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Blocking tactics: Banks join the RG revolution

first_img A move by one UK bank to allow customers to block gambling transactions has led to both a ripple effect in the financial services industry and an awareness that a cross-sector approach is needed to reduce gambling-related harm, reports Joanne Christie A move by one UK bank to allow customers to block gambling transactions has led to both a ripple effect in the financial services industry and an awareness that a cross-sector approach is needed to reduce gambling-related harm, reports Joanne Christie.When a recovered gambler called Tony Franklin approached Starling Bank and asked if it might be possible to block gambling transactions to help those with difficulties controlling their gambling, he kick-started a significant shift in thinking about the role of the financial services sector in reducing problem gambling.Though the perception is often that the issue is caused by the gambling industry and is therefore one it is responsible for solving, if you ask those who’ve experienced gambling-related harm they often have other ideas, particularly given the financial harm so often linked with problem gambling.Tony Marini, a recovered compulsive gambler and senior specialist therapist at Castle Craig Hospital, where he helps others overcome addiction issues, told iGaming Business last year he saw banks as having a vital role to play in preventing gambling-related harm.“What I am finding from the people who have problems now is they are using different online sites, so they are spreading themselves around,” he said. “Banks must notice that people are doing all these transactions at different sites.”Fortunately for Franklin and Marini, not only was challenger bank Starling open to the idea, but its move to introduce the first banking gambling block in the UK was quickly followed by similar moves from other banks.Starting a trend
 “This is now a thing, it didn’t used to exist,” says Starling Bank’s head of corporate affairs Alexandra Frean. “We have had a lot of positive feedback and people have said thank you. When we announced it last year, I think the fact that we were first and that other banks have subsequently done it has meant people are grateful that we kicked off the conversation.”Shortly after Starling launched its block in June 2018, rival challenger bank Monzo announced a similar block and Barclays was the first high street bank to follow suit in December the same year.“Banks have worked hard to make it easy for customers to make payments quickly and easily. However, we know that sometimes there can be a downside to this and we’ve thought about how we can introduce friction into the payments process in a way that customers can control,” says Clare Francis, director of savings and investments at Barclays UK.“Barclays developed the new tool with customers in vulnerable circumstances in mind, particularly those with mental health issues and addictions. We know from feedback from our own customers, as well as from research from the Money and Mental Health Policy Institute, that people with mental health issues struggle to control their spending,”.Since then the likes of Halifax, Lloyds Bank, Bank of Scotland, MBNA, NatWest and HSBC have also introduced gambling blocking features.So far, all the evidence points to these being a much-needed tool. Frean says about 25% of Starling Bank customers have turned on the gambling block. However, she qualifies that by adding: “I’ve turned on the gambling block on my Starling app and I do not do gambling or gaming, I just turned it on because I can. So what we can’t tell is of the people who have turned it on, how many of them have just done it because they were in the app and saw it there and thought ‘I’ll switch that on’, or because they have an issue with gambling and gaming.”Similarly, HSBC reported “really positive take-up” shortly after launching its block in November 2019. “We launched on 12 November and through to 30 November we have seen over 6,000 blocks applied already,” says Maxine Pritchard, head of financial inclusion and vulnerability at HSBC. “The really positive note on that is that only around 10% of those blocks have been removed, so people are applying the block and leaving it there.”The Lloyds Banking Group said in mid-December that across its four brands – Halifax, Lloyds, Bank of Scotland and MBNA – 30,000 debit and credit card customers had signed up to gambling card controls since they were launched at the end of October.A number of the more recent entrants to gambling blocks have also implemented other measures to assist those at risk of gambling-related harm. NatWest, for example, recently announced it will offer counselling sessions with GamCare staff in 13 of its branches.HSBC, which says it receives an average of 1,000 calls per month related to gambling, also arranged GamCare training on gambling addiction for its specialist support team, which helps vulnerable customers. “That training really gave the team an understanding of how to open up a conversation and the kind of questions that you might ask,” says Pritchard.Bringing operators into the equation
