor Jay A. Gillian Mayor Jay Gillianlast_img read more

Farewell Budweiser Pyramid

first_imgLet’s do a quick poll. Raise your hand if you ever wanted to be like Dan O’Callahan. Anyone else? No? Okay, you may not know that Dan O’ was the hard drinking, freeskiing guru in Hot Dog…The Movie (circa 1983). He wore a blue jumpsuit and New York Mets hat, and he changed my life and the life of so many other young, impressionable skiers during that decade of decadence. If you’re not familiar with Hot Dog…The Movie, the tagline from the trailer pretty much sums it up: “By day, they’re the finest hot dogging, freestyle skiers in the world. By night, they really take chances.”Imagine 1.5 hours of gratuitous nudity, binge drinking, and state of the art (for the ‘80s) ski scenes. Oh, and ‘80s super-hottie Shannon Tweed was in it. You can see why I’d be so smitten.I don’t know what was more inspiring to me, the rad skiing or the hot tub scenes. Okay, that’s a lie, the hot tub scenes were what really got me motivated to be as much of a ski bum as I could possibly be while growing up in Georgia. Yes, the ballet ski scenes were enlightening, but I was more impressed with the skier lifestyle. Specifically, the notion of doing shots at a dive bar where the men wear fur coats and the women don’t wear much at all. First tracks and powder shots are great, but the off chance that you’ll meet Shannon Tweed in a hot tub is why you ski.My buddies and I watched Hot Dog during every ski trip, whether we were traveling to the Rockies or hitting North Carolina for a weekend. It was our inspiration, our self-help guide through the slopes and après ski shenanigans.Picture half a dozen dudes from Georgia tailgating at the base of Breckenridge, blaring David Allan Coe and piling Budweisers up in the snow at an alarming rate. I never skied without a flask of whiskey. One year, I even mixed martinis on the lift. With vermouth. And olives.We ate nothing but Apple Jacks and pizza, skied eight hours straight, then proceeded to trash the condo while blaring the entire Beastie Boys catalogue. We slept eight to a room, rarely showered (there was always a keg in the tub, anyway), and never napped. The final run of each day followed strict Chinese Downhill Rules (google it).Our latest ski trip was a bit different. First, the number of participants has slimmed quite a bit in recent years. For many of the original crew, four days of powder has been pushed down the priority list by mortgage payments and children’s classes.So, only a hardy few adhere to the ski trip ritual, which looks nothing like the original four days of powder and debauchery. Instead of finding the cheapest room for the latest trip, one of our wives wouldn’t rest until she found a condo with hardwood floors. So she could do yoga every morning. Yoga. I’d like to single her out as lame, but the fact is, I joined her for yoga routinely. It’s the only way I could get my hip moving properly.Back in the day, there was nothing quite like the potential of foreplay in the hot tub, but now I have to avoid that sort of concentrated heat altogether because it puts me right to sleep.Instead of a keg of Keystone Light, the fridge was stocked with craft beer and wine—most of which we left for the housekeeper when we checked out. After skiing all day, we managed two beers before falling asleep on the couchInstead of pizza, we hunted for sushi. Or Thai. Or something with a farm-to-fork philosophy behind it. Something I never said to a waiter during a ski trip when I was younger: “Is that chicken locally raised?”It was a rare night that any of us made it past 10pm.I’m not exactly sure when the ski trip shifted from winter frat party to relaxing yoga retreat. I guess it just evolved slowly, like some ancient slug-beast making its way out of the primordial ooze. But here’s the most shocking aspect of this evolution: I like our ski trips so much more now. Yes, I miss tailgating and every once in a while when I’m on the lift, I crave a martini, but it turns out, I’m a much better skier when I’m sober. Skiing trees when your blood alcohol level is .08 percent is basically Russian roulette with a $75 lift ticket. I’m amazed I survived through so many years of stupidity. Chalk it up to pure luck. Now I ski trees and steeps with clarity. I’m well nourished, well-rested, and thinking relatively swiftly. So while most athletes see their skill level wane as they get older, I’m hitting my prime, mostly because my reaction time and sense of balance aren’t hindered by morning beer bong hits.Getting older never felt so good. •Chinese Downhilllast_img read more

