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Local Scientist Helps Chart the Rise and Fall of Galaxies Across 90 Percent of Cosmic History

first_imgA Pasadena-based scientist along with an international team of astronomers has charted the rise and fall of galaxies in over 90 percent of the universe’s cosmic history, an accomplishment published recently by The Astrophysics Journal.Eric Persson, of the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena, built the instruments used in the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE) which created multicolored photos of galaxies as they swelled from their humble beginnings as dust clouds into the grandiose giants they are now, according to a statement released by Carnegie Science to the media.Astronomers at the Carnegie Observatories, situated on quiet Santa Barbara Street off North Lake Avenue, have played a pivotal role ion the past century of astronomy. Carnegie astronomers continue to play a pivotal role in studying and understanding the early universe.To create the photos, Persson and the team of scientists had to measure distance and brightness of over 700,000 galaxies spanning 12 billion years of cosmic time, according to the release.The team then used infrared detecting filters and took images with them using the Baade Telescope in Las Campanas, Chile, creating a 3D map which revealed that galaxies have existed as early as 12.5 years ago, less than 10 percent of universe’s current age.“Perhaps the most surprising result is that galaxies in the young universe appear as diverse as they are today, when the universe is older and much more evolved, “ said lead author Caroline Straatman in the press release, a recent graduate of Leiden University. “The fact that we see young galaxies in the distant universe that have already shut down star formation is remarkable.”According to the press release, the ZFOURGE has given scientists the best view of our universe’s youth yet. In the study’s earliest stages, the team found a cluster of galaxies formed 11 billion years ago, which they dubbed “galaxy city.”“The combination of FourStar, the special filters, Magellan and the conditions at Las Campanas led to the detection of the cluster,” said Persson in the media statement. “It was in a very well-studied region of the sky — hiding in plain sight.”The Carnegie Observatory first opened in Pasadena in 1904 as the Mount Wilson observatory, where Edwin Hubble transformed our notions of space with his famed telescope.For more, see http://obs.carnegiescience.edu/ 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Science and Technology Local Scientist Helps Chart the Rise and Fall of Galaxies Across 90 Percent of Cosmic History By RON ROKHY Published on Tuesday, August 30, 2016 | 5:26 pm Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Community News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday First Heatwave Expected Next Week Business News Community Newscenter_img Subscribe Make a comment Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Herbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Tips To Rejuvenate Winter Dry, Chapped LipsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNerdy Movie Kids Who Look Unrecognizable TodayHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeauty faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes More Cool Stuff Top of the News last_img read more

Met Éireann issues Status Orange weather warning for Limerick

first_imgLimerickNewsMet Éireann issues Status Orange weather warning for LimerickBy Meghann Scully – January 12, 2020 1106 Email Advertisement Facebook Linkedin Previous articleRacing 92 prove too much for Munster in ParisNext articleCalls for a ‘Tall Buildings Strategy’ for Limerick City Meghann Scully RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Storm Eleanor is about to make landfall in West MunsterMet Éireann has issued a Status Orange wind warning for the entire country.Storm Brendan will cause high winds during the night that will bring rain during the day.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up A statement on Twitter read “#StormBrendan Status Orange warnings are in force for all counties & Status Red in marine areas. Status Orange conditions may pose a threat to life & property. Dangerous driving conditions, risk of falling trees. Avoid coastal areas if possible,”. Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash center_img Twitter Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live WhatsApp Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Print TAGSKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick PostStorm Brendanweather last_img read more