 Much of the work being done by financial institutions has involved consultation with gambling charities; however, thus far there’s been very little consultation with gambling operators themselves.To counter this, in late 2018 a Collaboration Day was organised by Playtech, William Hill and Sky Bet, bringing together representatives from the financial sector, the charity sector and the gambling sector.“A number of financial services organisations had initiated new tools and services to support at-risk and vulnerable customers and there was an opportunity to bring those sectors together to facilitate cross-sector dialogue, share insights and ideas,” explains Lauren Iannarone, head of public affairs and sustainability at Playtech.From this event came the idea of a cross-sector initiative on gambling-related financial harm, a project spearheaded by GamCare and officially launched in October 2019.Megan Pengelly, programme manager for risk reduction projects at GamCare, says the Collaboration Day resulted in a clear realisation that there was a need for sectors to work together to develop consistent solutions to help tackle and prevent problem gambling.“The strongest theme around financial harm is that really for these different tools and initiatives to be effective they have to be consistent and across the board. What we noticed is that there is lots of brilliant work happening in each of those sectors but: a) not everybody knows what each other is doing; and b) some of the work can be increased and made even better when it is shared and used across the board and informed by each other’s work.“If people are hearing one thing from their operator, the place they go to gamble, then another thing from their bank, and then perhaps another thing when they come to GamCare or are referred to GamCare, that is very inconsistent and it is more likely that people will drop out of the service or get into other issues as well,” she says. The project brings together four key sectors including banking, debt advice, gambling treatment and the gambling industry, with the aim of developing a best practice framework in three key areas:  communications, identification and proactive tools such as gambling blocks.Creating consistency
 The project’s advisory panel, which includes representatives from HSBC, RBS, Santander, Citizens Advice, Playtech, the Senet Group, the Money and Pensions Service, PayPlan and individuals with experience of gambling-related financial harm, is currently working to map all the services that already exist, before determining how to best standardise these offerings going forward.There may be opportunities for more initiatives such as the counselling service announced by NatWest, for example. “What we’re really keen on is different locations that people can go and get help,” says Pengelly. “The great thing about going to banks is it reduces stigma. If people have to go out of their way to find a service it maybe makes people a bit more reluctant to do it, so where there are opportunities to get it on the high street and for it to be discreet and linked in with other services, we think that is a really good extra service.”The gambling blocks that largely set the ball rolling are also one of the items on the agenda, says Pengelly. “We don’t have a big pool of evidence yet; anecdotally problem gamblers are finding it really useful but it is really now about getting consistency within those gambling blocks, so finding out what the best cool-off time is, finding out if you should have to ring up to shut it down. Across the board all the gambling blocks look slightly different.”A separate project launched in September 2019 to explore the role of financial services firms in reducing gambling-related harm is also looking into this issue. Money and Gambling: Practice, Insight, Evidence (MAGPIE), a partnership between the University of Bristol’s Personal Finance Research Centre (PFRC) and GambleAware, will run over three years with its first six months focused on the effectiveness of spending controls such as gambling blocks.While some of the gambling blocks can be turned on and off instantly by account holders, others cannot be turned back on for 24 or 48 hours.At HSBC, for example, there is a 24-hour cooling off period. “We worked with GamCare to define what that solution looks like and we identified that a 24-hour cooling off period was a good period to give the customer time to think and consider whether gambling is right for them,” says Pritchard. “That was definitely suggested as something that would be useful to our customers so that they are not in that hot state where they might feel compelled to gamble.”Mark Knighton, who has been involved in many responsible gaming initiatives including Svenska Spel’s early efforts to market Playscan, has previously expressed concerns about the effectiveness of gambling blocking software, but says he believes bank blocks could be far more successful than computer software because they could prevent problems from a “root level”. However, he adds: “But what is the process is if they want to turn it back on again? It may be an issue if it’s easy to do so.”Though it would be easy to assume gambling operators themselves might be in favour of blocks that are easily reversed, or in fact, averse to the idea of blocks at all as they present barriers to consumers using their products, Pengelly says that has not been her experience thus far. “To my knowledge I don’t think there has been any pushback that I’ve heard of from operators.”Similarly, Iannarone says: “We don’t want to make money from people who clearly experiencing gambling-related harm. Tools, such as banking blocks, are one of several important ways to help educate and protect at-risk and vulnerable consumers.” She says that the industry is, in fact, very keen to become involved in collaborative efforts to reduce gambling-related harm.“There is an authentic commitment to make gambling safer and reduce gambling-related harm and cross-sector collaboration can be a key enabler to make this happen.“There is no one silver bullet to solve the challenge, you need collaboration across a diverse range of organisations, with complementary skills, capabilities and resources, working together to drive positive change.” Regions: UK & Ireland AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Tags: Payments 14th January 2020 | By contenteditor Topics: Legal & compliance People Tech & innovation Legal & compliance Blocking tactics: Banks join the RG revolution Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Email Addresslast_img read more