Are you playing offense or defense?

first_img 38SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Anthony Demangone Anthony Demangone is executive vice president and chief operating officer at the National Association of Federal Credit Unions (NAFCU). Demangone oversees day-to-day operations and manages the association’s education, membership, … Web: https://www.cuinsight.com/partner/nafcu Details It is a simple question about your organization’s collective mindset.Are you focused on protecting what you have, or on trying to seize new opportunities?The changes going on in our marketplace are part of a long continuous process. Each chapter in the saga produces its own set of challenges. I contend that each challenge is either a problem or an opportunity. Which it is depends on how you approach the challenge.“How will this change hurt us?”That is a valid question. You need defenders on your team.But how often do we ask this, instead?“How can we take advantage of this change? How can it help us?”You need to play offense as well. On your team, who is playing offense? Who is looking to take advantage of change?last_img read more

Optimizing the member journey with episodic management

first_imgCustomer care seems to be on the forefront of everyone’s mind as more organizations shift their focus to elevate the experiences their customers have with their brands. A survey released by Gartner states that 89% of companies expect to compete mostly on the basis of customer experience, compared with 36% four years prior. Whether you realize it or not, your members are forming opinions about your credit union as they utilize your products and services. And these interactions with your brand, whether positive or negative, are shaping their member journey. Unfortunately for many credit unions, there are discrepancies between what the members are saying about their experiences versus what their metrics may report, making it challenging for institutions to optimize their members’ journeys. According to a report from Lee Resources, 80% of the companies say they deliver “superior” customer service while only 8% of the people think these same companies deliver “superior” customer service. To truly understand the member journey, institutions need to view the member experience from an individual’s perspective. One way to achieve this is to implement a new management process called the episode which can incorporate a variety of shopping, usage or service activities. When carried out properly, this new management process will help you to better understand the member’s perspective, and successfully optimize the member journey – improving your market competitiveness. What’s an Episode?When a member interacts with your institution, that’s an episode. An episode has a clear start and end, and it can range from a single interaction to a series of interactions over time. The culmination of all the episodes results in the member experience with your brand so your institution needs to make sure each episode results in a delightful encounter. For most organizations, episodes can be categories into three groups:  By effectively implementing episodes, organizations are able to gain a holistic view of the member experience, and as a result, address the member experience when necessary.How to Manage EpisodesEffective episode management succeeds on a self-directing and self-correcting workforce and trusted partners. Instead of developing lots of company policies, management should devote time to empower your employees to constantly make course corrections on their own by providing timely feedback. This allows employees and external partners the freedom to make decisions and take necessary actions. To avoid duplicating work and to successfully manage episodes, consider the following: When member experience weighs just as heavily as your core products, you should only partner with organizations that offer the highest member experience that aligns with your values. It’s crucial for your partners to treat your members in manners that reflect your own institution’s standards. Generali Global Assistance, an organization with decades of experience in protecting millions of identities and trusted by leading Fortune 500 companies, is committed to offering the highest customer service, and our award-winning resolution team goes above and beyond to empathize, assist, and take immediate action on your behalf. If you’re ready to partner with an organization which encompasses similar values to your own institution’s, request a demo of our people-first identity and data protection product and services. 36SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Paige L. Schaffer Paige L. Schaffer is President & COO of the Identity and Digital Protection Services Global Unit for Generali Global Assistance. Ms. Schaffer leads sales & marketing strategy and revenue growth … Web: us.generaliglobalassistance.com Detailslast_img read more