Ringo Starr Announces 2019 World Tour With His All Starr Band

first_imgToday, Ringo Starr has announced a 2019 world tour in celebration of the 30th anniversary of his All Starr Band. The announcement comes as Starr and his current All Starr Band lineup wrap up their ongoing 2018 tour this month.After beginning with a date at Harrah’s Southern California Resort and Casino on March 21st, Ringo and company will head to Japan for a stretch of 9 performances across the country throughout the month of April. The tour will continue in August, when Starr and the All Starr Band head back to North America, for a show in Ontario, Canada (8/1) followed by two-night runs in Chicago, IL (8/3, 8/4) and Nashville, TN (8/7, 8/8). Finally, the tour will wrap with a concert at The Greek Theater in Los Angeles, CA on September 1st.The 2019 iteration of the former The Beatles drummer’s All Starr Band will feature vocalist/guitarist Colin Hay (Men at Work), guitarist Steve Lukather (Toto), vocalist/keyboardist Gregg Rolie (Santana, Journey), saxophonist Warren Ham (Toto, Bloodrock), drummer Gregg Bissonette (Toto, Santana), and Hamish Stuart (Average White Band). Stuart is the only member of the new lineup that was not a part of the band’s 2018 U.S. tour this year, though he previously toured with the All Starr Band in 2006 and 2008. He replaces bassist/vocalist Graham Gouldman (10cc), who was the newest addition to the band this past tour.See below for a full list of upcoming dates.Ringo Starr And His All Starr Band Tour DatesMarch 21st – Funner, CA @ Harrah’s Resort Southern CaliforniaMarch 27th – Fukuoka, Japan @ Sun Palace HallMar 29th – Hiroshima, Japan @ UenogakuenApril 1st – Miyagi Sendai Japan @ Tokyo Electron HallApril 2nd – Koriyama, Japan @ Shimin CenterApril 3rd – Tokyo, Japan @ Hitomi Kinen KodoApril 5th – Tokyo, Japan @ Dome City HallApril 9th – Nagoya, Japan @ Zepp,April 10th – Osaka, Japan @ Archaic Hall,Apr 11th – Osaka, Japan @ Orix TheatreAugust 1st – Windsor, Ontario @ Caesar’s in WindsorAugust 3rd – Chicago, IL @ RaviniaAugust 4th – Chicago, IL @ RaviniaAugust 7th – Nashville, TN @ The RymanAugust 8th – Nashville, TN @ The RymanSeptember 1st – Los Angeles, CA @ The Greek TheaterView All Tour Dates[H/T Rolling Stone]last_img read more

Raiders Split Games With Bengals

first_imgSouth Ripley at Greendale Middle School Boys Basketball.Monday  (12-14)7th Grade-South Ripley 50 Greendale 32.The Raiders jumped out to an early lead over the host Tigers and never looked back in route to a 50-32 victory. Lane Sparks led the visitors with 18 points and Bryce Franklin added 13 in a great all around game. Also scoring was Brady Linkel with 10, Cody Samples 5, Dillon Binion 2 and Jacob Jines 2.The 7th graders improve to 12-1 on the year.8th Grade-Greendale 57 South Ripley 35.The visiting Raiders surrendered a season high 57 points to a very good Tiger team in a 57-35 loss. Dakota Day scored 13 points while Kaleb Rinear chipped in 7 points and 7 rebounds. Eric Vickers 6 points, Aaron Greiwe 5, Jon Adkins 1, and Conner McCarty 1 to round out the scoring.The 8th graders fall to 9-4 on the season.Both teams will be in action on Thursday at home against St. Louis of Batesville, 6:00 tip-off.Courtesy of Raiders Coach Jeff Greiwe.last_img read more