TATEPA Limited (TATEPA.tz) 2006 Annual Report

first_imgTATEPA Limited (TATEPA.tz) listed on the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange under the Agri-industrial sector has released it’s 2006 annual report.For more information about TATEPA Limited (TATEPA.tz) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the TATEPA Limited (TATEPA.tz) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: TATEPA Limited (TATEPA.tz)  2006 annual report.Company ProfileTanzania Tea Packers Limited (TATEPA) is an agricultural holding company involved in growing, processing, blending, packing and selling tea in Tanzania and for international export. The company also has interests in growing and distributing avocadoes and tropical fruit. Tatepa Limited holds a 75% stake in Wakulima Tea Company Limited which grows, processes and sells tea for local and export markets; a 74.3% stake in Rungwe Avocado Company Limited which grows, packs and exports avocadoes; and a 54.4% stake in Freshfields Investments Limited. Other subsidiary companies include Kibena Tea Limited which grows and processes tea and Chai Bora Limited which blends, packages and markets packed tea in Tanzania and for international export. TATEPA Limited is listed on the Dar es Salam Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Forget the National Lottery draw. I think UK shares are a better way to get rich!

first_img See all posts by Paul Summers Image source: Getty Images. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Paul Summers | Wednesday, 23rd December, 2020 “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee.center_img Paul Summers has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Forget the National Lottery draw. I think UK shares are a better way to get rich! Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Enter Your Email Address Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! After an awful 2020, it makes sense people will want to have fun if they can (or as much as the rules will allow) this Christmas. For many, this will involve buying tickets for today’s £15m National Lottery ‘Lotto’ draw. I won’t be one of them.Rather than dismiss me as some irksome Scrooge out to steal any sense of joy from the festive period, l implore you to keep reading. Your future (far richer) self may thank you for doing so.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…National Lottery draw: The awful oddsTo begin with, let’s look at some facts. Your chances of having the winning Lotto ticket by picking the correct six numbers are 1 in a little over 45m. To put things in perspective, you have a better chance of being struck and killed by lightning in the UK (1 in 19m). Even just matching three numbers isn’t easy. Only 1 in 97 tickets manages this feat. And the prize for all that good fortune? £30.  What’s the harm?Now, don’t get me wrong. I’m not for a minute suggesting people don’t know what they’re doing. While most of us won’t know the exact odds of winning mentioned above, we’re sensible enough to appreciate the chances are slim to exceptionally slim.There is, of course, nothing inherently wrong with a one-time flutter at Christmas either. Just dreaming about what one could do with £15m is nice enough, particularly after the horrific year that 2020 has been. No, the problem comes from repeatedly buying tickets. And given that many people will be feeling the pinch in 2021, due to Brexit and Covid-19, it’s quite possible some will get into the habit of doing so to increase their chances of striking it rich.  This habit could get very expensive. Right now, entering the main National Lottery draw costs £2 per line. Let’s say a person regularly plays five ‘lines’ twice a week, every week. Over the course of a year, that comes to a staggering £1,040.I think there’s a far better route to riches.UK shares are a better betGiven the choice, I’d always invest that £1,040 in the best UK shares I can find over participating in the National Lottery draw. There are a couple of big reasons for this.First, shares are more likely to make people rich than the Lotto ever will, albeit at a slower rate. History shows that stock market returns trump every other asset over the long term.Remember that £1,040? If I were to invest this amount in the stock market in one go and generate a quite reasonable 7% annual return for 30 years, I’d have almost £8,000 at the end. If I managed to make a 10% return, I’d have a little over £18,000. Sure, there will be ups and downs along the way, but the end result is surely worth holding for.Don’t forget, this example is based solely on the money that could have been spent gambling in a single year. Think how much better the outcome could be if I put even more money to work. A second reason is that, right now, many London-listed stocks are still far too cheap. As seasoned investors will attest, the very best time to buy shares is when they are hated. Pick well, and the Christmas flutter you do have on a National Lottery draw will be irrelevant.last_img read more