Why your internal brand keeps getting bounced

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr “How to score a winning organization.” “The playbook for business success.” There’s a lot of sports clichés within the corporate world.Why?Quite simply, we’re fans. We understand that whether it be on the football field, the soccer pitch or the baseball diamond, there’s intense competition and strategy that will lead to a winner and a loser. In the “big leagues” of banking, we know who the top challengers are, and we want to score more runs than them (see what I just did there?).While I’m a champion for community financial institutions across the country, I’m also the athletic director at my church. I’ve coached basketball for 6th, 7th and 8th-grade boys and girls for more than 15 years. My squads include kids who were cut by school basketball teams to those who picked up a basketball for the very first time.It truly is a hodgepodge of talent. Perhaps not so different from your credit union or community bank. And while you may be expecting a tale of hard work and perseverance, I bet you can learn a lot about your internal brand culture from a youth basketball program down in Simpsonville, S.C. continue reading »last_img read more

Long Island Municipalities That Get It Right: What Do They Know That Others Don’t?

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York [dropcap]A[/dropcap]cross the Island some municipalities are clearly ahead of the pack. These communities possess the good fortune to have visionary leaders, courageous council members and the right combination of assets, infrastructure and drive to make a difference in people’s lives. When you look for local role models, a few stellar examples quickly come to mind: Jack Schnirman, Long Beach city manager; Paul Pontieri, mayor of Patchogue; Francis X. Murray, mayor of Rockville Centre; and state Sen. Jack Martins, the former mayor of Mineola. They didn’t all face the same problems, but these guys knew how to get it right. For Long Beach, Jack Schnirman faced a daunting challenge. As city manager, he wasn’t an elected leader but he was responsible for getting all the parties on board so he could right the city’s precarious finances. He inherited a $14.7 million deficit and he turned it around so now the city has a $7 million fund balance. Long Beach just got its eighth consecutive positive credit action from Moody’s. Not only did they upgrade the city’s bond rating, they gave the city a positive outlook going forward.By comparison, Nassau County is under the control of the Nassau Interim Finance Authority (NIFA) because of its chronic failure to balance the books. The Town of Hempstead’s credit rating has been downgraded many times, and Moody’s just withdrew its rating for the Town of Oyster Bay due to irregular filings—town officials say a computer broke down—and Standard & Poor’s is contemplating doing the same. In the town’s defense, a withdrawal is not the same as a downgrade, but it’s not an encouraging sign. Both ratings agencies have given the Town of Oyster Bay until the end of March to get its financial filings in order before they issue their ratings.“We are proud to be one of the municipalities moving in the right direction,” said Schnirman.On his watch, Long Beach declared a fiscal crisis, working with the city’s employees to achieve some contract concessions and downsize the workforce. Then came Superstorm Sandy. Still, by all accounts, Long Beach has managed to rebound—and been rewarded by consecutive good bond ratings. Schnirman praises the city council for “fiercely advocating for the resources to rebuild our city the right way with stronger infrastructure to protect ourselves from future storms.”To Schnirman’s credit, he navigated the city through the aftermath while staying within Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s tax cap of either a 2-percent limit or the rate of inflation, whichever is lower. In Long Beach, the allowable tax increase is .47 percent because inflation is so low.“The challenge is that it caps revenue but it doesn’t cap expenses,” he explained. “Many of the fixed costs go up every year far greater than the size of the cap, so it necessitates constantly making cuts and difficult choices and being creative in order to live within it.”But Schnirman has been able to make it work.Handout: Long Beach City Manager Jack Schnirman“Jack has brought exceptional professionalism to the management of the city’s finances, and the repair and development of its infrastructure,” said Lawrence C. Levy, executive dean at Hofstra University’s National Center for Suburban Studies. “He was one of the heroes of Sandy.”Looking around the Island, Levy singles out Rockville Centre Mayor Francis X. Murray for what he’s