Must Read: NY Times Columnist Bari Weiss’ Resignation Letter

first_imgBari WeissDear A.G.,It is with sadness that I write to tell you that I am resigning from The New York Times. I joined the paper with gratitude and optimism three years ago. I was hired with the goal of bringing in voices that would not otherwise appear in your pages: first-time writers, centrists, conservatives and others who would not naturally think of The Times as their home. The reason for this effort was clear: The paper’s failure to anticipate the outcome of the 2016 election meant that it didn’t have a firm grasp of the country it covers. Dean Baquet and others have admitted as much on various occasions. The priority in Opinion was to help redress that critical shortcoming.I was honored to be part of that effort, led by James Bennet. I am proud of my work as a writer and as an editor. Among those I helped bring to our pages: the Venezuelan dissident Wuilly Arteaga; the Iranian chess champion Dorsa Derakhshani; and the Hong Kong Christian democrat Derek Lam. Also: Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Masih Alinejad, Zaina Arafat, Elna Baker, Rachael Denhollander, Matti Friedman, Nick Gillespie, Heather Heying, Randall Kennedy, Julius Krein, Monica Lewinsky, Glenn Loury, Jesse Singal, Ali Soufan, Chloe Valdary, Thomas Chatterton Williams, Wesley Yang, and many others.But the lessons that ought to have followed the election—lessons about the importance of understanding other Americans, the necessity of resisting tribalism, and the centrality of the free exchange of ideas to a democratic society—have not been learned. Instead, a new consensus has emerged in the press, but perhaps especially at this paper: that truth isn’t a process of collective discovery, but an orthodoxy already known to an enlightened few whose job is to inform everyone else.Twitter is not on the masthead of The New York Times. But Twitter has become its ultimate editor. As the ethics and mores of that platform have become those of the paper, the paper itself has increasingly become a kind of performance space. Stories are chosen and told in a way to satisfy the narrowest of audiences, rather than to allow a curious public to read about the world and then draw their own conclusions. I was always taught that journalists were charged with writing the first rough draft of history. Now, history itself is one more ephemeral thing molded to fit the needs of a predetermined narrative.My own forays into Wrongthink have made me the subject of constant bullying by colleagues who disagree with my views. They have called me a Nazi and a racist; I have learned to brush off comments about how I’m “writing about the Jews again.” Several colleagues perceived to be friendly with me were badgered by coworkers. My work and my character are openly demeaned on company-wide Slack channels where masthead editors regularly weigh in. There, some coworkers insist I need to be rooted out if this company is to be a truly “inclusive” one, while others post ax emojis next to my name. Still other New York Times employees publicly smear me as a liar and a bigot on Twitter with no fear that harassing me will be met with appropriate action. They never are.There are terms for all of this: unlawful discrimination, hostile work environment, and constructive discharge. I’m no legal expert. But I know that this is wrong. I do not understand how you have allowed this kind of behavior to go on inside your company in full view of the paper’s entire staff and the public. And I certainly can’t square how you and other Times leaders have stood by while simultaneously praising me in private for my courage. Showing up for work as a centrist at an American newspaper should not require bravery.Part of me wishes I could say that my experience was unique. But the truth is that intellectual curiosity—let alone risk-taking—is now a liability at The Times. Why edit something challenging to our readers, or write something bold only to go through the numbing process of making it ideologically kosher, when we can assure ourselves of job security (and clicks) by publishing our 4000th op-ed arguing that Donald Trump is a unique danger to the country and the world? And so self-censorship has become the norm.What rules that remain at The Times are applied with extreme selectivity. If a person’s ideology is in keeping with the new orthodoxy, they and their work remain unscrutinized. Everyone else lives in fear of the digital thunderdome. Online venom is excused so long as it is directed at the proper targets. Op-eds that would have easily been published just two years ago would now get an editor or a writer in serious trouble, if not fired. If a piece is perceived as likely to inspire backlash internally or on social media, the editor or writer avoids pitching it. If she feels strongly enough to suggest it, she is quickly steered to safer ground. And if, every now and then, she succeeds in getting a piece published that does not explicitly promote progressive causes, it happens only after every line is carefully massaged, negotiated and caveated.It took the paper two days and two jobs to say that the Tom Cotton op-ed “fell short of our standards.” We attached an editor’s note on a travel story about Jaffa shortly after it was published because it “failed to touch on important aspects of Jaffa’s makeup and its history.” But there is still none appended to Cheryl Strayed’s fawning interview with the writer Alice Walker, a proud anti-Semite who believes in lizard Illuminati. The paper of record is, more and more, the record of those living in a distant galaxy, one whose concerns are profoundly removed from the lives of most people. This is a galaxy in which, to choose just a few recent examples, the Soviet space program is lauded for its “diversity”; the doxxing of teenagers in the name of justice is condoned; and the worst caste systems in human history includes the United States alongside Nazi Germany.Even now, I am confident that most people at The Times do not hold these views. Yet they are cowed by those who do. Why? Perhaps because they believe the ultimate goal is righteous. Perhaps because they believe that they will be granted protection if they nod along as the coin of our realm—language—is degraded in service to an ever-shifting laundry list of right causes. Perhaps because there are millions of unemployed people in this country and they feel lucky to have a job in a contracting industry. Or perhaps it is because they know that, nowadays, standing up for principle at the paper does not win plaudits. It puts a target on your back. Too wise to post on Slack, they write to me privately about the “new McCarthyism” that has taken root at the paper of record.All this bodes ill, especially for independent-minded young writers and editors paying close attention to what they’ll have to do to advance in their careers. Rule One: Speak your mind at your own peril. Rule Two: Never risk commissioning a story that goes against the narrative. Rule Three: Never believe an editor or publisher who urges you to go against the grain. Eventually, the publisher will cave to the mob, the editor will get fired or reassigned, and you’ll be hung out to dry.For these young writers and editors, there is one consolation. As places like The Times and other once-great journalistic institutions betray their standards and lose sight of their principles, Americans still hunger for news that is accurate, opinions that are vital, and debate that is sincere. I hear from these people every day. “An independent press is not a liberal ideal or a progressive ideal or a democratic ideal. It’s an American ideal,” you said a few years ago. I couldn’t agree more. America is a great country that deserves a great newspaper. None of this means that some of the most talented journalists in the world don’t still labor for this newspaper. They do, which is what makes the illiberal environment especially heartbreaking. I will be, as ever, a dedicated reader of their work. But I can no longer do the work that you brought me here to do—the work that Adolph Ochs described in that famous 1896 statement: “to make of the columns of The New York Times a forum for the consideration of all questions of public importance, and to that end to invite intelligent discussion from all shades of opinion.”Ochs’s idea is one of the best I’ve encountered. And I’ve always comforted myself with the notion that the best ideas win out. But ideas cannot win on their own. They need a voice. They need a hearing. Above all, they must be backed by people willing to live by them. Sincerely,Barilast_img read more