Making money is academic

About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 19 April 1999 | News  19 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The Guardian Higher reports on the academics who have made a fortune from applying their research commercially. Between 1996-97 223 spin-off companies were created by universities. The Guardian Higher reports on the academics who have made a fortune from applying their research commercially. Between 1996-97 223 spin-off companies were created by universities. One estimated puts the numbers of academic millionaires created as a result of these companies at between 20 and 100. Some of these are, of course, more paper millionaires than cash-rich.Successful commercial academics include: Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Professor Alan Wilson, vice-chancellor of Leeds University, who received nearly £1 million from the sale of his company GMAP Ltd in 1997 Professor Peter Denyer, Edinburgh University, main shareholder of VLSI Vision plc, which sold for £23.3 million Dr Martin Porter, Cambridge University, a founder-director of Muscat Ltd, 70% of which MAID plc bought for £8 million Prospect researchers might be pleased to know that some of these successful academics have already begun to donate some of their wealth. Professor Ken Murray, inventor of the hepatitis vaccine, helped fund two new buildings and student scholarships. Roger Needham, formerly at Cambridge University’s computer laboratory, gave £200,000 to Wolfson College. Making money is academic read more

FSB appoints compliance consultant

first_imgWhyte worked for the Direct Marketing Assocation for nine years before becoming a consultant on data protection, consumer law and best practice issues. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The Fundraising Stadnards Board (FSB) has appointned Jo Whyte as compliance consultant to advise on handling and resolving complaints received from members of the public in England and Wales.This brings the staff of the FSB to four full-time and two part-time members in the London office and one full-time member for Scotland and Northern Ireland. Whyte will work to manage complaints cases and present any that require the three-stage resolution process to the board of the FSB. She will work closely with FSB members who have had a complaint to ensure they abide by the standards set in the Fundraising Promise. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  15 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 11 January 2007 | News FSB appoints compliance consultantlast_img read more

Times Christmas Charity Appeal seeks charity partners

Tagged with: corporate The Christmas appeal runs for a minimum of four weeks, sometimes longer and the paper is keen to work with the charity partner to generate a large amount of information and background about the organisation and its work. Of particular interest are charities that can provide a wide variety of individual human interest sstories and illustrated reports from the field during andbeyond the lifespan of the appeal.Writen applications have to be in by 1 September and should be sent to David Chappell, Managing Editor, The Times, 1 Pennington Street, London E98 1TT.  22 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Times Christmas Charity Appeal seeks charity partners The Times is looking for charities who would like to benefit from its Christmas Appeal 2007.In 2006 the Red Cross was selected and readers raised around £150,000. Two charities benefited in 2005 – The Freeplay Foundation and The Salvation Army with more than £240,000 being raised for the Freeplay Foundation alone.Charities should submit an application that includes background details about the organisation, its history and its work. Any specific project or projects should be outlined clearly with an explanation of the purpose and goal of this particular work. The Times supports charities that will benefit from the newspaper’s ability to get the charity’s message out to its readership. Advertisement Howard Lake | 7 August 2007 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. read more