done for his community. “Fran Murray is one of those mayors who has come to realize that the future of the village lies in making even better use of a strong downtown,” explained Levy. “He has understood that a lot of people want to move to Rockville Centre, but not everybody wants to live in a traditional, single-family house. They want rental apartments. They want to be able to walk to restaurants, to the movie theater.”Murray’s solution was to go vertical to solve the parking problem as well as add more apartments. Critics said Murray’s plan calling for more density was untenable, making the dire prediction that “Queensification” was about to transform their village, but it did not come to pass, as Levy observed.“Rockville Centre could be a model for downtown development rocketing a whole village!” said Levy. And he should know, because he now calls the village home. State Sen. Jack Martins (R-Mineola) first made waves in municipal circles when he helped transform Mineola as mayor by focusing on its downtown.“He used to have political leaders and other supporters whispering in his ear that if he goes ahead with his proposed high rises [downtown], his promising career would come to an end,” Levy said. “He just didn’t listen. He decided this was best for the village. People would see it and the payoff would be huge.” They did and it was. Martins won his mayoral re-election by “an enormous margin,” Levy observed, then he won his state Senate race by defeating an incumbent Democrat and now he’s running for Congress to fill the empty seat vacated by Rep. Steve Israel (D-Dix Hills). In some sense, things started looking up for Martins when he embraced high rises.Patchogue Mayor Paul Pontieri faced a different problem.“I think Paul Pontieri had the hardest row to hoe,” said Levy. “He started with a village that was deeply down on its heels and almost hopeless.” Among his initiatives in Patchogue, Pontieri brought in a cultural arts center, encouraged developers to offer relatively affordable residential options, and created a vibrant, younger feel to the downtown. Handout: Patchogue Village Mayor Paul Pontieri“But he had to go to war with the political and business and civic establishment,” Levy said. “He was willing to put his career and his mayoralty on the line, and he has been validated and vindicated over and over again. People often refer to him as the poster child for the new suburbia of Long Island.”Pontieri himself puts it more humbly.“I lived in Patchogue my whole life so I knew we had the bones and the strength to get something done,” he said. “What I saw were blighted properties that could be turned into opportunities.”He got upgrades for the village’s sewage treatment plant to accommodate higher density. Or, as Levy put it, “He not only saw above ground—he saw below ground!”Pontieri knew he had to revitalize the village’s downtown. “Nothing comes into a town that is empty. You need to put feet on the street,” he said. And there was another stark reality, which may sound ironic today. “We had a parking problem—there were empty spaces.” In fact, about 2,000 of them, he said.But a decade ago in came Copper Beech Village, developed by Pulti Homes of New York, on a 5-acre site with 80 units of affordable housing—16 per acre. Suffolk County chipped in $3.3 million to help Patchogue acquire the land from the previous homeowners. Then other high-density developments started sprouting up. “Once Pulti invested the first $5 million, it said that we’re worth investing in,” said Pontieri. “We cleaned up five acres of blighted property and put in 80 families with an average age of 38 years old.” Young families are vital to the future, Pontieri says. “The communities that fight this, they’re going to be the ones without the Little Leagues, because young families won’t have a place to start or invest in,” the mayor said, pointing out that his vision comes with some self-interest as well. “Someday I’m going to want to sell my house, and I’m hoping that one of these kids who’s invested in this village will look at my home and want to buy it!”Villagers started to get with the program he laid out once they could see the caliber of the development, the attention to design and details. “Let the developers make the money they need to make and they’ll stay with the project and give you quality,” Pontieri said. “Squeeze them too much and you end up with what you deserve.”Can other villages do what Pontieri did with Patchogue? “They can duplicate it,” the mayor insisted. “Don’t just listen to the gray-haired guys in the audience saying, ‘No!’ Understand that there’s a majority of the population out there that’s looking for change.”What these leaders have in common, Levy said, is “They’ve dared to be different.”last_img read more