BT employees get a taste for golf

first_img BT employees in the north east have offered a ringing endorsement of the national drive to encourage more people into golf. And the company says it is not just the individuals who are benefitting, but their business too. BT decided to promote golf to the company’s employees after reading about its impressive physical and mental wellbeing benefits. The company learnt about the sport’s benefits and the work of the Get into golf campaign in a British Heart Foundation health-for-work newsletter. It seemed perfect for BT’s Fit for Life programme, designed to help BT employees become healthy and active, raise money for charity and help in the community. “A round of golf can involve walking up to five miles (10k) and burning around 900 calories. Golf also helps you relax, reduces stress and encourages you to spend time with friends out in the fresh air,” says BT senior nursing advisor Jo Jenkins “This can help those who work at BT feel more energised, fit and healthy which can only be positive. Golf can also create good working relationships by encouraging bonding away from the office environment.” Get into golf set up a BT after-work taster event for employees at the company’s Newcastle office. It took place at City of Newcastle Golf Club and was run by PGA pro Steve McKenna through the Northumberland Golf Development Group. The event was attended by 17 employees from BT; some had played golf before while others were completely new to the game. Steve taught the group the basics of golf, including arm motion, or ‘swing’, and how it controls the direction of the ball. They also learned to hold the club, known as the ‘grip’. They tried their hand at hitting some balls with a 7-iron on the driving range. Paul Whittaker, the Northumberland County Development Officer, took the group on the putting green for a fun competition to see who could putt around five holes using the least amount of strokes. The event finished with refreshments in the clubhouse while Paul talked about the follow-on opportunities of a five-week beginner course for just £25. Steve McKenna commented:  “This type of activity is a great way to sow the seeds to a healthier lifestyle through golf.” Get into golf is the national campaign to inspire adults to take up golf, run by England Golf and supported by Sport England National Lottery funding. For more information visit getintogolf.org or call 0800 118 2766 21 Oct 2015 BT employees get a taste for golf last_img read more