Action Planning to help BHF develop fundraising volunteers

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The British Heart Foundation has appointed fundraising consultancy Action Planning to help it build the contribution of its community fundraising volunteers.The charity is aiming to identify ways in which its community fundraising volunteers can play an increased role in local income generation and in presenting the BHF’s work to key audiences.Andrew Reid, National Head of Community Fundraising, said: “We are extremely fortunate in having so many highly skilled volunteers who care passionately about our work. Our aim is to develop even more opportunities for them to play a central role in taking forward, financing and promoting our work, and we are delighted to be working with Action Planning on this challenge”. Advertisement Howard Lake | 13 November 2007 | News  27 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Action Planning to help BHF develop fundraising volunteers Tagged with: Community fundraising Consulting & Agencies Volunteering AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

Pandemic sees sharp decline in charity leaders’ confidence about future income

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 “When we launched the 2020 edition of Third Sector Trends in May we knew the data would need to be updated because of the pandemic. We can’t say whether the fears of organisations surveyed the organisations will come to pass but the data gives us a benchmark for when we come back in 2022 and find out whether this lack of confidence was misplaced.”  299 total views,  2 views today  300 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 Pandemic sees sharp decline in charity leaders’ confidence about future income Confidence in the future income of charities and community organisations has fallen sharply among their leaders since the Covid-19 pandemic took hold, a new survey shows.The Community Foundation Tyne & Wear and Northumberland and St Chad’s College, Durham University surveyed over 400 leaders of charities and community organisations across England and Wales.56% of third sector leaders surveyed in June expect their income from a range of sources to fall over the next two years: up from 16% in 2019.Around two thirds – 62% – expect income from private sector sources to fall. In 2019, only 11% of expected this to be the case.Half of the leaders surveyed also believe grant income will decrease over the next two years, compared with 19% in 2019, while 61% think statutory funding would decrease, up from 38% in 2019.Expectations about volunteer support has also changed: in 2019 8% of leaders thought this would fall. Now 18% of think this will be the case.The survey follows Community Foundation and St Chad’s College’s 2019 Third Sector Trends research and set out to see how attitudes about future prospects for third sector organisations had changed, and provide an opportunity for leaders to talk about how the pandemic was affecting them now or might do so in the future.However, despite the pessimism over future income, the survey also reveals some optimism over the sector’s resilience among respondents’ comments.Professor Tony Chapman, Director of Research at St Chad’s College, who authored the original reports and this follow up said:“At the moment, leaders of third sector organisations are feeling pretty nervous about the future – and with good reason. There are so many unknowns about income levels, availability of volunteers, the conditions under which organisations will be allowed to work and the change in demand for services. We are all guessing what will happen next. Yes, it is clear that confidence but the individual comments suggest a good deal of variation in attitudes ranging from strong optimism to outright pessimism – while others present ambivalent feelings. What this report does do is provide us with a very useful baseline with which to compare when Third Sector Trends surveying resumes in mid-2022.”Rob Williamson, Chief Executive of the Community Foundation, which commissions Third Sector Trends added: Advertisementcenter_img About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. Melanie May | 14 August 2020 | News Tagged with: COVID-19 Research / statisticslast_img read more