A NEW ERA: Syracuse holds off Kansas State to win first bowl game since 2001

first_img Published on December 29, 2010 at 12:00 pm Comments NEW YORK — Nathaniel Hackett saw something click in Marcus Sales four weeks ago in practice. Something changed, in his work ethic and preparation.And when he saw Sales standing in the end zone for the third time on the day, with 7:53 remaining, it was clear something did click. After a season in which the junior wide receiver scored just one touchdown, Sales tripled his scoring output in one game.‘It feels real good,’ Sales said. ‘Finally, I got a chance and I just made the plays when they counted.’Behind a strong rushing attack led by Delone Carter and a big-play passing attack led by Sales, the offensive play-caller Hackett and head coach Doug Marrone’s offense opened up Thursday. In a wild inaugural New Era Pinstripe Bowl in Yankee Stadium in front of 38,274, Syracuse (8-5, 4-3 Big East) was able to keep up and win a 36-34 shootout over Kansas State (7-6, 3-5 Big 12).The win gave SU its first bowl victory since the 2001 Insight.com Bowl — also against Kansas State.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text‘They made a young kid from the Bronx’s dream come true,’ Marrone said of his players while accepting the Pinstripe Bowl trophy. ‘And win this trophy at Yankee Stadium!’The Orange defense bent but did not break late in the fourth quarter, which sealed the victory. With 1:13 remaining, KSU quarterback Carson Coffman tossed a 30-yard touchdown strike to Adrian Hilburn, who flashed a celebratory salute after scoring. The officials issued a personal foul for excessive celebration. Down by two, the Wildcats couldn’t convert the two-point conversion from 18 yards out.When asked about the penalty after the game, Kansas State head coach Bill Snyder paused four seconds before saying, ‘I can’t comment on that.’Though the Syracuse defense ultimately preserved the win, it was the SU’s offense that uncharacteristically brought the team to that point.Carter and the combination of quarterback Ryan Nassib and Sales carried Syracuse throughout the game. Twenty-seven carries, a career-high 198 yards and two touchdowns for the senior running back Carter in his swan song for the Orange.Five catches, 172 yards and three touchdowns all added up to a career game for the once-forgotten Sales. Nassib was happy to feed him the ball, as 172 of Nassib’s 239 passing yards and all three of his touchdowns went to Sales.Marrone singled Sales out in Wednesday’s pre-Pinstripe Bowl meeting with his team, reflecting upon the progress he saw in Sales.‘I pointed out Marcus Sales and how well he’s worked and the practices he’s had,’ Marrone said of that meeting. ‘And he came out and had a big game.’An SU offense that had only one play go more than 50 yards all year long would double that total Thursday.The first of those plays that came late in the first quarter. The Orange marched close to the 50-yard line, Hackett’s target point to open up the offense. And as Hackett looked at the KSU coverage, he knew the safety would bite.So as Antwon Bailey ran up the middle for what looked like a simple, straight-ahead running play, Hackett broke out the trickery. Bailey flung the ball back to Nassib on a flea flicker, and Nassib hung a perfect spiraling throw 52 yards to Sales to tie the game at 7-7.‘We practiced it all week,’ Sales said. ‘I knew it had a chance to come to me when the safety came down. So I just put my head down and ran, and looked for the ball when it came. And I caught it.’Behind another long Sales touchdown catch — this time from 36 yards out — SU went into the half tied at 14-14. The second half quickly turned into a shootout, with Syracuse and Kansas State trading offensive blows. Carter barreled in for two touchdowns, but the Wildcats answered with two touchdown scores of their own.The Orange found itself trailing by a point with 11 minutes left when Sales’ number was called again on the game-changing drive. First, he caught a crucial 18-yard pass to extend Syracuse’s drive on third down.And his second act came with the Orange on the KSU 44-yard line. Sales’ defender slipped, setting him wide open down the field, and Nassib found him again for the long touchdown score that gave SU the lead for good.The receiver who wasn’t on the depth chart at the beginning of SU’s season carried the team and program to its biggest victory in a decade.Flashing an uncharacteristic grin that was reminiscent of the boy from the Bronx, Marrone thought it was a fitting resemblance for where his program has come in just two short years.‘It’s about creating challenges and goals for your players,’ Marrone said. ‘And they responded.’[email protected]center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Why Older People Are Most At Risk From COVID-19