Open letter to Miklos Haraszti, the OSCE representative on freedom of the media

first_imgNews “We welcome opening of criminal investigation in Lithuania in response to our complaint against Lukashenko” RSF says Robert MénardSecretary-General August 11, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Open letter to Miklos Haraszti, the OSCE representative on freedom of the media News Reporters Without Borders would like to share with you its concern about the action of the Belarusian authorities in preventing Polish journalists and journalists from Belarus’ ethnic Polish minority from freely working on several occasions since March. The frequency of these press freedom violations has increased since 6 July.To our knowledge, a total of two journalists of Polish nationality or from Belarus’ Polish minority have been sentenced to prison sentences of 10 to 15 days. We have also registered at least 13 cases of journalists being arrested, two cases of journalists being fined and two cases of journalists being banned from re-entering Belarus.- Andrei Pochobut, the editor of the publication Magazyn Polski, and Ihar Bantsar of Glos znad Niemna, a Polish-language weekly published in Belarus, were fined 2,000 and 200 euros respectively on 6 July for taking part in a demonstration against the action of the Belarusian authorities in publishing four falsified copies of Glos znad Niemna.- Andrei Pochobut of Magazyn Polski was sentenced to 15 days in prison on 27 July for “participating in an illegal demonstration in Shchuchin on 3 July and civil disobedience.” He had participated in a protest against the government’s takeover of the Union of Belarusian Poles.- Three Polish journalists, Waclaw Radzinowicz and Robert Kowalewski of Gazeta Wyborcza (the biggest Polish daily) and Agnieszka Romaszewska of the Polish television station TVP1, were arrested by the police on 27 July when they came to cover their colleagues’ trial.- Ten Belarusian and Polish journalists with Gazeta Wyborcza, Associated Press, Glos znad Niemna, Nasha Niva, Pressbol and the www.pahonia.promedia.by website who were present when special forces took over the headquarters of the Union of Belarusian Poles at 10 p.m. on 27 July were detained and taken to a police station before being released two hours later.- Andrzej Pisalnik, the editor of the weekly Glos znad Niemna and a contributor to Gazeta Wyborcza, was sentenced by a court in the western city of Lida on 4 August to 10 days in prison for “participating in an illegal demonstration in Shchuchin on 3 July and civil disobedience.”- Marcin Smialowski, the former correspondent in Belarus of the Polish news agency Polska Agencja Prasowa and a stringer for the Polish public radio station Polskie Radio and the privately-owned television station TVN, was refused entry by Belarusian border guards on 5 August despite having a visa and the necessary accreditation.- Adam Tuchlinski, a Polish news photographer with the weekly Przekroj, was arrested on 6 August in the western city of Grodno as he was about to board a train to return to Poland. Officials said Tuchlinski, who was travelling on a tourist visa, did not have the necessary accreditation. He is now banned from visiting Belarus for five years.Knowing your commitment to press freedom, we appeal to you to intervene with the appropriate authorities with the aim of guaranteeing the safety and freedom of journalists in Belarus. Our organisation believes that journalists should not be the direct of indirect victims of the current diplomatic crisis between Poland and Belarus.We trust you will give this matter your careful consideration. BelarusEurope – Central Asia May 27, 2021 Find out more News RSF_en Help by sharing this information May 28, 2021 Find out more Mr. Miklos Haraszti,OSCE Representative on Freedom of the MediaVienna AUSTRIA Paris, 11 August 2005center_img Receive email alerts to go further News RSF at the Belarusian border: “The terrorist is the one who jails journalists and intimidates the public” Follow the news on Belarus June 2, 2021 Find out more BelarusEurope – Central Asia Journalists have become the victim of the current diplomatic crisis between Poland and Belarus. Reporters Without Borders wrote today to Miklos Haraszti, the OSCE representative on freedom of the media, asking him to intervene with the Belarusian authorities. Organisation Russian media boss drops the pretence and defends Belarus crackdown Dear Mr. Haraszti,last_img read more