first_imgThe innate immune response is tuned to pounce on types of molecules that are commonly found on bacteria and viruses but not in human cells. When a cell detects these invader molecules, it triggers production of an antiviral interferon protein. Interferon triggers the infected cell to die, limiting infection. Older Immune Systems Are Weaker Maybe your physician has checked your white blood cell levels. That’s a measurement of whether you have more B-cells and T-cells in your blood than usual, presumably because they’re fighting infection. However, the statistics get grimmer as the patients get older. Whereas people in their 60s have a 0.4 percent chance of dying, people in their 70s have a 1.3 percent chance of dying, and people over 80 have a 3.6 percent chance of dying. While this may not sound like a high chance of death, during the outbreak in Italy, 83 percent of those who succumbed to COVID-19 infection were over age 60. When a pathogen invades, the difference between illness and health is a race between how fast the pathogen can spread within you and how fast your immune response can react without causing too much collateral damage. The mist ejected by a sneeze can launch viruses airborne, so other people can inhale them. That’s where your immune system comes in. It’s your body’s defense system against these kinds of invaders. Before you’re even born, your body starts producing specialized B-cells and T-cells – types of white blood cells that can recognize pathogens and help block their growth. Another type of innate immune cell, called a monocyte, acts as a sort of cellular bouncer, getting rid of any infected cells it finds and signaling the adaptive immune response to shift into gear. Keeping at least 6 feet away from other people helps significantly reduce your chance of being infected by these aerosol droplets. But there’s still the possibility for virus to contaminate surfaces that infected people have touched or coughed on. Therefore, the best way to protect vulnerable older and immunocompromised people is to stay away from them until there is no longer a risk. When you’re very young, you don’t have a lot of these B- or T-cells. It can be a challenge for your body to control infection because it’s simply not used to the job. As you mature, your adaptive immune system learns to recognize pathogens and handle these constant invasions, allowing you to fight off infection quickly and effectively. The coronavirus pandemic is taking a particularly harsh toll on older people. As you age, the reduced “attention span” of your innate and adaptive immune responses make it harder for the body to respond to viral infection, giving the virus the upper hand. Viruses can take advantage of your immune system’s slow start and quickly overwhelm you, resulting in serious disease and death. COVID-19 is caused by a respiratory virus, which can spread via tiny virus-containing droplets. Larger droplets fall to the ground quickly; very small droplets dry up. Mid-range droplets are of most concern because they can float in the air for a few feet before drying. These droplets can be inhaled into the lungs. Data from the initial outbreak in China and then Italy show that infected people under the age of 60 are at low—but not no—risk of dying from COVID-19. More recent data from the U.S. suggest that a higher rate of people in their 30s and 40s have experienced severe illness and even death than previously thought. Curiously, young children do not appear to be at increased risk of serious COVID-19 complications, in contrast to what happens with other viruses, like the seasonal flu. Low-grade chronic inflammation in individuals that commonly occurs during aging can also dull the ability of the innate and adaptive immune responses to react to pathogens. It’s similar to becoming used to an annoying sound over time.center_img The innate and adaptive immune systems can act together as a fine-tuned machine to detect and clear out pathogens. Everyone, no matter their age, needs to protect themselves from infection, not just to keep themselves healthy but also to help protect the most vulnerable. Given the difficulty older individuals have in controlling viral infection, the best option is for these individuals to avoid becoming infected by viruses in the first place. During an infection, your B-cells can proliferate and produce antibodies that grab onto pathogens and block their ability to spread within your body. T-cells work by recognizing infected cells and killing them. Together they make up what scientists call your “adaptive” immune system. The Covid-19, health, safety and pandemic concept – senior old lonely woman wearing protective medical mask sitting near the window in his house for protection from virus Social Distancing Is Vital While white blood cells are powerful people protectors, they’re not enough on their own. Luckily, your immune system has another layer, what’s called your “innate” immune response. Every cell has its own little immune system that allows it to directly respond to pathogens quicker than it takes to mobilize the adaptive response. What is it that puts older people at increased risk from viruses like this? It’s primarily thought to be due to changes in the human immune system as they age. Your Body’s Tools to Fight Off Virus Infections Brian Geiss is an Associate Professor of Microbiology, Immunology & Pathology at Colorado State University As people age, their innate and adaptive immune responses change, shifting this balance. This is where washing hands, avoiding touching your face, self-isolation and social distancing all become important, especially for COVID-19. As you go about your life, your body is constantly bombarded by pathogens – bacteria, fungi and viruses that can make you sick. A human body is a great place for these organisms to grow and thrive, providing a nice warm environment with plenty of nutrients. As COV1D-19 continues to spread, this older age group will continue to be at risk for serious disease and death.last_img read more

Adin Vrabac to enter the NBA Draft in June?

first_imgAdin Vrabac, the representative of Bosnia and Herzegovina national basketball team after the end of the season, in which he performs for the German Trier, will enter the NBA draft.Together with former co-player from Spars, Nedim Buza, will be representative of our national team in America, as confirmed from the Basketball Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina.Draft will be held on 25th of June in New York, in the hall of Brooklyn Nets, Barclays Center. Last year, the two of them reported for the NBA draft, but subsequently withdrew their applications as they can do this year as well.Vrabac performed last night for Trier in the victory of his team against Phoenix Hagen with score of 77:70, and scored seven points and three rebounds. (Source: Faktor.ba)last_img read more

Doing a job well

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe top 10 theme park moments of 2019 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Re “Topanga Fire: What went right” (Oct. 1): It is simply amazing how well the “mutual aid” program for California’s firefighters is working out. They come from everywhere, quietly do their job and then return to their own communities without a word. We do not miss the political actions of the politicians making speeches and looking for photo ops. My hat is off to the fire personnel and the other emergency personnel doing a job well. Are these the people that our governor calls “special interest?” Their special interest is working for the interests of the people who need them. Ira Kaplan Woodland Hills This is L.A. Re “Topanga Fire: What went right” (Oct. 1): Toto, I don’t think we’re in New Orleans anymore. This is L.A. and the LAFD. Thousands of acres, hours and hours of fighting the blaze and three homes and one injury. C’mon. Give it up for the Los Angeles Fire Department and all the other departments who assisted! They are America’s finest. Tim Culhane Woodland Hills Inter-agency system Did you ever wonder how it is possible to bring together within a few hours 3,000 personnel from many different agencies working together effectively on a 20,000-acre incident? That system is called the Incident Command System that was developed by an inter-agency program in Southern California. Originally designed for use in wildfires, ICS has now become the standard for all jurisdictions and emergency-response disciplines in the country for any type of incident. A component of that system is unified command, which ensures that each agency with incident jurisdiction has a say in developing objectives and a single overall incident action plan. Terence Haney West Hills Agriculture program Re “Grant High cutting agriculture program” (Sept. 29): I was plant manager at Grant High School from 1982 to 1989. In those years, just about every principal threatened to close the program. Doc Wainwright always had a fight on his hands. The sad thing is that the program was one of the most successful programs I ever saw in the 25 years I spent with the LAUSD. Wainwright has a magical ability to get along with the kids and can get through to them. Even the most hard-core types. I’ve seen kids do a 180-degree turnaround under Doc. This is one of the reasons that the LAUSD is such a dismal failure. They abandon successful programs in favor of those that have political clout. The kids just don’t seem to matter anymore. I feel sorry for the kids. James P. Biddle Quartz Hill Building for fire Re “At ‘war’ with fire” (Sept. 30): Just as with New Orleans, a city built eight feet below sea level with inadequate levees and sea walls, we here in Southern California build homes surrounded by more than adequate fuel for wind-driven annual fires. These fires are not surprising anyone. These are annual conditions. So the question lies wherein: Why do our “city planners and leaders” continue to allow housing construction in these areas, but don’t enforce large firebreak areas to be built by the developers? This should be standard procedure. These breaks must be monitored just as graffiti is. Wake up, Los Angeles! It’s quite obvious. Richard Detanna Granada Hills Sense