Comptroller of the Currency Discusses Progress Made Toward Rehabilitating Urban Communities

first_img Comptroller of the Currency Discusses Progress Made Toward Rehabilitating Urban Communities The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago About Author: Brian Honea Community Rehabilitation Community Revitalization Comptroller of the Currency OCC Ohio 2015-09-11 Brian Honea Previous: U.S. Rep. Duffy Says Financial Reform Attempts Have Failed America Next: Revenue Remains Constrained for Banks in Q2 Despite Record Earnings Home / Daily Dose / Comptroller of the Currency Discusses Progress Made Toward Rehabilitating Urban Communities Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago September 11, 2015 884 Views Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago  Print This Post Share Save Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily center_img Tagged with: Community Rehabilitation Community Revitalization Comptroller of the Currency OCC Ohio Comptroller of the Currency Thomas Curry, addressing the City Club of Cleveland Wednesday, spoke on banks striking a balance between ensuring safety and soundness through proper risk controls while leaving room for innovative financing that can help revitalize communities.Urban stabilization and revitalization have long been at the top of the OCC’s national agenda, Curry said, and Cleveland and other Midwestern cities have seen their share of foreclosures, shuttered manufacturers, and population outflow during and since the financial crisis.”We know that it takes imagination, innovation, resourcefulness, and persistence to truly transform a city. It also takes a huge investment of financial resources,” Curry said. “As a regulator, I am deeply interested in the role that our financial institutions are playing, and must continue to play, in the revival of America’s cities.”Curry said that the banking system has “significantly recovered” from the economic calamity the nation suffered from 2007 to 2009.”There are many reasons for this, including an enhanced regulatory regime that holds banks to higher standards of risk management and corporate behavior,” he said. “Bankers today are focused on finding ways to show they can be profitable and responsible. And, in cities across America, and especially in places where the housing recovery is still lagging, bankers’ efforts are producing real results.”Curry cited as one examples of this the Cleveland community of Slavic Village, which was widely reported to have recorded more foreclosures than anywhere else in the nation in 2007 at the beginning of the crisis. An OCC-supervised institution has led the way in recovery by investing in community organizations. Another example is the Greater University Circle Initiative, which has “leveraged the combined efforts of area universities, museums, and hospitals, is another fine example of the public-private partnerships that are needed to carry out comprehensive strategies,” Curry said.The problem of foreclosures and abandoned properties has persisted in Cleveland and many Midwestern cities, and one way this problem is being addressed is through the land bank movement, Curry said. The land bank is a non-profit, government-affiliated entity which has adopted several strategies to acquire and dispose of foreclosed and abandoned properties.”We know that it takes imagination, innovation, resourcefulness, and persistence to truly transform a city. It also takes a huge investment of financial resources.””(The land bank) partnered with a local university to develop a data tool that now aids in the decision making about which neighborhoods and properties to target for rehabilitation or stabilization,” Curry said. “Some 60 percent of the land bank’s properties are beyond repair and are slated for demolition. In many cases, banks are paying for the demolition cost on properties they donate so the Land Bank does not have to absorb that expense.”The land bank has developed a creative housing program to foster homeownership for properties that can be rehabilitated, Curry said.A lack of credit access has been a concern in many cities, including Cleveland, since the crisis, according to Curry. He said, however, the issue of a lack of credit access “arises in part from certain misconceptions about supervisory standards and expectations.” Curry  said the OCC has raised expectations regarding credit underwriting and loan portfolio management since the crisisOCC has raised its expectations regarding credit underwriting and loan portfolio management since the end of the financial crisis, but in some of the hardest-hit communities or communities with low-valued properties, the OCC’s supervisory policies might present challenges in the lending process. That process becomes further complicated when these properties need substantial renovation, which must also be financed, in order for the properties to be habitable.”We have tried to address these concerns by pointing out that the supervisory standards discussing the 90 percent loan-to-value limit for residential lending do not create an ironclad ban on lending above that limit, even if there are no credit enhancements. Indeed, the standards acknowledge that lending above that limit in excess of supervisory loan-to-value expectations can be consistent with safe and sound lending practices in specified circumstances, provided that banks maintain appropriate controls and otherwise comply with applicable law, regulation, guidance, and the bank’s own policies and procedures,” Curry said. The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Related Articles in Daily Dose, Featured, Foreclosure, News Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more