of modesty Re “Pinups lift G.I.’s spirits” (Sept. 27): We Americans are so ignorant sometimes. Hmmmmmmm let me see … My husband (or boyfriend) is away in Iraq with the National Guard, how can I comfort him? I know, I’ll lose all self-respect and sense of modesty, take a risque picture of myself and send it overseas to him and his buddies to salivate over. Our soldiers do not need any more help to be unfaithful to their spouses or loved ones, especially when so far away from home when temptations are strongest. (Nor should they have to worry about their spouse at home allowing someone to take intimate shots of them for the front page of a local newspaper.) How about a fabulous “I love and miss you” care package? Joann Saraceno Glendale Stealth religion Re “‘Intelligent design’ not taught” (Sept. 29): Bravo for State Superintendent of Public Instruction Jack O’Connell. So-called “intelligent design” is merely a stealth name for creationism, which the U.S. Supreme Court has already banned from public schools on grounds that it is religion, not science. ID proponents are fundamentalist Christians who desperately oppose evolution because it lays the lie to their mythological beliefs. Michael D. Harris Reseda Maybe a trade-off Re “‘Intelligent design’ not taught” (Sept. 29): If push comes to shove, “intelligent design” should be taught in our school classrooms. A fair trade-off would be to have every church pay a scientist to come to their place of worship and teach their flock that God is nothing but a man-made theory. The scientist could then point out that humans “doing something” instead of praying for it is more productive. And if we fairly taxed all religions, we could fulfill Christ’s orders to feed the hungry, heal the sick and take care of the poor. Wait a minute. That would make Christ out to be a commie. Never mind. Dick Denne Toluca Lake Best for elephants Re “L.A. Zoo needs to give its elephants a break” (Their Opinions, Sept. 28): It is absurd that the city of Los Angeles is planning to spend $16 million to expand the elephant enclosure to two acres _ this is nowhere near enough space for these very large animals to reside. It is well known that elephants can roam up to 25 miles or more in a single day. What good is two acres? This city is being selfish when it comes to the well-being of these animals. What is best for these animals is to send them to a sanctuary, which is what some zoos are now doing. At a sanctuary they have hundreds of acres in which to roam, not two. Hopefully the mayor will do what is best for them and not do what is best for the city. Tia Triplett Los Angeles Wal-Mart works Re “Wal-Mart prepared” (Your Opinions, Sept. 28): Go Wal-Mart. Where do we sign up to support Wal-Mart _ other than traveling miles to shop at their store because the unions won’t let them come to our neighborhoods? I’m for WEMA (Wal-Mart Emergency Management Agency). Ruth Fairrington Los Angeles Heinous criminal Re “She’s a scapegoat” (Your Opinions, Sept. 29): Art Haendiges is completely mistaken. Lynndie England is not a scapegoat. Lynndie England is a heinous criminal, a torturer, who should have been sentenced to death. Therefore, in order for our military to regain a semblance of honor she should be executed in military fashion, which I understand is by firing squad. Note I said semblance of honor, and not the real thing. Our military and country lost all honor, irretrievably, with Mei Lai long ago. Kathryn Durfee Agoura Deadlier disaster As America is transfixed by Katrina’s and Rita’s horrible devastation, avian influenza is growing into a global epidemic deadlier than the 1918 Spanish flu, which killed 50 million people. The deadly virus originated in Asia’s poultry farms and has already spread to Russia and Europe. Millions of Americans will succumb, once the virus mutates to allow transmission among humans. Raising animals for food also increases the risk of many chronic diseases that kill 1.3 million Americans annually. It funds pollution of waterways by animal waste, destruction of wildlife habitats, and abuse of animals in factory farms and slaughterhouses. William Davidson Woodland Hillslast_img read more